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Fryday
10-26-2006, 07:31 PM
I have been working on trying to make my animation 3D for awhile. I have found that the classic stereo red, blue glasses work but you loss the color information.
I would like to go with polarized since its the best and soon to be the only way of doing this. The process is the hard part. How does it work and how do you make it 3D. I have the glasses from the new Nightmare Before Christmas REAL-D movie.
If anyone knows how to make it work, or has a site for me to look at please let me know.

flipnap
10-26-2006, 09:08 PM
you cant, unless you want your work to be displayed in a 3d theater, thats the only way to view it with polarized technology.. there are two projectors and a special polarized screen.. the only other way to view your stuff in non anaglyph (red blue) is to use shutter glasses and alternate your images to sync up.. polarized 3d is really only actual theaters..

cornel
10-26-2006, 09:08 PM
hi there.
Maybe we can help.

Creating Stereo-3D solutions with polarized glasses is what our company does each day.
Mobile (!) hardware & stereo content creation.
No need in theaters.

www.more3d.com (http://www.more3d.com)

contact me for further informations, just ask what you wanna know in detail.
cswoboda at more3d dot com

Maybe I can help.

Greetings from germany...
-cornel-

wildone106
10-26-2006, 09:44 PM
I hate the passive polarised glasses system, its got terrible ghosting & eye strain after a short time. I went to see Superman Returns and the 3d sequences they showed where junk. Polar Express was'nt bad but by the end of it my eyes where worn out. I much prefer the active glasses system, and I hope its the one theatres employ because frankly the consumer wont go for the other system..check out this info I found..


http://www.in-three.com/

http://www.in-three.com/faq.htm (More good info located here)



Question: Why does In-Three’s process not produce any eye fatigue?

Answer: Because the eye fatigue causing disparities between the left and right image simply do not exist in any of our 3D product. With our content everything is geometrically mapped in software, and there is great care taken with each and every scene as to never produce any eye strain.

Question: What is the difference between a “passive” 3D projection system and an “active” 3D projection system?

Answer: With a “passive” 3D system a polarized image is projected onto (what must be) a silver screen. This can be done with either two projectors (one for the left image, and one for the right), or with one single projector using an active electro-polarizer in front of the projection lens alternately polarizing the light with each projected left/right image. The “passive” method utilizes 3D eyewear with polarized lenses, and requires a silver screen in order to reflect and maintain the polarized light to the viewer. Left/Right crosstalk ghosting can occur with head tilt with some “passive” polarized projection systems.

With an “active” 3D projection system (which In-Three advocates) a single projector is used and projection light does not require polarization. Therefore, a theatre’s standard matte white screen can be used and not have to be replaced with a silver screen. With an “active” system the viewers wear electronically shuttered glasses that electrically turn on and off (passing or blocking light) in sync with the images that are projected onto the screen. The extinction ratios are far better with an “active” system (>100:1) than with “passive” (10 to 20:1) which translates into a far more distinct and clear 3D image without ghosting. Left/Right crosstalk ghosting does not occur with head tilt with an “active” projection method.

flipnap
10-26-2006, 10:01 PM
agreed, active is the best way to go for the good stuff... and with digital projection, shutter speeds can go much higher giving really comfortable viewing.. if you wanna see the shutter system in a cheap way (just to experiment) you can buy active 3d dvds which split the shutters into fields (which looks kinda funky) but its still active.. fun and gimmicky.. heres one.. ive seen them sold in a few places around here, they come with shutter glasses and an adaption box...

http://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Collection-Adventure-Encounter-Dimension/dp/B00005QW5S/sr=1-2/qid=1161900220/ref=sr_1_2/002-0748746-2332004?ie=UTF8&s=dvd

Elnadi
10-27-2006, 08:22 AM
I'd like to point out the Pro's and Con's of active vs. passive stereo a little more in detail. We do stereo projection and shutters for years now, so we kinda know :)

Active Projection with shutter glasses
+++ No special screen required
+++ Only ONE projector required, thus no adjusting etc. (most theatres have infrastructure for one projector only anyway)
- Requires projector with high refresh to avoid flicker (i.e. expensive)
- Requires projector to be able to provide exct sync for shutters (i.e. expensive/rare)
- Huge loss of brightness (i.e. needs an even more expensive projector)
- Has to sync vie IR to user's glasses (if anything blocks the infrared, you're out)

Active Projection with INFITEC
+++ No special screen required
+++ Only ONE projector required, thus no adjusting etc.
- Requires projector with high refresh to avoid flicker (i.e. expensive)
- Requires projector to be able to provide exct sync for shutters (i.e. expensive/rare)
- Huge loss of brightness (i.e. needs an even more expensive projector)
- Has to sync via IR to user's glasses (if anything blocks the infrared, you're out)
- Ugly glasses (until someone build better ones:)

Passive Projection using an active polarizer
+++ Only ONE projector required, thus no adjusting etc.
+ No need for glasses synchronization
+ Nice and light (and inexpensive) eyewear available
--- Requires silver (non depolarizing) screen
- Requires projector to be able to provide exct sync for Z-screen (i.e. expensive/rare)
- less channel separition than INFITEC or good shutters (i.e. light ghosting in high cotrast areas may occur)

Passive Projection as we know it all :)
+++ Most inexpensive solution, can be done at home, too....
... well you talked about the rest...

We mostly do passive stereo installations due to cost issues and of course the superior ease of use with our systems :)

Stereo viewing is just like taste a very individual thing. Many people cannot see stereo at all (read estimates of 1-3% of population) - however lacking a comparison they never notice. So we have found that there is no such thing as the IDEAL solution. It greatly depends on the viewer's individual perception. E.g. we had people tearing active glasses off after 10 minutes because of the intense flicker while others never noticed flicker at all...

Anyhow, 3D is a great thing if viewed on a large screen - go see a movie in 3D or come and see our demos here - speaking of which: we are looking for cool animations (preferably in Cinema4D) that we can render in stereo to add some awesome demo content. So drop us a line if you're interested....

Phew ... hope you enjoyed reading a bit.

// Ingo

Papa Lazarou
10-27-2006, 12:05 PM
I saw an active projection film a few years back, and I don't know if the technology has improved, but those glasses with the electronic shutter mechanism were really heavy and not comfortable at all.

I've also seen some Imax 3d films with the polarized glasses, and the 3d was flawless and very impressive, I had no problems.

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