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View Full Version : The foundry buys NUKE ?


Kai01W
03-10-2007, 10:57 PM
http://www.fxguide.com/article407.html


-k

Aneks
03-11-2007, 09:05 AM
that is huge news. I am very keen to see with this is heading.... if Nuke rolls in furnace and other tools its over for everything else in the market !

taffy77
03-11-2007, 09:19 AM
And also actually make a workflow and interface that is more akin to shake:)

Aneks
03-11-2007, 09:20 AM
the interface is puke but the workflow is actually not too bad, they just need to ste up the paint and tracking tools and I would be ok with it !

StefanA
03-11-2007, 09:43 AM
That's big news indeed (for the compositing world). Nuke seems to be the next app in line for most studios after Apple killed Shake. It will be very interesting indeed to follow what happens.

/stefan

castelis
03-11-2007, 10:12 AM
I think interface of Nuke is not bad at all. Maybe someone is not confortable with floating windows (which i could understand) but when you compare general interface behaviour to other apps it rocks. When I started with Nuke I was coming from Shake, and keep complaining about it at the forums, but than when you actually start really working with it you soon realize that there are far more gems in it that you thinked. Hopefully with Foundry it will become even better!

el_diablo
03-11-2007, 10:21 AM
Looking at the price of their plugins, I guess a price reduction for Nuke wont be comming soon...Too bad.

I loved Nuke from the get go. I bought the first license in Croatia two years ago, for my former employer. But for a small company like mine, 1k compositing software is top-limit (and there are many nowdays, Combustion, AFX, Shake).

The software was a bit in a stagnation phase during last year or so, many features broken and some taken out!!! Nuke had lights and shading before... Weird progress.

instinct-vfx
03-11-2007, 02:22 PM
i would definately not say that nuke was in a phase of stagnation. Shaders and Lights HAVE been taken out, but they didnt really work last time they were in, and were taken out while the 3d system was in a rewrite.

Anyways, i wonder what you guys hate so much about the UI. It might be non-standard and it might not have all the themed shaded nodes etc. But those only take up resources. And once you get the hang of the UI it is incredibly usable. Plus it is incredibly customisable, wich is a BIG plus in my eyes.

Am seriously wondering where this is heading as we spend quite some money on nuke :shrug:

Regards,
Thorsten

Blur1
03-11-2007, 04:00 PM
I've been using Nuke since late last year. I was initially put off by the basic tcl gui design and the floating pallettes, but now I think (the gui) is better than Shake as far as useability and flexibility. It's better having three core windows that you can put anywhere. The workspace, the viewer and the control panels which all gang into one pane that can be repositioned. Simple and effective. Here's hoping that the Foundry can really put the time in to market and polish the app a bit.

Signal2Noise
03-11-2007, 07:59 PM
...I loved Nuke from the get go. I bought the first license in Croatia two years ago...

I'm sure that must have made headlines:

"Hi, I am Igor of small beautiful Croatia and wish to buy country's first Nuke."

:D


This acquisition is interesting news indeed.

Aneks
03-12-2007, 12:08 AM
Michael you like the interface more than shake ? I suppose a lifetime of floating UI windows has accustomed you to the cofusion ! :p No I agree that the viewer feature is awesome but I find the graph and attribute panels really Urrgh !

. Here's hoping that the Foundry can really put the time in to market and polish the app a bit.

truly,
if they iron out the little thing then Nuke it is gonna be a very serious contender. After playing with the 3d in fusion 5.1 learning edition I have to say that a lack of lighs and shading is fairly disapointing. I've heard tell that the features are still there but need to accessed via the tcl command.

Blur1
03-12-2007, 12:54 AM
Michael you like the interface more than shake ? I suppose a lifetime of floating UI windows has accustomed you to the cofusion ! :p No I agree that the viewer feature is awesome but I find the graph and attribute panels really Urrgh !

OK I forgot about the graph editor spawning another window but everything else is functional. I stand corrected with the Shake UI, I see you are not limited to the quad layout which I would rather change after spawning a viewer onto a second monitor. But I think if you worked with Nuke some more you would appreciate the speed of getting around and accessing things. It's not as pretty as Shake, it's based on the fltk UI toolkit, right?? But it's a pure, no-nonsense interface.


truly,
if they iron out the little thing then Nuke it is gonna be a very serious contender. After playing with the 3d in fusion 5.1 learning edition I have to say that a lack of lighs and shading is fairly disapointing. I've heard tell that the features are still there but need to accessed via the tcl command.

You can invoke ReLight as a tcl command but it doesn't work at the moment. I've heard good things are coming though.

beaker
03-12-2007, 03:34 AM
The problem isn't the toolkit, I could care less if the buttons are beveled or not. The issue is the damn floating windows. Luckily they added the window where all the attributes collect and stack up on top of each other. Still annoying though that have to go through and close 20 controls.

Scary as it sounds, I would rather it was a little closer to ICY's ui, which allows it to be either floating windows like Nuke or docked windows in a container like Shake.

Hopefully they port the whole Furnace set to OFX because at the moment the Shake version still has the most complete toolset.

taffy77
03-12-2007, 03:45 AM
Ive sseveral issues with the interface.

1. Its not intuative.
2. Floating Windows
3. The need to have to use the hotkeys to do anything. ( I am lazy and like to rest my left hand:)
4. How masks work.
5. The visual representaion of the flowgraph - by this I mean that in shake you can look at the flowgrapg of another user and can almost figure iout what they are doing without having to open up the menus.

I could go on but all i can see is I am excited by the prospect of fresh eyes looking over the software. Nuke is very powerful but with some help it could be so much better and with a new UI and better doc's this will be the case.

instinct-vfx
03-12-2007, 09:35 AM
After having a quick introduction i actually found nuke very intuitive. Floating windows is a matter of taste i assume. I usually hate them (wich is part of my mac-hate :P) but i found them pretty cleverly implemented in nuke. I would definately love to see docking tho! You dont have to use hotkeys for everything (tho there's more then in other apps i assume) but they make working so much quicker once one's got the hang of the daily shortcuts.
Masks are truely weird somewhat, but are also pretty nice to work with after getting used to it. What do you mean by the "visual representation" of the DAG ? The layer and channels system does make things harder to understand at first glimpse, but on the other hand it's a VERY powerful part of nuke, and after a while of working with it and getting used to the small icons and leds in the nodes i found it rather comfortable. And i couldnt disagree more on beeing able to understand other ppl's flowgraph on first glimpse in any app, esp shake. Some ppl here got some really weird ways of doing things :D

Regards,
Thorsten

Blur1
03-12-2007, 11:07 AM
Nuke is very powerful but with some help it could be so much better and with a new UI and better doc's this will be the case.

I totally agree about the docs. Also this discussion has made me think about a pet peeve. It's not apparent to me how you can find out the bit depth of any footage you read in. If you hit "i" you get loads of info but it seems you don't get that.

castelis
03-12-2007, 11:20 AM
Whenever you read a clip into a script, it is automatically converted to
NUKE’s native colorspace, which is 32-bit per channel RGB, a linear format.
This conversion takes place even if the clip you read in is in the
Kodak Cineon format, which is a logarithmic format.

Regardless of format, NUKE converts all imported sequences to its
native 32-bit sRGB colorspace.

Blur1
03-12-2007, 01:41 PM
Whenever you read a clip into a script, it is automatically converted to
NUKE’s native colorspace, which is 32-bit per channel RGB, a linear format.
This conversion takes place even if the clip you read in is in the
Kodak Cineon format, which is a logarithmic format.

Regardless of format, NUKE converts all imported sequences to its
native 32-bit sRGB colorspace.

Yes I know but it's still important to know what the dynamic range of the source image is.

Kai01W
03-12-2007, 02:52 PM
Yes I know but it's still important to know what the dynamic range of the source image is.
I agree, although I would not call it "dynamic range" but simply "bit depth".

-k

PiXeL_MoNKeY
03-12-2007, 08:25 PM
I think the real question is how much of the dev team went over with the code? If little or none, how much will this slow development of the tool?

-Eric

BillSpradlin
03-12-2007, 10:23 PM
I think the real question is how much of the dev team went over with the code? If little or none, how much will this slow development of the tool?

-Eric

The full details of this transaction aren't released yet as the lawyers are still doing their thing. Expect to hear more about it later on. Can't say anything more, sorry =)

jubba
03-12-2007, 10:30 PM
I think the real question is how much of the dev team went over with the code? If little or none, how much will this slow development of the tool?

-Eric

Got this from the Foundry web site:

The number of staff in our engineering department is already expanding to ensure we have teams dedicated to both plug-in development and the development of NUKE. As part of this expansion we are delighted to welcome Bill Spitzak, the primary author of NUKE and Matt Plec, formerly of Sony Pictures Imageworks as key members of the NUKE development team.

So it sounds like two imports from LA are heading over to London. Hope they've been here before - it'll be a bit of a change from Venice and Culver City ;-)

From the posts on this forum it sounds like the first thing to address is the UI. In London the big four VFX facilities (MPC, Dneg, FS-CFC and Cinesite) are all heavy Shake users - I guesstimate the total number of installed GUIs to be around 800 with at least five times as many render nodes - there's a lot of inertia there, a lot of reluctance to commit to change. However, all of them have to be looking for a Shake replacement somewhere in the next two years. All of these companies are big customers of the Foundry and there's a lot of trust there. If the Foundry could come up with a version of Nuke that's essentially a straight swap for Shake in the London pipelines then there's around one million pounds (twiddles finger at the corner of the mouth) in sales to be made just within the Soho post production community. That'd pay the bar tab at DeHems for a couple of weeks...

j

beaker
03-12-2007, 11:43 PM
The nice thing with Bill is he is the creator of api FLTK(Fast Light Toolkit) that Nuke uses. So maybe this will push the tool kit a little more and benefit everyone.

saltchrome
03-17-2007, 09:12 PM
My guess is that this acquisition will help 2.5d compositing programs attain true 3d compositing.I bet there will be some sort of 3d environment rollout just given the way foundry works.

beaker
03-17-2007, 09:14 PM
My guess is that this acquisition will help 2.5d compositing programs attain true 3d compositing.I bet there will be some sort of 3d environment rollout just given the way foundry works.I don't understand what you mean by this? All current compositors have a full 3d compositing workspace these days.

saltchrome
03-17-2007, 09:49 PM
Obj import, projection mapping, recreation of 3d scenes in 3d. The moving of 2d elements thru 3d space using a 3d virtual camera is 2.5d. This is because the objects are 2d representations, flat images that mimic 3d perspective, hope this helps...

BillSpradlin
03-17-2007, 10:00 PM
Obj import, projection mapping, recreation of 3d scenes in 3d. The moving of 2d elements thru 3d space using a 3d virtual camera is 2.5d. This is because the objects are 2d representations, flat images that mimic 3d perspective, hope this helps...

Again, I'm echoing Beaker's response as I don't quite understand. Nuke's 3D is just that 3D, it's not a virtual camera by any means.

saltchrome
03-17-2007, 10:32 PM
Right, you are correct Nuke 3d is 3d as is digital fusion. After Effects, Shake and Combustion are not. They are what is referred to as 2.5d. Foundry acquires Nuke. Foundry makes 3rd party apps for AE, combustion etc. For example keylight for AE... Hopefully, there will be some sort of 3rd party integration into 2.5d compositing apps, via this acquisition, that will enable some of the features of Nuke.

beaker
03-18-2007, 01:49 AM
Right, you are correct Nuke 3d is 3d as is digital fusion. After Effects, Shake and Combustion are not. They are what is referred to as 2.5d. They were a many years ago, but AE added full 3d in 6.0 about 4 years ago, Shake added full 3d space in 4.0 about 2 years ago. While they are limited, they are 100% 3d space and can import obj models and 3d camera from maya(or any other matchmover).

saltchrome
03-18-2007, 04:50 AM
You can't import 3d models into after effects, what are you talking about? You can import camera data but again it is 3d camera information functioning on 2.5d layers.

Just so it is super clear to you, the layers in after effects and other compositing programs can be 3d enabled and utilize z axis information, however they are not 3d, rofl!

The only time you can import a model into after effects is with zaxwerks invigorator, which is a 3rd party plugin and it gives super, super limited functionality. But then this is what I have been saying from the beginning, I think you are arguing for the sake of arguing. I think you realized the mistake you made earlier and you are trying to bail out or something, lol.

fr3drik
03-18-2007, 07:01 PM
It was quite some time ago they made the floating windows gather in the control panel bin, which I think works very well! No need to focus on changing the UI if you ask me.

And there's no need to close down 20 controls manually. Just right-click on the control panel bin and close them all at once.

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