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TommyTheGun
11-18-2006, 08:06 AM
When Im modeling in max should I avoid triangular polygons?

andrewtl
11-18-2006, 05:52 PM
It all depends...if it is going to be low poly or a "mechanical" object it won't matter too much if you use triangles but if you are going to subdivide the object you might get some weird results. I looked into my bookmarks for pages on this and found this page which explains it a little more: http://maxrovat.sns.hu/subdiv/

Also search cgtalk for "topology" for more relavent threads.

itsallgoode9
11-18-2006, 06:05 PM
Triangles are fine as along as you aren't going to smooth your model....ummmm, yoiu might want to avoid triangles on characters that are going to be animated, around the bend and joints and stuff. I may be wrong about the animation part so you should check on that.

if you're doing low poly/videogame models, tris are a nessesity!

Baothebuff
11-19-2006, 01:54 AM
Triangles are not bad if it's in places where it's not going to deform much or that making it a quad will be complicated topology wise. It's important to keep things quad but a triangle here and there won't hurt, if you know what you're doing. I've seen models with all quads but their topology is terrible. I'd rather see a good model with a few tri's.

newellteapot
11-19-2006, 09:21 AM
Hi!

Personally., I always avoid them, I think it's good practice.

BeccoUK
11-19-2006, 10:55 AM
My 'liquid' models are always triangulated. I used to spend ages de-triangulating RealFlow3 generated mesh and found there was no difference. Recently been making some 'liquid' people for the Poser community and they too are triangulated and the joints move fine with no unwante distortion.

Doesn't it depend how big the triangles are as to how much unwanted distortion occurs?

rybeck
11-20-2006, 11:56 PM
It is good habit to NOT have triangle in your mesh.
Yes, it is all depends the situation... and sometime it seems that there is no way to get around. But try locate them in place that get less notice from viewers, such as armpit, inside nostril, behind of ears etc...
This (http://www.amazon.com/Maya-Techniques-Hyper-Real-Creature-Creation/dp/1897177046/sr=8-1/qid=1164070302/ref=sr_1_1/002-3816737-8208017?ie=UTF8&s=books) is the first encounter to introduce why it is important keeping quads in your mesh, and it was quite valuable lesson, at least to me...

itsallgoode9
11-21-2006, 03:00 AM
It is good habit to NOT have triangle in your mesh.
Yes, it is all depends the situation... and sometime it seems that there is no way to get around. But try locate them in place that get less notice from viewers, such as armpit, inside nostril, behind of ears etc...
This (http://www.amazon.com/Maya-Techniques-Hyper-Real-Creature-Creation/dp/1897177046/sr=8-1/qid=1164070302/ref=sr_1_1/002-3816737-8208017?ie=UTF8&s=books) is the first encounter to introduce why it is important keeping quads in your mesh, and it was quite valuable lesson, at least to me...

can you elaborate on the reasoning as to why it is said to be so important?
It frustrates me to hear people make such a strong sweeping statement that triangles are a bad habit because this get stuck in people's heads who are learning CG and for the next 4 years they think they can work in nothing but quads.
This is somthing that is said time and time again by people, and taught by teachers over and over that is entirely not true. Granted, there are some situations that work much better with, or require quads, but there are just as many situations where things work better with or require triangles.

sorry about picking your post to rant on, but the notion that tris are bad is a really bad thing to get stuck in a beginner's head

rybeck
11-21-2006, 05:45 AM
Quads theory will be valuable if mesh will be animated.
Non-quads meshes have potential pinching since their uneven tension on their surface unlike quads always have even tension. Animation requires pretty good amount of deformation of the mesh and non-quads possible pinching is not-so-good case...
Again, it is all depending on circumstance... I saw many talented low poly modellers make animatable meshes with lots of triangles on it. I didn't say all starter in CG world should stuck with quads theory only, but it would be better to familiar with it if you are seriously looking for modelling position, at least. As matter of fact, i wish I've thought this in the begining of my CG learning, since it tokk me awhile to get used to... That's what I think.

itsallgoode9
11-21-2006, 06:11 AM
you made me feel better now, thanks for clearing that up:) it's funny you say you weren't really taught about using quads when first learning, but I was the opposite; I wasn't taught about using triangles when first starting out in 3d, ha

TheGrandMaster1
11-21-2006, 03:35 PM
What I can tell you, being at perhaps an intermediate level, is that I've always had problems using tri's when I smooth my model. Everytime there in a oddity, a messup, or an ugly discoloration, it is always at, you guess it, the triangle.

ErikSvensson
11-25-2006, 07:07 PM
Well. I have no problems at all using triangles or n-gons. Really, if you work with highpoly and you got some triangles, most of the appilications makes quads out of it when subdividing. At least 3Ds max, maya and hexagon, which are the softwares I'm used to.

It's certainly best to work with quads all the way, but it's definitly not a must. For example instead of making a loop going around a mesh just because you needed extra detail in one area, you could just make a triangle after that area, and it will work fine. Trial and error, I'd say. :)

Erik

jimmyidol9
11-29-2006, 07:49 AM
try to avoid tris or ngons if ur using zbrush - that's for sure :)

newellteapot
11-29-2006, 05:47 PM
good point!



try to avoid tris or ngons if ur using zbrush - that's for sure :)

Diependaal
11-30-2006, 08:24 AM
i would always try to stay with quads, and if you have detailed areas, just make that area denser, you can do that without using tris or ngons, just use some creativity, to puzzle it together..

max maya and all others will make quads of it all when smoothed, but it wont help you with animation, basicly never have tri's or ngons in deformation areas.. if you do, do it at your own risk offcource, caus the converting to quads that happens with smoothing wont help you.

The smoothed mesh aint the mesh you skin weight, so the deformation happens in your tri areas if you have them, and they translate to quads in the smoothed version, but it will get the quads behavior.

Also, zbrush you can have some tri's but mudbox is a %%# about it, you cant even work with amesh with non quads in it, it will destroy your tesselation, its a bad thing of mudbox in my oprinion, but o well..



Basicly try to avoid them, you will learn more about modelling and form, when not using tri's, caus youll think more about your structure, and thats a really good thing, and no pincy surprises in the end.

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