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scrimshaw1803
09-03-2006, 05:37 AM
Can anyone offer any pointers on how best to model hair. Not hair like shave/haircut or Maya hair, but actual polygonal hair.

I'm going for a cartoon style and understand how the final result should look as I;ve seen many examples of what I want on these forums (for example, AndrewH's Office Girl which is so known on these forums). What I need are down and dirty details how to approach this from step 1, which is starting with my bald human character.

My plan is (I use XSI by the way):
1. Select the polygons around the area of the head which have hair.
2. Extract these polys, while keeping the originals, to create a new mesh.
3. Take this flat mesh and extrude it to give it depth. (I've not had much luck with this step. Any XSI users know a good way to take a flat mesh bordered by "blue" edges and make a mesh with thickness and having no "blue" edges?).
4. Work some magic with extrude, add edges, pull points, etc to get the final look.

Is this the most common approach to this task? I plan to use this exact approach to create clothes for my character so is this also the best way to create pants, shirts, etc? (Select the area to be covered, extract the polys, and then model from there?)


Thanks for any advice.

machlin2006
09-03-2006, 11:18 PM
this forum is useless. you'll never find a helpful hint here because I've been posting questions about the same topic for a century now. This forum is just useless as pigshit.

kenshinw95
09-04-2006, 03:28 AM
Actually, I think it's cause modelling hair is like the old adage. "There's more than one way to skin a cat.". :hmm: Sure, my thread's on this 'board's pretty quiet, but I HAVE gotten some helpful responses. Even though, it may not have seemed like it at 1st. :D
I've been researching/experimenting with modeling hair, too. Although, I'm no expert.. yet. I was trying to "visualize" what you were trying to do, and it didn't seem like it would work. Unless, instead of extruding all the hair mesh at once. You do it in sections. Then, it might work, since you can have more control over the sections, than a whole big "mass".
Also look at many of the tutorials, and WIPs of others, and evolve your own designs using the bits, and pieces that would relate to your work.
Kinda like how people learn to draw. They emulate others until they get an understanding of "why" they emulate the artists they do, and start developing/evolving their own style.:wip:

benclark
09-05-2006, 12:01 PM
take a deep breath man! poly hair isnt worth getting stressed about

Google the Joan of Arc character tutorial. Its for 3dmax but you'll get the idea. It shows you a step by step for poly modeling long hair

merlyn00
09-05-2006, 12:43 PM
Best thing to do is to put down layers of polygon strips around the head, usually built out of 4 to 5 quads with a alpha hair strip image. Its a little time consuming, like creating real hair extentions.
Work on one side to save time then mirror and add a few extra for that hair parting.

Then tessalte the mesh aftwards to make it look more smooth. the more strands you add the better it'll look. a specular image on top of the hair texture will also help bring the hair out

http://www.merlynlear.co.uk/ml_2005_01.htm

I'm sure theres some plug-ins for XSI that'll do a grand job, but this is the universal method.

The whole thing gets a little messy when you need to add gravity. so this is a good method if you plan to just render a frame or use in realtime.

kenshinw95
09-05-2006, 07:34 PM
Best thing to do is to put down layers of polygon strips around the head, usually built out of 4 to 5 quads with a alpha hair strip image. Its a little time consuming, like creating real hair extentions. Work on one side to save time then mirror and add a few extra for that hair parting.
That was basically my plan for replacing the "place holder" hair in my 3D model. Which has been more than a "little time consuming". :scream:

Then tessalte the mesh aftwards to make it look more smooth. the more strands you add the better it'll look. a specular image on top of the hair texture will also help bring the hair out http://www.merlynlear.co.uk/ml_2005_01.htm
After I get the "facial hair" done, that's the method I'm going to try to replace that "place holder" hair I have on my female model right now. What I mean by "facial hair" is eyebrows, and eyelashes. They're on the face, and their hair, hence facial hair. :)
Oh, and the costume in that link is a bit distracting from the hair.:D

so this is a good method if you plan to just render a frame or use in realtime. I plan to use mine in an animation, so having it in "real time" is a plus.

bblanar
10-04-2006, 06:26 PM
i think i know what you were/are. i too use xsi, and im not ready to cough up the money for hair yet.

you were gonna pull the polys from the head and from that you were gonna extrude. well they are gonna be fat, im not sure what look this will create, could be neat. first tho i would subdivide those polys, and extrude along a curve, keep adjusting and re using the curve, this will be super tedious, but in xsi you can automate the setting and actions used into one custom button. not sure how, im pretty sure its possible.

also there are some hair 'hat' solid models of some hair styles that are in the net view. go check out models and look for them. its only like 2 or 3, but u could tweak it, throw on toon shader, BYAAH!

newellteapot
10-05-2006, 11:53 AM
Your way of extrudingthe polys on the head is a good starting point.

There's no definite way, just a lot of poly subdivision and extruding, and a lot of "eye" :)

newellteapot
10-05-2006, 11:54 AM
Your way of extrudingthe polys on the head is a good starting point.

There's no definite way, just a lot of poly subdivision and extruding, and a lot of "eye" :)
also, i forgot, al lot of pulling and pushing vertices around.

scrimshaw1803
10-07-2006, 01:36 PM
Actually, I found two separate techniques that I'm tried and but fairly satisfied. Note that these methods create a totally separate mesh than the head. I did not want the hair to be part of the head mesh so I could easily change hair styles and to ease texturing. Both of these methods create a planar mesh, not a solid volume.

Method 1 (my original idea):
1. Select the polygons on the head where the hair will grow
2. Extract and Keep polygons.
3. From there, start pushing points and edges and adding edges and polygons.
4. Spend lots of time

Method 2
1. Create a set of curves to follow the hair flow.
2. Loft a surface over these curves.
3. Convert the surface to a mesh.
3. Add edges, polys as needed and pull points.

Here are some results I achieved with method 1. I actually prefer using the lofted curves method as it gets me to a much better starting point.

Anyway, these are older shots and I fixed the issue with the "floating" hair (see the bottom 3/4 view shot) by selecting and duplicating the boundary edges and then scaling and translating the duplicated edges to contact the head.

If anyone else knows any other good techniques, please feel free to post.

Cheers!

http://geocities.com/scrimshaw1803/Tink7.jpg

http://geocities.com/scrimshaw1803/Tink6.jpg

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