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Onder
12-09-2006, 08:38 PM
"Long ago, a matte painting was artwork painted on glass through which the movie set was filmed. With glass matte paintings, only a tiny part of the movie set is created physically, just for the area where the actors are. Everything else is a painting on a piece of glass between the camera and the actors (which today can be created with 3D models, not just paintings.) "

-------I am trying to find some articles about "The History of Matte Paintings", to be honest there is non in the web. All i can find is that paragraph, even in this forum as i search.. if you add some knowledge or link..... it will be much appreciated.. Thank you------

JJASSO
12-10-2006, 07:29 PM
about the history as you said there are almost none articles about it, but the best resource is not online , craig barron and marlk cotta vaz are the authors of the invisible art book, acomplete illustrated book about the begining to the actual days a must have.http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/customer-reviews/0811831361

some resource about it by craig barron from matte world digital
http://www.matteworld.com/projects/siggraph01.html

you can check www.mattepainting.org (http://www.mattepainting.org) is the best place of resources in this art

Onder
12-11-2006, 03:45 PM
about the history as you said there are almost none articles about it, but the best resource is not online , craig barron and marlk cotta vaz are the authors of the invisible art book, acomplete illustrated book about the begining to the actual days a must have.http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/customer-reviews/0811831361

some resource about it by craig barron from matte world digital
http://www.matteworld.com/projects/siggraph01.html

you can check www.mattepainting.org (http://www.mattepainting.org) is the best place of resources in this art

Thank you so much for your interest but i already read that articles. They are half true and at www.mattepainting.com , most of all only try to improve how best painters they are by show off their stolen works.. Funny thing is they cant define what kinda art they are doing..

Whatever and however i"ll share here my "research" of matte painting's history that i am making for a Digital Art magazine in different language. Maybe someone interest and read this article.. Thanks again, for your comment..

Onder
12-11-2006, 03:52 PM
Introduction
Since the advent of motion pictures, filmmakers have endeavored to transport the
viewers to fantastic worlds, different times, and far away places. Tools and techniques
for achieving these illusions have evolved during the short history of the cinematic art
form such as miniature sets, stop-motion animation, computer generated characters and
environments, among many others. Matte paintings are one of the oldest and most
effective special effects. These highly detailed paintings have a tradition that stems from
hundreds of years ago. In the theater flat planes of wood and canvas were painted to add
depth and realism to a stage set; during the Renaissance master artists created the most
realistic art of their time using newly developed proficiency in perspective, perception,
light, shadow, and color.

A successful matte painting is one that is never noticed. It is a two-dimensional
image which is seamlessly integrated with other shot elements, creating a composite.
Chris Evans, an Industrial Light and Magic (ILM) matte painter, aptly described matte
painting as a magic trick: "The magician moves his wand to divert attention while the
other hand does the trick. With the matte artist, the live-action plate is the diverting,
moving wand, and the painting is the trick hand."

The Story of Matte Paintings

*** The story of matte paintings began in Paris during the 1890s with the first public
screenings of motion pictures. No stranger to illusion, magician turned filmmaker
Georges Mlis used huge paintings as backgrounds for his sets and employed mirror
tricks cultivated from his stage performances as some of the first "special effects" in his
groundbreaking films. Mlis work and tutelage inspired Norman Dawn, widely
regarded as the father of matte paintings. At the age of 12, Dawn was using a camera
obscura as a projection mechanism for sketching environments. He would often change
locations but remain working on the same sheet of paper, combining different elements
of new projections into a final composite drawing.

While working as a still photographer in1905, Dawn was assigned to photograph a building which unfortunately had a light pole obstructing his composition. "A photoengraver named Max Handsheigl suggested to Dawn that instead of going through a laborious retouching of a photo, he mount a sheet of glass between camera and building, paint a tree over the offending pole, and photograph glass image and building together. It was an old still-photography technique that predated cinema, but a revelation to Dawn" (Vaz and Barron 2002). This simple yet ingenious solution became the basis for set of artistic techniques that would go almost unchanged for nearly a hundred years.

****(A Thesis by Nathan Charles Bowden- - May, 2005

(will go on)

Onder
12-11-2006, 05:57 PM
(by Vaz and Barron, 2002)

While working on the film California Missions in 1907, Dawn set up his camera,
composed a shot, and set up a pane of glass in front of the camera and proceeded to paint "restored" Spanish missions over the existing remains. When he wasnt
literally fighting other filmmakers (competition was so fierce physical altercations often
took place), he was constantly going back and forth from the painting to the camera to
make sure that the painting was blending as seamlessly as possible with the "practical"
site. By all accounts this was the first time that this technique was ever used for a motion
picture.Glass Shot Setup Illustration. 1927, known as the "glass matte" technique, one of its
limitations was that thepaintings and camera had to be literally bolted down on location; the painting created on the spot. This issue was resolved years later with a technique Dawn called "original negative," which was inspired by director Edwin Porters The Great Train Robbery. "Dawn used hand-cut cardboard mattes over his camera to block exposure of the areas of film reserved for the glass-painted image, which he could now create in the comfort of his studio. After rewinding the same roll of film with which hed photographed the live-action, he could then expose the finished painting, producing a single image effect" (Vaz and Barron 2002)

From a production standpoint, this process provided a much easier
means of compositing live action elements and matte paintings. However, the
convenience of being able to produce the matte paintings offsite was marred by the
possibility that the separate exposures might not line up properly, causing a jittering
effect that Dawn called "weave." This issue plagued Dawns Story of the Andes so much
that it caused him to return to onsite glass mattes. It took three years for the camera
precision technology, specifically the "registration needed to accurately line up the
exposures," to catch up with the filmmakers ambitions. This advance allowed him to
return to the original negative technique .The Bell and Howard 2709 motion picture camera featured precision registration pins, which allowed separate film elements to be accurately composited in-camera. This enabled Dawn to combine original negative and glass paintings into a new hybrid. Instead of painting the final image on the locked down, pane of glass on site, he merely painted a solid black matte. This was much faster than painting the final image and less cumbersome than using cut pieces of cardboard as mattes. The final paintings were created back at the studio using the same camera model featuring a custom "optical system, [which] allowed him to view the matte board on which hed create his paintings while simultaneously viewing a strip of live-action test film in the camera aperture" (Vaz and Barron 2002).

Another variation of this technique was featured in the 1924 film,
Master of Women, while Dawn was working at the Louis B. Mayer film company. The
final composite featured a dog team trekking through a glacial wilderness with a whaling
ship in the background. The first exposure on the film was the live-action footage, and
the second exposure combined a miniature ship and a glass matte painting. This final
composite succeeded in its own right as a special effect, but when viewed by industry
mogul Marcus Loew through the optical setup at the studio, it prompted the acquisition
of the Mayer company forming Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M.G.M.).

The following years brought both success and turmoil to Dawn, and the rapidly
maturing film industry. In 1918 Dawn patented his technique of "cinematographic
picture composition" and in 1921 he filed an extremely unpopular lawsuit against rival
painter Ferdinand Earle and other parties who were yet to be mentioned for copyright
infringement. Those parties not identified in the suit eventually became most of the
major companies in Hollywood. The case went on until 1924, when it was dismissed.
Dawn later disclosed that his employer had forced him to sell his patent to M.G.M. for
$10,000; a price Dawn argued was far too low. After some "youll never work in this
town again if you dont" arm twisting, he acquiesced and sold the patent. M.G.M. made
the technique publicly available, ending the legal controversy.

Dawns contributions to the history of matte painting cannot be overstated. More
often than once, it took technology a few years to catch up to his creativity and
imagination. Ideas that were abandoned because of technological limitations, like rear
projection (originally intended for Dawns The Drifter) were realized to great effect
years later. His pioneering efforts forged the basis for the analog matte paintings and
compositing techniques used for the next 60 years. He also helped to inspire the
paradigms for digital approaches that are used today.

jussing
12-14-2006, 09:56 AM
-------I am trying to find some articles about "The History of Matte Paintings", to be honest there is non in the web. All i can find is that paragraph, even in this forum as i search.. if you add some knowledge or link..... it will be much appreciated.. Thank you------There is a PowerPoint presentation here that might help you:
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=429348

More pictures than text, though. And I agree with Jasso, get Mark Cotta Vaz's book! It's the best matte paiting resource ever.

- Jonas

Onder
12-14-2006, 10:31 AM
There is a PowerPoint presentation here that might help you:
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=429348

More pictures than text, though. And I agree with Jasso, get Mark Cotta Vaz's book! It's the best matte paiting resource ever.

- Jonas

Thank you so much but i already read it too. Anyway this became a "research" for me, now i have many meterials about that i donno if anyone interested, that is why didnt continue but if admins interest or wants later i will make a pdf book Maybe someone, any student use it later. very hard to find such knowledges

jussing
12-14-2006, 10:48 AM
very hard to find such knowledges
Well, I'd say the Mark Cotta Vaz book is packed with knowledge. :) It just isn't available for free download.

But if you want to put your research somewhere accessible, you can update the Wikipedia article:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matte_painting

- Jonas

JJASSO
12-14-2006, 06:28 PM
that's a very important research you're doing mybe if you get that pdf book we can do a sticky thread about the matte painting history so everyone interested can investigate and learn more about this important art

Onder
12-14-2006, 06:55 PM
that's a very important research you're doing mybe if you get that pdf book we can do a sticky thread about the matte painting history so everyone interested can investigate and learn more about this important art

Then instead of writing here as messages, i am making a pdf book and send you. This will be better and becomes first in net.

cgoz
12-15-2006, 09:14 AM
those are really useful articles...btw a few months ago 2dartist magazine published an article about history of matte painting.you can check that out.
cheers...

ps. i'll be waiting for digital arts magazine, that's gonna be cool

Onder
12-15-2006, 09:52 AM
those are really useful articles...btw a few months ago 2dartist magazine published an article about history of matte painting.you can check that out.
cheers...

ps. i'll be waiting for digital arts magazine, that's gonna be cool

To be honest i made very wide "research" and read many articles about Matte Painting history and also i read that too. Almost all of them (in my research %99.9) depends on the same book, Vaz and Barron, The Invisible Art: The Legends of Move Matte, 2002, which is only 1 book ever published about Matte Painting (history) very well known.

But in my opinion and also what my research says, it is half true only. As i attached a few paragraf from this book, he shows the reality also but he depends some other factors. That is why i wanted to use English version of my research here, as we will publish it Turkish in our magazine Digital Arts and shows the genuine.

I mostly agree with Vaz and Barron, but i cant say that i am on the same way of thinking Matte Painting first used in public..

it is older then what they said, and we ll show all the proof in the "Matte Painting series" and also much detailed PDF English-Turkish version that i am creating it's pages right now.. it will be the first, and i hope it wont be the last..

I am sure, you enjoy with it.. and it will be good to discuss some technical details also together.

by the way, hope to see you tomorrow (or sunday) in the Digital Arts Magazine Workshop in Bilmer.. :-)

Bonman
12-15-2006, 10:30 PM
Hello, Onder

I was just surfing around the pages and saw your thread. I must say that your research about matte painting maybe quite good, but Im sorry to say its not the first; for example, I was doing a deep research about mattes a few years ago (wich is a subject Im really keen on) as an ending for my doctoral studies at UCLM University in Spain, where I submit and published in 2002 a pre-doctorate research book about history of cinematic virtual simulation, from classic matte painting to digital 3d environments.

Youre right about how difficult is to find info on mattes on the web, but I must say this info exists, and I was lucky (and constant) enough to find help from many people around the world involved with the history or practise in mattes, kind enough to contrinute with images, data or interviews.

Of course theres that Barron/Vaz book (a pure jewel I met from an artist that appeared on it), but there are other books too about history of VFX that also dedicate chapters to mattes, all together with dozens of websites with examples, making of, brief histories, interviews...

Now, after a period with hard professional duties, Im just about to publish in Spain a new book updated with all that data and short tutorials about the matte painting world.

Ill keep you informed

regards

Manuel

Onder
12-15-2006, 11:17 PM
Hello, Onder

I was just surfing around the pages and saw your thread. I must say that your research about matte painting maybe quite good, but Im sorry to say its not the first; for example, I was doing a deep research about mattes a few years ago (wich is a subject Im really keen on) as an ending for my doctoral studies at UCLM University in Spain, where I submit and published in 2002 a pre-doctorate research book about history of cinematic virtual simulation, from classic matte painting to digital 3d environments.

Youre right about how difficult is to find info on mattes on the web, but I must say this info exists, and I was lucky (and constant) enough to find help from many people around the world involved with the history or practise in mattes, kind enough to contrinute with images, data or interviews.

Of course theres that Barron/Vaz book (a pure jewel I met from an artist that appeared on it), but there are other books too about history of VFX that also dedicate chapters to mattes, all together with dozens of websites with examples, making of, brief histories, interviews...

Now, after a period with hard professional duties, Im just about to publish in Spain a new book updated with all that data and short tutorials about the matte painting world.

Ill keep you informed

regards

Manuel

It is very nice of you to inform me about that. I am excited to read your research also. To be honest, i read many books, web pages, doctoral studies......... I hope, I wish, your "doctoral studies" or "book" not about only "cinematic virtual simulation" as Vaz and Barron or the others did.

As we all know that, Matte Painting is neither a film making technique, nor just an effect nor backround painting..

I hope, i wish you give a CERTAIN answer to the others who Confused about;

-what is retouch
-what is dubbing
-what is photo-montage
-and what is the difference between matte-painting..

also where this Matte-painting comes from,
who gave it s name,
what is the first matte painting work..

We cant explain it as "old" spirit technique because it is just a photo-montage. And we cant limit it with cinema only, as we ALL know again..

Because there is NON in the world yet who answered these questions clearly. Or i am not careful enough to see or someone hiding knowledges.

It is not important for me to being first anyway (PS: it is first for us to give articles as a book - like this way and i hope it wont be last)

I am just looking for the Truth..

As i told i am really excited to read your book also..

Thank you so much for your information..

Onder

timwarnock
12-15-2006, 11:48 PM
There are sveral excelent DVDs from Gnomon that go into great depth on digital matte painting techniques. I haven't seen them all yet but of the ones I have seen the Dylan Cole DVDs really stand out. Very clear and easy to follow.
Hope that helps,
Cheers,
Tim

Onder
12-20-2006, 02:59 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image%3ABrueghel-tower-of-babel.jpghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e1/Brueghel-tower-of-babel.jpg/795px-Brueghel-tower-of-babel.jpg

The Tower of Babel oil on board is an oil painting by Pieter Brueghel the Elder in 1563. Its subject is the construction of the Tower of Babel, which according to the Bible was a tower built by humanity to reach heaven..
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image%3ABrueghel-tower-of-babel.jpg

A fantasy world.. imagination.. very similar to matte painting main idea and technique..

Can we say that it is the first matte painting ?? and Brueghel was father of matte painting ??
Of course NOT... This is only a painting in Landscape genre....

This is from my research and just wanted to share here. Because there is really a "definition" mess..

why this pdf took that long as 1 week ?? because of my english :-) still working on, to make it best.. I am sure you will like..

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