PDA

View Full Version : Future of Film Conference


PaulHellard
04-16-2007, 08:01 AM
Hi there,

CGSociety went along to the Conference about the Future of Film, Digital Entertainment and was given a view of media out to the next 20 years. The industry is moving so quickly right now, this may be foreshortened to 10 years view.

Click on the image to go to the story, and come back and give us two cents worth.

http://features.cgsociety.org/stories/2007_04/future_film/SamHas.jpg (http://features.cgsociety.org/story_custom.php?story_id=4011)

picolo
04-16-2007, 09:56 AM
very nice article thx
it has opened me the eyes on some points and confirmed my ideas on other

methion
04-16-2007, 02:28 PM
This sounded like vested interests looking after their interests. It's sort of like having Hilary Rosen chair a panel on the future of digital music. It was movie execs patting themselves on the back for not being completely irrelevant and inviting a few "dissenters" and "outsiders" to add some contrived color. I doubt the phrase "Creative Commons" ever escaped anyones lips the entire time. Just because these guys finally learned to use the tubes after kicking and screaming doesnt mean theyre trend setters. Not one of these "leaders" actually had anything to do with any of these great new ideas.

JA-forreal
04-17-2007, 04:39 AM
The article closed well:
In the end
The studios and developers are building their roads to the future, and the innovative and brave are discovering new paths. As these cross and diverge, they keep one sight in common finding the end of the rainbow where all the colors meet. The delivery medium will chase the consumer, who will demand to see what they cannot envision themselves. The artists will provide that vision, striving to capture the perfection in their minds eye. It is the artist, in this scenario, that leads the way.

Like most of us here don't know this already. Hopefully more artist will realize the potential for power that computers hand out to them.

picolo
04-17-2007, 10:11 AM
well its not bad to know what think big sharks :p

methion
04-17-2007, 04:16 PM
You've def got a point there. I should point out and give kudos to the CGS editorial staff for bringing this report to us. Thanks guys, good work.

But my comments about the people headlining the conference stand, though.

JA-forreal
04-17-2007, 07:58 PM
Thinking of YouTube. I wonder how many serious independent cg artist or small cg media companies make use of that medium to push their own efforts? This article had me thinking of artist offering an alternative to what big media companies provide. How many independent cg artist, film makers, etc. make use of affordable enterprise level cg/media software, powerful consumer level computer/visual/audio hardware and web promotion tech to offer substantial new media alternatives?

It's not like someones stopping any one person from rewriting the blueprint for future computer driven media. Hey the big media companies have the same opportunity and they really don't know what to do with it.

Back in the 80's and 90's artist didn't have the easy outlet of the web as a delivery medium. Folks would pass out cassette tapes, hit the streets with fliers, stickers, underground clubs, public performances, whatever it took. I remember listening to E40 cassette tapes back in the day that someone got from a friend of a friend. Word of mouth is often the best tool for promoting anything due to direct marketing of content to a targeted audience.

If what you have to offer is good no matter how big or small your presence is, people will talk about it. The fact that the big media companies notice the webs value is no surprise. Their competitive nature has them always on the lookout for new promotional outlets. The thing is that everyone has the same level playing field where computers are concerned now. Who actually takes advantage of that delivery medium will determine what we'll see on our screens in the future.:)

Consideringthepickle
04-19-2007, 01:19 PM
The big media companies do have one particularly big advantage over the average joe when it comes to the use of the web. They have the ability to advertise their film on virtually every major website if they wanted to. With an independant movie maker, you have to hope the right people stumble upon your little site and even if you use youtube there's no guarantee that it will even be found with all the millions of other videos out there.

Plus, I should bring up the problem of piracy. Because for a self distributor, especially someone who distributes online, piracy could become a huge issue. The big media companies are the only ones who have the funding to fight piracy with any real effect and even they can't really do anything about it. Basically, if you distribute your film online, as in independant distributor, all you can really do is pray that ethical people are getting wind of it and not the ones who want to steal it and give it out for free.

JA-forreal
04-19-2007, 06:51 PM
..........

Plus, I should bring up the problem of piracy. Because for a self distributor, especially someone who distributes online, piracy could become a huge issue. The big media companies are the only ones who have the funding to fight piracy with any real effect and even they can't really do anything about it. Basically, if you distribute your film online, as in independant distributor, all you can really do is pray that ethical people are getting wind of it and not the ones who want to steal it and give it out for free.

I think that there are ways to add personalized value into a digital media product at the time of purchase. Computers allow customers and merchants to digitally add personalized verification to products at the time of purchase. I'm surprised that big companies aren't exploring more ways to validate digital product transactions. Often product transactions online are treated like old "retail" world purchases but without the "see ya'll next time, ya hear" angle. Then there's the building customer loyalty angle this is not so valued anymore by many current major retailers. You know, making each customer feel good about their purchase via incentive offers, etc. Like pumping the gas and washing the windows. Everyone likes special treatment, even customers.

Maybe that's the answer. Future successful digital media product companies may have to make their customers feel like they're part of the team or community. Bring back that old world mom and pop music shop love?

Maybe the losing companies will continue to drop products and run from their customers. The winners may embrace their customers special taste and individual needs on a case by case basis. Give them personal commitment that's not possible from any other competitor. Really, it's like customers are just so disconnected from big companies nowadays. Rules and regulations can't force people to be loyal. Loyalty has to come from the heart.

If you add love to the process you spread love all around, maybe?:)

CGTalk Moderation
04-19-2007, 06:51 PM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.