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View Full Version : Post work on interior shots...


coccosoids
07-02-2007, 06:31 AM
Hey guys! And thank you for 'tuning' in... :)
I have a few questions concerning the post work, no! make that "essential" post work
implied by these still interior shots.

The main thing I'm concerned with is noise.
Because of hardware limitations I have to render at, obviously, lower resolutions than the
final output. Generally 2 times lower. So, regarding noise, when should it be applied?
On the original image, or on the final, up-scaled one? And even more, what type of noise:
gaussian/monochrome? And do yo apply more in some arreas and less in others etc?

Now, for other 'operations' applied to interior renderings - I heard that a little bit of
bignetting "adds" a lot to the overall feeling of an image. Are there any general rules when it
comes that?

Let's talk a little about color correction and sharpening. Let's bring out sharpening first.
Again, as with noise, what makes more sense: applying it on the original sized image or the
scaled one? Now, about color correction: what are some simple fundamental (if any) rules
of even considering it. I mean besides artistical feeling ;) . Just, can you tell just by looking
at a histogram that there is something wrong with tonal state of an imge.

That's about it for now.
Thank you very much.

coccosoids
07-02-2007, 11:56 AM
Nobody?!

How's this for a chance?

http://i9.tinypic.com/6d174wj.png

I think it's a little bit over-done.

Maybe you could post some tutorials links if you know some very good ones. :)
Thanks.

coccosoids
07-02-2007, 02:38 PM
Help?! :)
...
..
.

coccosoids
07-02-2007, 07:53 PM
Shameless bump! ;)

Joss
07-03-2007, 01:07 AM
So, regarding noise, when should it be applied?

My opinion: NEVER!

No more noise/grain! Cannot stand seeing noise! Noise is.... OLD SCHOOL.

Smooth is the way of the future as, and I hate to say it but immitating film grain is dead.

You have a wonderful render! Please leave the noise out and I'll like it even more!

:thumbsup:

SanjayChand
07-04-2007, 09:12 AM
I personally like grain.

In more cases than not , a realistic CG render looks like a photograph. In todays world, people have been subconsciously conditioned to accept grain in both photos and cinema, as they have been overwhelmingly present in both for quite a while.

Only when grain is completely eliminated from the technology of both cinema and the photography world and has been for many years will the "effect" of such affect the global populace.

as far as your questions, I think it is best to keep the original images as pure as possible and then add all of the post-processing either. Its easier to add stuff then take it away.

sixbysixx
07-04-2007, 03:02 PM
The main thing I'm concerned with is noise.
Because of hardware limitations I have to render at, obviously, lower resolutions than the
final output. Generally 2 times lower. So, regarding noise, when should it be applied?
On the original image, or on the final, up-scaled one? And even more, what type of noise:
gaussian/monochrome? And do yo apply more in some arreas and less in others etc?
Definitely apply noise AFTER interpolating the size. Same goes for sharpening.
Noise has definitely been overused as a visual style, but in my opinion, if you use it in a subtle way it will give almost every render that slight edge and a more organic feeling. But I'm talking very subtle, so subtle that youy have to look closer in order to notice the noise.
In Photoshop I find HSB noise from EyeCandy or PowerRetouche FilmGrain to be the best. In the latter you can control very nicely how much noise to apply in the shadows, mids and HiLights.
Apply noise after sharpening.


Now, for other 'operations' applied to interior renderings - I heard that a little bit of
bignetting "adds" a lot to the overall feeling of an image. Are there any general rules when it comes that?

All comes down to personal taste. In my large format photographs I use center filters in order to eliminate vignettes, because I like the even look. Other photographers introduce vignettes as an effect. Zoom lenses at open apertures have a much stronger vignetting effect than prime lenses or if you stop down. It is after all a lens error.
So no rules here...


Now, about color correction: what are some simple fundamental (if any) rules
of even considering it. I mean besides artistical feeling ;) . Just, can you tell just by looking
at a histogram that there is something wrong with tonal state of an imge.

If you look at the histogram there shouldn't be any regular gaps.
Usually you will only get these when you're working in 8bit anyway.
Also it's more important that the image looks good, even if the histogram doesn't.
As a general rule: when you know you will have to work on images in post, do not render anything lower than 16bit. When working with scans of film you can get away with it because the grain/noise will camouflage banding, but with renders and to a lesser extend also files from digital cameras you will get nasty banding very quickly.
A cheap workaround if you get banding in an 8bit file: add a little noise.

When working with 16bit in Photoshop you need to view at least at 51% in order to see the 16bit colours. When viewing at 50% or lower you'll only see 8bit colours and might see some banding that actually isn't there in the file.

Another thing regarding sharpness: 3d people seem to love Mitchell and Lanczos filters for rendering. For me coming from the photographic world they look very CGI - way too sharp. I find a Gauss 3/3 much more organic and realistic - though a lot of 3d people will disagree and think it looks soft or blurry...

Hope this helps

PS: a little comment regarding your image: you seem have a fair amount of aliasing going on there, but it's kind of hard to tell with the JPEG artifacts.

coccosoids
07-04-2007, 04:07 PM
Here's the final image...
I personally like more the previous one, with more pronounced noise. :)


http://i17.tinypic.com/4koyagw.jpg

Maybe I should have mentioned earlier that my questions really were directed more towards
images rendered for print...
So in that case, noise should be applied before or after magnification?? :)
Thanks to al who have replied... as soon as I get some spare time I shall put all your
suggestions to work...
Thanks again.

SanjayChand
07-05-2007, 08:12 AM
one thing that would help your image more-so than post processing is shader work. You have large blocks of solid color, particularily in the background.

Perhaps introducing more gradation would help.

coccosoids
07-05-2007, 08:55 AM
Yes I agree... A little more detail would have helped a lot.. :)
But, this was a quick job so I couldn't afford to spend too much time on it! ;)

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