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CBAnimator
09-19-2006, 05:58 PM
Hi!

Ive just uploaded a new animation to my website:

http://www.cbanimator.com/Movies/GoAway_%20ChrisBennett.mov

please take a look and let me know what you think, Id really appreciate your feedback.

If you could look around my website and see the other things Ive been working on, thatd be great too!

www.CBAnimator.com (http://www.CBAnimator.com)

thanks!
Chris.

maninflash
09-20-2006, 02:18 PM
i think you should go back to bouncing balls and the principles of animation. spend six months, move one step forward to walks and runs, spend another six months, then you should be ready to start full character animation

SergeAstahov
09-20-2006, 03:42 PM
Well, i personally think you don't need go back to bouncing balls, when i read previous comment i expected something horrible, yet that was nice to watch your little animation. Although i would make the animation of legs more various rather than just making separate steps all the time if you know what i mean. Good job, keep it up.

CBAnimator
09-20-2006, 04:51 PM
mix up the legs a little more, eh? I'll go back and have a look at that, thanks!

bouncing balls?!... ouch!

shy-guy
09-20-2006, 08:03 PM
Originally posted by: Eye of Hawk
Well, i personally think you don't need go back to bouncing balls, when i read previous comment i expected something horrible, yet that was nice to watch your little animation
I agree, i was expecting something awfull because of that comment; i think maninflash went a little extreme with it. So you need to work on your animation skills, give more fluidity to the motions...but its not bad at all imo.

AndrewChang
09-20-2006, 10:39 PM
Hi! You have some nice strong poses for some parts of your animation and some that are not so readable as to the current emotion of the character. I think I liked the "go away", "I'll tell you something", and "happy place" poses the best because I feel like they could convey what the dog was feeling at the time (mostly frustration and anger I assume). Some of the other poses could use a little work but were fun to watch, just try to think of your silhouette a lot. You also may want to think about your breakdowns and how you transition from pose to pose, since it seems like the dog is sticking to his poses one after another. Think about the emotional and physical processes behind how and why he changes his movements. Sorry if this seems harsh, I really do think you're on the right track and you have a fun style!

CBAnimator
09-20-2006, 11:48 PM
no not at all. I appreciate your take on it.

I think I know what you mean - instead of just getting into the poses and going from one to the next, have him work within the poses too (by adding some more subtle animation to them). Is that right?

anyway, thanks again!

Winner
09-21-2006, 12:11 AM
manfish was having a bad day..

i think this shows a lot of promise ! I love the way youve done the mouths.. and the lipsync is actually very well animated... i agree that really you just need to add movement inside of your main poses ( some good secondary action would be good for this... having him doing something at the same time that hes talking - put them in a basic environment - some kind of setting - and it will give him something he can be doing... you can only go so far having a character in the middle of nowhere ) ... adding a bit more overlap to your actions will help break it up more too.

edit:

i dont think you should have the other character zoom off screen.. it looks weird, but also puts the rest of the acting the primary character does out of context... keep the secondary character on screen, keep his actions minimal when the primary character is shouting - but just keep him on screen so its clear where the conflict is directed

AndrewChang
09-21-2006, 02:13 AM
I agree with what Winner said, a secondary character staying on screen will definitely help with the direction of the acting. Just make sure to make the second character not so noticeable, and just react to the first one mostly.

Chris, yes I think you got what I was trying to say :) Just think about what the dog is feeling when he is transitioning, and instead of snapping from one pose to another, have your main poses be the strong "hit" poses and have him get there by subtle gestures (or even strong ones if there's a place for it, you just don't want to overshadow your main poses). For example, maybe before he says the big "SHEESH!" he could have more arc and follow through on his arms, head and back, and have them anticipate the drop into the "SHEESH" pose and then settle in...just an idea.

Good luck, I'd like to see your progress!

Kickflipkid687
09-21-2006, 03:56 AM
lmao... i thought it was pretty funny. You definately could work on some stuff, but overall I dont think it was nearly as bad as that guy was saying. I enjoyed watching it, so I guess its a job well done.

Matt

CBAnimator
09-21-2006, 12:49 PM
Thanks everyone! Thanks for the kind words, and for the critiques... youve been a big, big help!

GoGoMango
09-22-2006, 06:41 AM
I think you had some great poses and a great start at character animation. You should defenetly keep it up. Just a side note, the mouths on the side like that sorta distracted me,but its probly just me.

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