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View Full Version : First walk cycle, C&C welcome!


Jelmer
11-12-2006, 08:47 PM
So here's my first walk cycle, really basic, but you have to start somewhere!
I'm quite experienced already with modeling, texturing and lighting using 3ds max but i wanted to tried something different so i did this walk cycle..

I've modeled and rigged it myself, but i do have a question about rigging, i use a control object linked to IK to move the legs, but how can i move the whole rig, to really move the character forward. When i try to link the foot controllers to one of my main control objects the animation is screwed up.. btw, i'm using 3ds max for this.

View the animation here (http://enjoycg.com/downloads/first_walk_cycle.avi)

Jelmer
11-13-2006, 03:43 PM
I decided to try a free rig for 3ds max to make a walk cycle with a full character, here's the result: walk cycle 2 (http://enjoycg.com/downloads/walk_cycle_test_2.avi)

I know the arms are pretty static and unrealistic, i'm working on that now, more WIP will follow, critique and comments would be usefull!

dougie0047
11-13-2006, 10:20 PM
Hi Jelmer,

I think that all the advices that I've gotten on my first walk cycle thread in this forum will apply to you too.

In addition to that, your character's (second) right leg slides when it hits the ground. Make sure that when the foot is on the ground it stays in the same position even if it rolls from heel to toe. Also, I think that there is far too much snapping going on. Again, I can refer to the feedback I've gotten. The movements should be in arcs. And his body should move up and down as well as forwards. Basically, at the point where the feet are the furthest apart (contact point), the upper body should normally be at it's lowest position logically, and vice versa, in mid stride when one leg passes the other the body will be at the highest point. The first walk cycle appears far too slow (but you saw that one I guess), and the other one may be just a bit too fast.

Keep up the good work!

Dougie

Jelmer
11-14-2006, 03:22 PM
thanks for the comments, i'll certainly use them in the future, unfortunately my timing got all screwed up.. I was making some adjustments and now the whole animation looks weird, i think it's better to start over again, because that will be the third time i do it, it won't take that long anymore.
What framerate would you use and how long would one cycle be, i usually have 30 fps, but i'm not sure how long the cycle should be, the last one was a little too fast..

dougie0047
11-14-2006, 07:39 PM
thanks for the comments, i'll certainly use them in the future, unfortunately my timing got all screwed up.. I was making some adjustments and now the whole animation looks weird, i think it's better to start over again, because that will be the third time i do it, it won't take that long anymore.
What framerate would you use and how long would one cycle be, i usually have 30 fps, but i'm not sure how long the cycle should be, the last one was a little too fast..


Hi again,

in terms of framerates, I would think about what you are rendering for. If you have NTSC in your country, I would choose 30 fps, if you have PAL, 25 fps. How long the cycle should be will have to depend on how fast you want the walk to be. My solution: I got my stopwatch out, and simply checked how much time passed by in a normal walkcycle when I was walking around. So, for example, lets say that a cycle takes 1,5 sek. and your settings are 30 fps, then a cycle (starting with one contact point - both feet on the ground- and going on until you've reached the same point again, so three steps - right, left, right) should take 45 frames, right? I then set up my characters first contact point at frame zero, keyframed everything, kept the same position and keyframed everything again at frame 45 (if you want the character to actually move through a space, then move the whole char. without changing the pose). When that was done, I went back to the mid point and set up the oppsite contact pose, keyframed that, and only then did I begin to concentrate on all the things that makes the cycle more "alive". Make sure that you take a note of the exact positions where the feet touches the ground to avoid them sliding around.

Dougie

Jelmer
11-14-2006, 09:09 PM
thanks for the ideas, and practical solution! I'm working on another walk cycle and i'll post it tomorrow, i'm really enjoying this sort of stuff, although it takes quite a bit of time since i have little experience, it's worth it!

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