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Jadetiger
01-25-2007, 06:44 PM
Is there any tool or technique in Photoshop that allows you to take a very pixely sketchy line, and average it out to make one bold dynamic stroke. For example, this was a sketch I scanned in and it got very pixely when I adjusted the levels to get rid of the wrinkles and shadows and other unwated marks on the paper. Is there a way photoshop can recognize the general shape of the stroke and fill it in nice and bold? I don't like using a blur of any kind cause then the whole thing looks fuzzy and awful. I would like to go for a nice clean vector type look. I could go into Illustrator, use the pen tool, and correct that, but I was hoping photoshop had an easier and mainly quicker way of doing that. I appreciate any comments and tips.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y4/Jadetigerffxi/LineSketchy.jpg
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y4/Jadetigerffxi/MonsterGloves.jpg

BlueFlare
01-28-2007, 05:04 PM
You could try Filter/Other/Minumum (1 pixel), followed by Edit/Fade Minimum.
I can't say I'm happy with the result, but maybe you are.

To be honest, if you want to do it the right way; manual trace your sketches in a program like Illustrator. Then color the result in either Illustrator or Photoshop. Personally I would do the whole sketch in Illustrator; you get a clean look and the image will be fully scalable.

Jadetiger
02-01-2007, 08:27 AM
You could try Filter/Other/Minumum (1 pixel), followed by Edit/Fade Minimum.
I can't say I'm happy with the result, but maybe you are.

To be honest, if you want to do it the right way; manual trace your sketches in a program like Illustrator. Then color the result in either Illustrator or Photoshop. Personally I would do the whole sketch in Illustrator; you get a clean look and the image will be fully scalable.

Thanks for your response. I'll try that. I used to do all my outlines in Illustrator. I just found it very very tedious. It probably is the best bet. Or I could just work on cleaning my drawings up a little more. ;)

Datameister
02-02-2007, 09:03 PM
Just re-ink it manually in Photoshop, using a hard-edged (and anti-aliased!) brush. Use swift, confident strokes that originate from the elbow and shoulder, preferably working on a new layer so you can erase mistakes or parts of lines that "overshoot." It may take a few tries, but you can do it.

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