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Jagdpanther
10-10-2006, 10:49 PM
Hey just wondering if anyone can give me some good modelling habits that I should try to get.

At the moment, I haven't gone to a lot of effort to eliminate unnecessary geometry and merging everything together.

I am using projections for textures so haven't had any trouble with gettings textures onto the myriad of cylinders, cubes and other geometry I usually end up with.

Is it better to just create fine detailing on models by splitting polys and poking faces or create the shape needed however possible then merge everything, sew seams together etc?

newellteapot
10-11-2006, 09:04 AM
Hey just wondering if anyone can give me some good modelling habits that I should try to get.

At the moment, I haven't gone to a lot of effort to eliminate unnecessary geometry and merging everything together.

I am using projections for textures so haven't had any trouble with gettings textures onto the myriad of cylinders, cubes and other geometry I usually end up with.

Is it better to just create fine detailing on models by splitting polys and poking faces or create the shape needed however possible then merge everything, sew seams together etc?

Hi!
In my opinion it's certainly better to create fine details by splitting polys and poking faces, as you say, although I'm not totally sure I understood what you mean :)
I advice you to follow a couple of tutorials, there's plenty of good ones in Cgtalk. What software are you using?
cheers
Monica

benclark
10-11-2006, 09:08 AM
I know this answer sucks, but it totaly depends on what the model is for.

If it is for a still image then I would say get the shape anyway you can, whatever works best for you

For an animatable model you have to take rigging into account, you dont want any geometry to split apart when the model moves, and you also want the geometry to flow well for good animation

For games models, you need to consider your triangle limit, avoid open meshes and know how specific game engines you are modeling for handle things like intersecting geometry

You will see some models where the details are stuck on as floating geometry and some where they are modeled into the mesh. I think generaly speaking you should try and integrate them into the mesh as much as possible rather than using floating geometry

Jagdpanther
10-12-2006, 01:33 AM
thanks for the info guys.


What I meant monica-taddei was if my current practice of having loads of geometry that is positioned right but not actually attached is ok.

I guess since I haven't gone into any animation yet I haven't had a problem but I want to know if I should change my habits.

Do the problems that arise with animation matter as much in the base of mechanical objects that do not deform whilst moving or is it more of a organic model problem?

gringer
10-12-2006, 03:26 AM
Personally, I'd say getting a solid grasp of how to do surgery on a mesh is invaluable. By this I mean, attaching things together, deleting & creating edges, faces, vertices, cutting etc.

I don't know of any specific tutorials on this subject. I learned by just fiddling around, and trial and error. I would create a simple scene with some simple geometry and try joining them together somehow or doing some other kind of operation on them.

Good Luck! :D

Jagdpanther
10-12-2006, 09:11 AM
I understand how sewing and all that works just too lazy a lot of the time and haven't really encountered many situations where I really need it... yet...

newellteapot
10-12-2006, 03:34 PM
thanks for the info guys.


What I meant monica-taddei was if my current practice of having loads of geometry that is positioned right but not actually attached is ok.

I guess since I haven't gone into any animation yet I haven't had a problem but I want to know if I should change my habits.

Do the problems that arise with animation matter as much in the base of mechanical objects that do not deform whilst moving or is it more of a organic model problem?

I agree with Gringer. It's good to attach stuff, that is to give the model continuity. I would change the abit for sure!
In some cases the object doesn't require to be a whole mesh, of course, you can split it in parts. In any case, whether you want to animate or not, it's better to stick to the reality I suppose, to a certain extent. Let's say you are modeling a gun, consider how the single parts are assembled together but also that you want see some of them moving and some of them would in reality move but won't be visible. So you could for example model the inner part as a whole and the external parts that need to look independent and maybe move as separate models.
Also consider that even machines have a certain "organic" quality, and that a good cooperation between the parts would make your work look better.
Hope this helps :)

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