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View Full Version : A Terabyte of Data on a Regular DVD?


RobertoOrtiz
12-08-2006, 09:17 PM
Quote:
"
Imagine taking the entire collection of historical documents at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum and storing it on a single DVD.

University of Central Florida Chemistry Professor Kevin D. Belfield and his team have cracked a puzzle that stumped scientists for more than a dozen years. They have developed a new technology that will allow users to record and store massive amounts of data -- the museum’s entire collection or as many as 500 movies, for example -- onto a single disc or, perhaps, a small cube.

Belfield’s Two-Photon 3-D Optical Data Storage system makes this possible."

>>LINK<< (http://news.ucf.edu/UCFnews/index?page=article&id=0024004105bd60439010c0c76ce2f00409b)

-R

GatorNic
12-08-2006, 09:26 PM
its cool and all, but when they work on stuff like this can they also work on a "scratchless" dvds as well?

"oops, I scratched it. Damn I lost a quarter of the library!"

eliseu gouveia
12-08-2006, 10:09 PM
I´m still trying to understand why DVDs don´t come encased like diskettes used to.

A stain of food and there goes your USD$60 videogame.

siouxfire
12-08-2006, 10:15 PM
One day there will be 100 disk spindles of terrabyte DVDs just around the corner from the Super High Definition IMAX televisions.

GatorNic
12-08-2006, 10:22 PM
One day there will be 100 disk spindles of terrabyte DVDs just around the corner from the Super High Definition IMAX televisions.

nevermid that..where is my flying car and my hoverboard!!! :thumbsup:

siouxfire
12-08-2006, 10:28 PM
nevermid that..where is my flying car and my hoverboard!!! :thumbsup:
LOL - And the follow-up to Vista should be in beta by that point along with Autodesk's latest release of XSI and Lightwave.

Dennik
12-08-2006, 10:30 PM
I bet my head that this technology will become available to us after many many many many little steps-upgrades, just so that they milk our pocket along the way, like they always do.

bardur
12-09-2006, 01:13 AM
its cool and all, but when they work on stuff like this can they also work on a "scratchless" dvds as well?

"oops, I scratched it. Damn I lost a quarter of the library!"

Well.. you can allways use the Kodak gold coating.... itll last up to 300 years.. and even with scratches... or something like that... :D
http://www.betanews.com/article/New_CDs_DVDs_Could_Last_300_Years/1145378116

and.. im indeed looking forward to this technology, its a big breakthrough in the history of storage.. :buttrock:

Regards

Szos
12-09-2006, 02:22 AM
its cool and all, but when they work on stuff like this can they also work on a "scratchless" dvds as well?

"oops, I scratched it. Damn I lost a quarter of the library!"

Ahem, brother!

And one of the main reasons why I sooo hope that Blu-Ray does not become the next disc standard - it's discs are even more prone to scratches because SONY made the protective coating thinner than on regular DVDs. Such a bad decision, just so they can trump up the capacity of their media... at the cost of durability. http://forums.cgsociety.org/images/icons/icon14.gif

madheavy
12-09-2006, 02:48 AM
Do you really think that they want DVDs to last forever, do you really think that they want to make them durable and scratch-resistant?
That goes against the capitalistic way. They love, they relish, the fact the CDs, DVDs, are so easily damaged. That way you can go out and by that beloved DVD again.
The car industry is the same way.
If they could design a DVD to self-destruct after 25 uses, I wouldn't doubt the industry would be doing it...secretely at least.

Terabytes on one disc? Sounds appealing. That means we can save more garbage that we'll never ever look at for someone else to never ever look at.

P_T
12-09-2006, 03:22 AM
I´m still trying to understand why DVDs don´t come encased like diskettes used to.

A stain of food and there goes your USD$60 videogame.You mean like this? ;)
http://www.biohemma.nu/bilder/Blandat/bluray-disc.jpg

BillB
12-09-2006, 04:00 AM
I´m still trying to understand why DVDs don´t come encased like diskettes used to.
A stain of food and there goes your USD$60 videogame.
Dude - what the hell are you eating!? Just wash it off, man!

ienrdna
12-09-2006, 01:22 PM
how long it takes to burn?!?!

Szos
12-09-2006, 02:13 PM
Do you really think that they want DVDs to last forever, do you really think that they want to make them durable and scratch-resistant?
That goes against the capitalistic way. They love, they relish, the fact the CDs, DVDs, are so easily damaged. That way you can go out and by that beloved DVD again.
The car industry is the same way.
If they could design a DVD to self-destruct after 25 uses, I wouldn't doubt the industry would be doing it...secretely at least.

Terabytes on one disc? Sounds appealing. That means we can save more garbage that we'll never ever look at for someone else to never ever look at.


GM invented the term for that back in the 50s or 60s - it's called Planned Obsolescence.

Oh and Circuit City dreamed up a DVD that would be unreadable after only 2 viewings (or something like that) - remember DIVX? (and I am not talking about the video codec either)

I just find it amazing that I have casette tapes that still sound perfectly fine that my parents used to listen to like 20 years ago! Good luck finding a CD or DVD in 20 years that still actually plays.

mech7
12-09-2006, 02:52 PM
The argument that it would be easier to loose allot of data is nonsense, if you can store huge amount of data on 1 disk it is also possible to create much easier several backup copies if needed if something happened to one of them.

jbradley
12-09-2006, 10:56 PM
Belfield’s Two-Photon 3-D Optical Data Storage system makes this possible."

At technologically neat as it is, there's no way they cracked a 'puzzle'.

Scientists were working on prototype systems like this when I was in school for optical engineering '93-'97. I even had the opportunity to work on some holographic storage solutions (a 1mm cube of crystal for holographic storage) and started working (for a planned thesis) on 3d data storage with spherical media (flat media is a thing of the past!).

The optics have always been there, it's the mechanical limitations that stifle the progress.

still, i find the stuff fascinating.

BillB
12-10-2006, 03:24 AM
I just find it amazing that I have casette tapes that still sound perfectly fine that my parents used to listen to like 20 years ago! Good luck finding a CD or DVD in 20 years that still actually plays. I've never heard a cassette tape that sounded perfectly fine ;)
And I have CDs that are getting pretty close to 20 years old that work fine. To be fair, audio CDs last better than data ones, better error correction/tolerance, and they're pressed rather than burned.

eliseu gouveia
12-10-2006, 05:10 AM
Dude - what the hell are you eating!? Just wash it off, man!

I refuse to give up on a perfect gahk! ;)

anakinbrego
12-11-2006, 07:25 AM
I bought a copy of L.A. Confidential back in 1997, when DVD's were first released in the states. A few weeks ago I wanted to watch it, and it froze up half way through. There isn't a single scratch on it, it's in perfect condition and it has been in a cabinet all these years and it hasn't been near any magnetic devices. I guess this is the first of many DVD's that will be going bad that I bought back in 1997, I really hope I'm wrong. :sad:

frogspasm
12-11-2006, 08:36 AM
it has been in a cabinet all these years and it hasn't been near any magnetic devices.

I'm pretty sure that you could store a CD or DVD on top of a magnet and nothing would happen. It's not a magnetic media like VHS or cassettes. The metallic layer on discs can oxidize over time, though. That is more likely what happened to your dvd. Good thing there's plenty of ways to make back-ups of your collection.

~M

Neil
12-11-2006, 03:06 PM
I remember reading in popular science about a new clear cover that you can put over the readable side of cds/dvds that protects like a lamination, yet the laser can still read through. That would solve your "food" accidents, yet I too don't understand what you're eatign that can't just be whipped off instead :)

jbradley
12-12-2006, 01:13 PM
I remember reading in popular science about a new clear cover that you can put over the readable side of cds/dvds that protects like a lamination, yet the laser can still read through. That would solve your "food" accidents, yet I too don't understand what you're eatign that can't just be whipped off instead :)

Honestly that's just a waste of money.

The data on optical media like CDs and DVDs is not written on the bottom of the disc. It's written through the bottom, but the active layer that is burned resides underneath the label. You can scratch the bottom all to hell and a high quality player will still be able to read the disc (sometimes slowly through due to optical error correction).

Scratch the label of your disc and you ruin it.

CDs and DVDs are not the smartest physically created media. They could've at least sandwitched a protective layer between the active layer and the label.

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