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Ultragames
02-02-2007, 12:18 AM
I haven't been doing much of anything in the way of digital art for a long time. I have been sticking to web design and programming. I certainly know my way around photoshop very well, but now things have changed. I purchased a Wacom tablet recently, and I want to get back into 2D paintings. The problem is, is that all of the Photoshop things I do now are for websites, and i feel like I have no clue where to start in the digital painting world.


Are there any tutorials out there that teach the basics behind creating various things in Photoshop. Specificly ones that use a wacom pad? I want to paint dragons, and landscapes, and flowers, and people, and various objects, but I need a few starter tutorials so taht I can learn how to get the right shapes, color dynamics, brush sizes etc. out of my pen and tablet.

If anyone has anything they can link me to, that would be great.
Thank you.

wwwwoody
02-02-2007, 12:43 PM
I haven't been doing much of anything in the way of digital art for a long time. I have been sticking to web design and programming. I certainly know my way around photoshop very well, but now things have changed. I purchased a Wacom tablet recently, and I want to get back into 2D paintings. The problem is, is that all of the Photoshop things I do now are for websites, and i feel like I have no clue where to start in the digital painting world.


Are there any tutorials out there that teach the basics behind creating various things in Photoshop. Specificly ones that use a wacom pad? I want to paint dragons, and landscapes, and flowers, and people, and various objects, but I need a few starter tutorials so taht I can learn how to get the right shapes, color dynamics, brush sizes etc. out of my pen and tablet.

If anyone has anything they can link me to, that would be great.
Thank you.


i mean, that you want to know know-how :-) everybody have diferent technique, own brushes etc. you may look on Bob Cato tutorials (for example) or some others

"right shape" ? lol :-)

this is my sketch: http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=418562

This picture was made in Photoshop, I used only basic brush and smudge tool.

GL

Datameister
02-02-2007, 09:59 PM
The tablet isn't your problem; Photoshop is. You want to learn how to use Photoshop with greater skill.

Try first this article (http://wiki.cgsociety.org/index.php/Photoshop) I wrote for the CGWiki. Sorry to be a self-promoter, but I wrote it just for people who are in your position--you know what you want to do, but you don't know how to make the program do what you want. That article is intended to be a primer in the most fundamental techniques of digital painting in Photoshop.

Remember, digital painting is a process that varies greatly between artists. You have to figure out what works for you. My suggestion: pick just a couple of simple, hard-edged brushes with Opacity Jitter and Flow Jitter set to Pen Pressure, and just start painting. Paint things you have on your desk or in your refrigerator or outside your window or in photos. (The "Digital Painting in PS" thread in the Photoshop forum of conceptart.org/forums contains several years' worth of such studies from various artists.) Post your work here and get critiques; you'll improve, slowly but very surely.

At its heart, digital painting is a simple process. You pick a brush, you pick a color, and you paint. Nothing more to it than that, necessarily. Smudging and color corrections and advanced layer use and blending modes and so on are truly great, but they're not essential to the painting process. For now, just use a hard-edged brush and try. You can adjust the size of the brush using [ and ] so that you can achieve any shape imaginable. Just keep at it and don't give up.

Ultragames
02-07-2007, 06:56 PM
Photoshop is not the problem. I am a graphic designer. The things your tutorial covers like brush sizes, hot keys, etc. are all very very basic to me. I need to know how to get the full power out of my Wacom in Photoshop.

Also, i suppose what I really need are drawing lessons. But I would preffer one that focuses on digital drawing, and using a Wacom.

Anyone?

Diabolos
02-07-2007, 08:16 PM
Just in case, here is a link to wacom - they have some tuts.


http://www.wacom.com/tips/index.cfm?category=photoshop

D,

Datameister
02-08-2007, 09:47 AM
Photoshop is not the problem. I am a graphic designer. The things your tutorial covers like brush sizes, hot keys, etc. are all very very basic to me. I need to know how to get the full power out of my Wacom in Photoshop.

Also, i suppose what I really need are drawing lessons. But I would preffer one that focuses on digital drawing, and using a Wacom.

I'm sorry, but you're going to need to be a little more specific about what you want. Using a Wacom to make marks in Photoshop is about as intuitive as using a pencil to make marks on paper--press, and the mark appears. You can use "Wacom Tablet Properties" in the Control Panel to configure settings, but that's all a matter of personal preference.

What I was trying to say is that using a Wacom is, in and of itself, quite simple. But the way you use the program is the part that can be difficult to figure out, even if you've been using Photoshop for years. The program-specific techniques make a huge difference on how your art looks. You said you want to "learn how to get the right shapes, color dynamics, brush sizes etc." These are all Photoshop issues, not tablet issues.

Trust me, dude. I used Photoshop for seven years, doing mostly graphic design and photomanipulation. Then I started painting in the program, and my first attempts looked like they were done by someone who'd never touched a computer--not to mention a paintbrush--before. It's a totally different skill set. So...my advice is still the same. Pick one simple brush, such as the one I describe in the third paragraph of the Brushes section of the article, and just start painting. Look at what you've made, decide what needs to be done differently, and try something different. Post your work here for critique, too.

I think the only tablet-specific thing I have to tell you is that it's better to make big, fast movements than small, slow ones. Small movements on the tablet surface tend to look jittery onscreen, especially with smaller tablets. So when line quality is important, use lots of arm to make swift, large strokes. Zoom into your painting so you can use bigger movements.

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