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Jon-Huhn
10-21-2006, 04:30 PM
I guess this shows how out of touch I really am with the industry, but I have no idea what employers mean when they say "Send CV and portfolio to...." What does CV stand for?

Thanks!

JoelOtron
10-21-2006, 04:31 PM
Its a UK/Europe thing: Curriculum Vitae I think (latin?).

In other words, what we call a resumè in the states.

grafikdon
10-21-2006, 04:35 PM
I guess this shows how out of touch I really am with the industry, but I have no idea what employers mean when they say "Send CV and portfolio to...." What does CV stand for?

Thanks!

Curriculum Vitae. It is a term widely used in UK and Africa in place of 'Resume' with details on your qualifications and job experiences... it's more like a Resume.

Arrrgh4life
10-21-2006, 04:39 PM
Its a UK/Europe thing: Curriculum Vitae I think (latin?).

In other words, what we call a resumè in the states.

Yea, Latin. Curriculum would mean course, and Vitae is the genetive form of Vita which means life, so its a course of life:).

su
10-21-2006, 04:46 PM
breiefly:a summary of academic and professional history and achievements



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%A9sum%C3%A9


"In America English usage, a CV is a longer document than a résumé, and will include a comprehensive listing of professional history including every term of employment, academic credential, publication, contribution or significant achievement. In certain professions, it may even include samples of the person's work and may run to many pages. In contrast, a résumé is a summary typically limited to one or two pages highlighting only those experiences and credentials that the author considers most relevant to the desired position. CVs are the preferred recruiting tool for academic and medical professions while résumés are generally preferred for business employment."

(quote from wikipedia)


edit: formatted text for easier reading.

leigh
10-21-2006, 04:47 PM
Wow, and all these years I thought curriculum vitae was a globally used term.

grafikdon
10-21-2006, 04:55 PM
Wow, and all these years I thought curriculum vitae was a globally used term.

lol...that was my thought until 2001.

L.Rawlins
10-21-2006, 05:27 PM
I was sprucing mine up only yesterday.

Kargokultti
10-21-2006, 06:24 PM
"In America English usage, a CV is a longer document than a résumé, and will include a comprehensive listing of professional history including every term of employment, academic credential, publication, contribution or significant achievement.
Around here, a CV you send out is usually two or three pages tops; you have a master CV, and then you pick and choose the bits that are relevant to the job you're applying for, as very rarely folks will bother going past the first few pages.

Depends on the post one's applying for; I suppose some places would want to see the entire contents of the CV, while others won't bother with all the paperwork.

TumikSmacker
10-21-2006, 06:45 PM
and all these years I thought 'resume' was a globally used term :P

Improv
10-21-2006, 07:18 PM
Its a UK/Europe thing: Curriculum Vitae I think (latin?).

In other words, what we call a resumè in the states.

Universities frequently use CV, even in North America.

Jon-Huhn
10-21-2006, 07:52 PM
Wow. I didn't realize this was such a hot topic. Thanks for everyone's input!

Improv
10-21-2006, 09:14 PM
Wow. I didn't realize this was such a hot topic. Thanks for everyone's input!

Actually, it's a lame topic! We're just bored on a slow Saturday and have nothing better to do!

:-)

DrFx
10-22-2006, 12:08 PM
Wow, and all these years I thought curriculum vitae was a globally used term.
It is! I've only heard Americans use the term "resumé"!

L.Rawlins
10-22-2006, 12:50 PM
It is! I've only heard Americans use the term "resumé"!

Which is strange, because it sounds French; and American English has been changing the 'cheque', 'flavour', favour', 'colour' etc... of the French aided, amalgam language of real English for decades.

Still, to each their own.

JoelOtron
10-22-2006, 12:55 PM
It is! I've only heard Americans use the term "resumé"!

Interesting. Wonder why we here in the states decided to go with resumé?
I actually never knew what CV was till a few years ago when the term came up in a 3d World mag-- which I then googled.

My boss asked me a few weeks ago what a cv was when we got an email from someone in the UK looking for a job.

@ Improv: "Universities frequently use CV, even in North America."

Well mine didnt--but then again I went to the U of Arts.

Man--we'll go on about anything in this forum...:)

DrFx
10-22-2006, 03:15 PM
Which is strange, because it sounds French; and American English has been changing the 'cheque', 'flavour', favour', 'colour' etc... of the French aided, amalgam language of real English for decades.

Still, to each their own.
I don't know what the French use for CV. Literally, "resumé" means "summary". Here in Portugal, we often abbreviate CV to "Curriculum" only, without the "Vitae".

DrFx
10-22-2006, 03:18 PM
Man--we'll go on about anything in this forum...:)

Still, with so many job-related threads, I think it's pretty much on topic! One of the most annoying things you do as an employer is to find CVs with grammar or spelling errors in them, so it's always good to sort these things out - including knowing what CV stands for!

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