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jonnypolez
08-07-2006, 03:52 PM
Here is an example of part of a dungeon theme project I'm currently working on.

I was wondering if people could give an insight into how they arrange their geometry when modelling environments, for example, do you stick to quads or does it not matter to you whether a face is made up of 5 or more vertices. Is keeping the entire model in quads more beneficial and advantageous if it is intended to be used in a game environment for example? Or does it not matter. Any input would be helpful!

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j183/jony_polez/example01.jpg

descoiatorul
08-12-2006, 06:22 AM
I too am interested in knowing the answer to your question . I am personally modeling a rather high-poly version of the Fort Boyard to use as a game map, and in an attempt to reduce the number of polys to a minimum I used tris on some flat surfaces, considering in my really humble opinion that it could do no harm. Again, I'm a beginer and cannot be trusted fully :).

Enlightenment
08-12-2006, 11:07 PM
I was wondering if people could give an insight into how they arrange their geometry when modelling environments, for example, do you stick to quads or does it not matter to you whether a face is made up of 5 or more vertices. Is keeping the entire model in quads more beneficial and advantageous if it is intended to be used in a game environment for example?

At minimum, if you're using n-gons at all, you need to avoid concave polygons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convex_polygon) as their rendering behavior is undefined. Beyond that, ideal geometry will depend on the game engine you're designing for. For instance, some engines just flat out just won't accept anything other than triangles. Read the tech docs for your target engine to see what it will accept and what it'd like.

itsallgoode9
08-13-2006, 08:51 PM
yeah, it varies from engine to engine. For the game i'm working on right now it doesn't matter what our geometry looks like because it all get triangulated on export for the engine anyways. Granted, triangulation can add more tris than you really need, compared to if you can made sure everything was quads first. but with the poly counts on games nowadays it's not big of a difference to really matter for most.

Having said that, I think you should stick to modeling everything in quads/tris as best as you can if you're just working on your own stuff trying to get into the industry. Even though you may not have to model cleanly like that once in the industry, it definitly is somthing that potential employers would like to see. It will defintly make you look like you have a much better understanding of modleing theory and the program in general.

jonnypolez
08-14-2006, 01:11 PM
Having said that, I think you should stick to modeling everything in quads/tris as best as you can if you're just working on your own stuff trying to get into the industry. Even though you may not have to model cleanly like that once in the industry, it definitly is somthing that potential employers would like to see. It will defintly make you look like you have a much better understanding of modleing theory and the program in general.

So in order to impress in portfolio work, presentations and university assignments etc, it would be more beneficial to keep the geometry in tris and quads?

My next question is, are tri's ok? I know with organic modelling it is preferred that you stick to quads and avoid tris (yet this is more down to animation reasons).

itsallgoode9
08-15-2006, 06:07 AM
ya know, I forgot I wasn't in the gameart thread when I wrote the response, so my input was as far as games go....just wanted to point that out.

As I said, I would stick with quads/tris as much as possible, even though it's not completely nessary in order to have a good model. It think it's stalhberg whose models have tons of ngons and whatnont in them, but you can see that all his turn out fine. So I guess it's really a matter of what you feel will better help you get a job. Like I said, I feel it shows off a better understanding of basic modeling if you show you can do this.

If you are going to be meshsmoothing stuff tris and ngons can cause wierd pinches and geomtry to not act as it should, so you definitly should try to stick to quads there unless you really know what you're doing.

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