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blaze21
02-22-2007, 10:23 PM
hi,

i'm doing a research paper on the algorithm used in 3d software fo simulating physics dynamic. Do you know where i can find some information about it ?

jchat
02-28-2007, 03:16 PM
I have paper about crack. A crack appears when the internal stresses of a material are greater than the materail resistance.I think you can use it.

You can search this paper at www.google.co.th (http://www.google.co.th/)

- Generating Surface Crack Patterns.
- Procedural Modeling of Cracks and Fractures.

Robert Bateman
03-01-2007, 05:54 AM
i'm doing a research paper on the algorithm used in 3d software fo simulating physics dynamic. Do you know where i can find some information about it ?

There is no one 'does everything' algorithm as such, and the algorithms used depend on what you are using 3D software for. For example, pro-E and other engineering packages use much more complex finite element analysis to determine breaking points of materials etc.

3D animation software will tend to use more generic iterative solutions to be found in off the shelf physics engines (XSI can use either ODE or PhysX for example). Both of those engines pretty much support rigid body dynamics (lagrange or featherstone methods) and that's about it (with a few extensions available for cloth etc in physX); however with animation software it's about getting the 'look' quickly, so physical accuracy is not always needed.

Ian Jones
03-02-2007, 01:48 AM
I agree with Robert, and suggest you focus your analysis. Simulation in engineering / maths can be quite different from the needs of realtime such as visualisation / gaming.

blaze21
03-05-2007, 11:41 PM
thanks every body

Actaully i'm just interrested in algorithm specialized for the visualisation like the one that are in used by software like blender.
do you know if those are exactly the same as the ones used in games beacause they seem to be a lot of books about it.

djwarder
03-06-2007, 09:45 AM
What types of simulation?

HollyWoodland
03-07-2007, 09:30 AM
you might find some of Ron Fedkiw's work interesting

http://graphics.stanford.edu/~fedkiw/

he has covered several different topics from fluid dynamics to breaking thin shelled objects. It's by no means a comprehensive coverage of all CG but it's an interesting starting point

if you're looking for the most cutting edge stuff there was an interesting article in a recent issue of 3D World - it covered the 7 newest technologies for 2007

blaze21
03-07-2007, 03:56 PM
for those interrested i also found a page this really good page (http://www-etud.iro.umontreal.ca/%7Eclavetsi/physicsingraphics-details.html)

H3ro
03-07-2007, 04:22 PM
for those interrested i also found a page this really good page (http://www-etud.iro.umontreal.ca/%7Eclavetsi/physicsingraphics-details.html)

Looks like a great page, thanks

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