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v4vicky
12-04-2006, 01:14 PM
Can we Get Job for just knowing MEL and nothing else
nor modelling, nor max, anything?

brubin
12-04-2006, 05:55 PM
why not?
george w. got a well-paying job in washington,
and he knows even less and is reluctant to learn new things...
:D

grantimus
12-04-2006, 07:07 PM
Probably, it all depends on the studio. Some studios want people who know more than that, others would love a MEL specialist.

But if you're going to concentrate on MEL you should at least be familiar with other things. If your employer wants you to write a tool to help with rigging you had better know something about rigging. If your employer wants you to write a tool to help with environment creation you'll probably need to know some things about modeling, texturing, etc.

As with all things in life, the more you know the better off you'll be. But if you want a job doing nothing but MEL, I know there are positions like that out there. You'll probably have to do some hunting to find them. They aren't as common as positions for modelers or animators, but they are out there.

sparaig
12-04-2006, 11:47 PM
Probably, it all depends on the studio. Some studios want people who know more than that, others would love a MEL specialist.

But if you're going to concentrate on MEL you should at least be familiar with other things. If your employer wants you to write a tool to help with rigging you had better know something about rigging. If your employer wants you to write a tool to help with environment creation you'll probably need to know some things about modeling, texturing, etc.

As with all things in life, the more you know the better off you'll be. But if you want a job doing nothing but MEL, I know there are positions like that out there. You'll probably have to do some hunting to find them. They aren't as common as positions for modelers or animators, but they are out there.

What I'm trying to do is learn as much as I can about the basics of Maya and devise MEL tools to fill in the gaps for the existing modeling, etc., tools.

That way, I have a chance, slim as it might be for a 51-year-old newbie, to get SOME kind of job...

azshall
12-05-2006, 12:12 AM
I believe what he means is, if you know other areas of Maya (specifically if you're targeting MEL) then writing new tools may come a bit easier as you will know what things can break and what things you can benefit from.

Writing a script to do some stretchy arm/spine rig might be easy, but if you know nothing of Maya's Rigging tools, then it may be proven as much more difficult than say if you were already pretty decent with skinning and building skeletons. You might understand better and more efficient ways to start your script or even make a whole script knowing that information.

I tend to write a lot of Dynamics scripts, I know I could not write them if I did not know how Maya's dynamics engine(s) worked..

Seth

faultymoose
12-05-2006, 12:28 AM
Age has nothing to do with your suitability for a position - so long as you can do the work.
My first job in the industry was at the tender age of... 30-ish :) The concept that age in some way dictates your capacity to perform well is merely a remnant of industrialisation and the labor driven workforce. You might not be quite up to digging holes as fast as you could when you were 20 - and it's an unfortunate side effect of surpassing puberty that your brain doesn't soak things up as quickly as it used to - but if you can fit the position, you're as good for it as anyone else.

I would highly recommend gaining at least a rudimentary understanding of the processes involved in the entire production pipeline, because as a tool developer you will be much better prepared if you know exactly what kind of tools people want and need. You don't need to be an expert in rigging, or modelling, or animating, etc. but knowing how a task is accomplished will prepare you for the task of improving the existing Maya toolset. You'll build better cars if you know how to drive :)

Good luck!

v4vicky
12-06-2006, 08:05 PM
Some basics of others Fields only?
i.e.,
if we are planning for MEL
than we should concentrate in this field only
or there are chances that one may remain average
in our skills? (if we try to master more than one field,like animation, vfx, dynamics)
my friend says these words

Do you agree

neonoodle
12-07-2006, 11:01 PM
Just knowing MEL isn't very good, unless you have a good grasp of Maya along with it. I've created many MEL scripts and later found out that they've had simpler Maya equivalents later on, so my scripting was essentially a waste of time.

spairag said
"What I'm trying to do is learn as much as I can about the basics of Maya and devise MEL tools to fill in the gaps for the existing modeling, etc., tools."

This is related to the above, in that trying to devise tools with just a basic knowledge of Maya will probably be reinventing the wheel, and your tools will be useless.

isoparmB
12-08-2006, 03:23 AM
You'll be able to grasp Mel better if you have a solid foundation in working with Maya. Sure you could memorize syntax and commands, but if you don't get the hands on feel for what your code is doing you may very well be wasting your time. If you lack the feel for workflow your code will be less purposeful.

The thing that made mel really stick to my head was opening the script editor while I was working and studying all the commands that were generated. When you're using the UI, all you're doing in effect is interactively generating mel commands. But that's why knowing the program's other aspects is important: mel in itself exists primarily to facilitate workflow. Without knowing efficient workflow, coding in mel is hit and miss.

instruct9r
12-08-2006, 10:43 AM
Can we Get Job for just knowing MEL and nothing else
nor modelling, nor max, anything?

If you don't want to learn other things, but you're good in programming... i think if you put you'r hands on API also you'll have better chance to get the job you want...

that's a personal opinion... usually studios are looking for people that can do something with maya and to have scripting skills in that direction.. "character TD (scripting for rigging, animation); lighting TD (scripting for lights, lights FX), etc...

But yes there may be studios looking for scripters and you must be sure that you're good enough.. :)

lucille
12-08-2006, 03:29 PM
i would say instruct9r (http://forums.cgsociety.org/member.php?u=79880) comments are accurate--studios tend to cluster specialists at
various points of the pipeline rather than have shared mel coder. For some reason
modeling and setup seem to generate a lot of mel expertise. Programmers--api, python--
do tend to be shared--but there are far fewer develpment than artist jobs. The situation
at smaller studios may be much different...I don't know.

I would say--however unfair--age is a factor--but a winning personality could offset this.
The average age at studios is going up--but the demographic skews younger...25-35.

sparaig
12-10-2006, 07:09 PM
[...]
I would say--however unfair--age is a factor--but a winning personality could offset this.


I'm sooo doomed, then....

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