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View Full Version : MIT $100 Laptop for Developing world (UPDATE! Fist Machines Ship)


RobertoOrtiz
06-08-2006, 07:44 PM
UPDATE:
"The ambitious project to provide low-cost laptop computers to poor children around the world is about to take a small step forward.
More than 500 children in Thailand are expected to receive the machines in October and November for quality testing and debugging.

The One Laptop Per Child program, which began at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Lab and now is a separate nonprofit organization, hopes to deploy 5 million to 7 million machines in Thailand, Nigeria, Brazil and Argentina in 2007."

http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/ptech/08/17/100.dollar.laptops.ap/index.html



Legacy post below


Quote:
"At an event put on to honor the top technology innovations from Massachusetts companies, a technology designed for users far from the halls of MIT and Harvard stole all the thunder.

At the MITX (Massachusetts Innovation & Technology Exchange) What's Next Forum and Technology Awards June 7 in Boston, Nicholas Negroponte, the co-founder of the MIT Media Lab, was inducted into the MITX Innovation Hall of Fame.



But Negroponte used his time at the podium to talk about his current job as chairman of the One Laptop per Child (http://laptop.org/) association and its goal of putting what is commonly referred to as the $100 laptop into the hands of children in developing countries.

Negroponte didn't just talk about the association and its goals; he also brought the first working model of the $100 laptop.
This working model sported many differences from the early prototypes that were seen previously. The biggest change is that the laptop no long features a directly attached crank for powering the laptop in areas without electricity—the crank has now been moved to the power supply"

>>LINK<< (http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,1973992,00.asp)

-R

csmallfield
06-09-2006, 12:54 AM
I love this project, it's such a great idea. The hand crank on the power supply is a great idea too. I want a friction power supply for my bike to charge up a laptop, that would be cool.

-Chris

Dennik
06-09-2006, 01:16 AM
Ehm, are these people aware that at some countries people have $100 to live for a whole year?

trthing
06-09-2006, 01:46 AM
Man, this might represent a great start!

It is a marvellous project: I am sure it will make a difference to many around here.

EpShot
06-09-2006, 02:51 AM
Ehm, are these people aware that at some countries people have $100 to live for a whole year?

these aren't for starving 3rd world countries. we're getting them water.

Saurus
06-09-2006, 05:05 AM
I think the cost is now projected between $130 to $140.

Link (http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/mit/)

DrFx
06-09-2006, 10:31 AM
I think the cost is now projected between $130 to $140.

Link (http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/mit/)
Expected to drop to $50 (http://www.eweek.com/slideshow_viewer/0,1205,l=&s=26006&a=180353&po=1,00.asp) by 2010.
This is very interesting, I like the design a lot, though I kind of miss the hand crank!

Dennik
06-09-2006, 01:25 PM
I think if we just gave away our previous computers instead of tossing them to the trashcan that would be an excellent service to the developing countries. Sure they won't be able to play the latest computer games, and run the latest version of windows, but its perfect for learning purposes, and its free.

Dennik
06-09-2006, 01:29 PM
these aren't for starving 3rd world countries. we're getting them water.

It if has a hand crank for places without electricity, i think yeah its for those countries. Its for people who live in houses made of reed and mud bricks.

mynewcat
06-09-2006, 01:48 PM
I think the fact that they are so cheap makes them easier for us in richer nations to buy and donate... which is hopefully what we will begin to do.

I am also excited about this project - the possibilities of spreading useful information to isolated poorly educated areas such as some parts of Africa is perhaps better than more obvious donations we could make.

Teach a man to fish and he can feed himself, but give a man the means to teach himself all the things that could benefit him - and wow, you're talking about sharing our most important asset.

unchikun
06-09-2006, 03:25 PM
Ehm, are these people aware that at some countries people have $100 to live for a whole year?

I agree. I think this computer somewhat overhyped, you still need access to the internet to really take advantage of the computer. Africa has the highest cost/megabyte in the world as some South Africans can attest. Most data goes through communication satellites owned by european telecoms. Even though there is an undersea cable in the works theres still the non-existance broadband infrastructure to contend with.

Although a $100 computer is potentially a great educational tool I think $100 worth of livestock could serve a poor farmer much better, or even training in modern intensive farming methods.

owenlewis
06-09-2006, 04:01 PM
People have done things like this before (try to advance an under developed country). I remember when the united states gave farm equipment to starving countries in Africa to help them produce more food, The people were so accustomed to there farming techniques that instead of using the tractors and plows to work the land they used them as taxis to get people from town to town ineffectively.
It wasn’t that the people were just handed the equipment left to them selves, they were shown how to use it correctly they choose not to use them because they didn’t believe how much food the equipment would help them produce.
I think something similar will happen with the laptops, they will become door stops, seats, cutting boards in the kitchen, almost anything except tools for education.

RobertoOrtiz
06-09-2006, 04:39 PM
I think something similar will happen with the laptops, they will become door stops, seats, cutting boards in the kitchen, almost anything except tools for education.
As the saying goes,: "The road to hell is paved with good intentions"

I used to have a friend who worked for the Peace Core in deep Africa.
I remember how proud she was of the work she was doing. How her organization, having learned for past errors (like that farming fiasco), concentrate now on teaching farmers techniques for better farming.

Bless her heart of her and people like her, that made a HUGE difference in their lives.

What a lot of people fair to grasp is that for a lot of these people POTABLE drinking water or
simply EATING is more important that who will win the next OS war.

To project our cultural needs into countries with DEEP poverty is short sided, foolish and it tends to be catastrophic. Talk to the people in those countries and see what their true Needs are. Talk to the organization who have been there for years.

I am sure that a computer is VERY low on the list.

Dennik
06-09-2006, 06:19 PM
taken from Wikipedia: (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poverty)

"The World Bank (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Bank_Group) defines extreme poverty (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extreme_poverty) as living on less than US$ (PPP (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purchasing_power_parity)) 1 per day, and moderate poverty as less than $2 a day. It has been estimated that in 2001, 1.1 billion people had consumption levels below $1 a day and 2.7 billion lived on less than $2 a day."

And we are thinking about sending them $100 laptops?

Why not tax the hell out of everyone who dares to enter the Forbes list (http://www.forbes.com/lists/2006/10/Rank_1.html) and send that money to those countries instead.

Titus
06-09-2006, 06:46 PM
taken from Wikipedia: (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poverty)

"The World Bank (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Bank_Group) defines extreme poverty (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extreme_poverty) as living on less than US$ (PPP (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purchasing_power_parity)) 1 per day, and moderate poverty as less than $2 a day. It has been estimated that in 2001, 1.1 billion people had consumption levels below $1 a day and 2.7 billion lived on less than $2 a day."

And we are thinking about sending them $100 laptops?

Why not tax the hell out of everyone who dares to enter the Forbes list (http://www.forbes.com/lists/2006/10/Rank_1.html) and send that money to those countries instead.

You don't seem to understand the target of this program. These computers are not for the people in hunger, are for people living in better conditions like that but still with some economic limitations, according to the FAQ (http://www.laptop.org/faq.en_US.html) in the One Laptop per Child (http://laptop.org/) website says countries considered for this program are China, India, Brazil, Argentina, Egypt, Nigeria, and Thailand.

How these computers will be distributed?, again, lets read the FAQ:

"The laptops will be sold to governments and issued to children by schools on a basis of one laptop per child."

ulb
06-09-2006, 08:58 PM
As the saying goes,: "The road to hell is paved with good intentions"

I used to have a friend who worked for the Peace Core in deep Africa.
I remember how proud she was of the work she was doing. How her organization, having learned for past errors (like that farming fiasco), concentrate now on teaching farmers techniques for better farming.

Bless her heart of her and people like her, that made a HUGE difference in their lives.

What a lot of people fair to grasp is that for a lot of these people POTABLE drinking water or
simply EATING is more important that who will win the next OS war.

To project our cultural needs into countries with DEEP poverty is short sided, foolish and it tends to be catastrophic. Talk to the people in those countries and see what their true Needs are. Talk to the organization who have been there for years.

I am sure that a computer is VERY low on the list.
I completely agree with this.

btw, i don't know what i would do with a 500mhz computer with a 1gb flash memory hd, especially without internet. openoffice and some tetris-like games excepted, those computers are useless.:shrug:

Samo
06-09-2006, 09:18 PM
I hope they have Blender installed.

Per-Anders
06-09-2006, 09:25 PM
I hope they have Blender installed.

I thought the aim was to get them to use technology, not deter them.

leigh
06-09-2006, 09:27 PM
I still think this is one of the stupidest ideas I have ever heard of. Poor people in places like Africa need FOOD, MEDICAL SUPPLIES AND WATER, not laptops that none of them will even know how to use, quite apart from the fact that most of Africa doesn't even have any kind of telecommunications infrastructure, let alone reliable electrical infrastructure.

To be frank, whoever thought of this idea is an idiot. It really pisses me off how people just don't bother to THINK about what struggling nations REALLY NEED, and instead they make out as if they're doing the world this huge favour when all they're really doing is wasting time and energy. If they really want to make a difference, they can spend the money they'd spend on building the units to actually funding some relief efforts for the regions instead.

I come from Africa. I know what I am talking about. The people at these technological institutes cannot even begin to fathom the kind of desolation and suffering that is rife throughout the continent. 100 dollars? Most of them won't hold that amount of money in their hands at any point in their entire lives.

It's astounding how people can be so ignorant.

EpShot
06-09-2006, 09:30 PM
I completely agree with this.

btw, i don't know what i would do with a 500mhz computer with a 1gb flash memory hd, especially without internet. openoffice and some tetris-like games excepted, those computers are useless.:shrug:

short memory,
i did all kinds of stuff on my 486, 66mhz comp with 500mb hd.
including ray traced 3d! Had learnind material, an encyclopedia, typed up reports. and this is before we had the interent(there was interent but my parents didn't wan tto spring fro it fro a while)

again, as was pointed out, this isnt' for nations that are still struggling with food and water.

Samo
06-09-2006, 09:32 PM
I thought the aim was to get them to use technology, not deter them.

Touché :)

eks
06-09-2006, 09:57 PM
I still think this is one of the stupidest ideas I have ever heard of. Poor people in places like Africa need FOOD, MEDICAL SUPPLIES AND WATER, not laptops that none of them will even know how to use, quite apart from the fact that most of Africa doesn't even have any kind of telecommunications infrastructure, let alone reliable electrical infrastructure.
I disagree with you. :)

This kind of assistancialistic (sorry the spelling) help doesn't do much good down the road. You just keep this people dependent on the help of others. You need to give them OPPORTUNITIES to grow and to thrive, to get food, medical supplies and water on their own, and not to eternally depend on the help and kindness of other people.

I do come from a struggling nation also, and my point of view is that helping beggars or the "world famous" children on street signs of Rio is just going to perpetuate their situation. You need to give them HOPE, opportunities, a place to study, a place to work. Giving them "spare change" are just going to keep them at the same place, waiting for the next one to give them another "spare change". The same goes to one nation giving food to the other. (IMHO.)

But back on the topic of the $100 laptop, I don't disagree with you. But I don't agree also. I think it MAY be a way to create this kind of opportunities. But it may be not. I think that they need more basic stuff first, like teachers and tables on classrooms. But then again, childreen will certainly learn how to use them pretty quick, with or without someone teaching them.

I think what's fabulous about this project is that they are just throwing a door at places that doesn't have many. It's a bet mostly on childreen curiosity. Nobody knows what will happen next.


eks

AdamHerbert
06-09-2006, 10:16 PM
I still think this is one of the stupidest ideas I have ever heard of. Poor people in places like Africa need FOOD, MEDICAL SUPPLIES AND WATER, not laptops that none of them will even know how to use, quite apart from the fact that most of Africa doesn't even have any kind of telecommunications infrastructure, let alone reliable electrical infrastructure.

To be frank, whoever thought of this idea is an idiot. It really pisses me off how people just don't bother to THINK about what struggling nations REALLY NEED, and instead they make out as if they're doing the world this huge favour when all they're really doing is wasting time and energy. If they really want to make a difference, they can spend the money they'd spend on building the units to actually funding some relief efforts for the regions instead.

I come from Africa. I know what I am talking about. The people at these technological institutes cannot even begin to fathom the kind of desolation and suffering that is rife throughout the continent. 100 dollars? Most of them won't hold that amount of money in their hands at any point in their entire lives.

It's astounding how people can be so ignorant.

Did you even read the article?

I'll reference Titus since he said it already.

You don't seem to understand the target of this program. These computers are not for the people in hunger, are for people living in better conditions like that but still with some economic limitations, according to the FAQ (http://www.laptop.org/faq.en_US.html) in the One Laptop per Child (http://laptop.org/) website says countries considered for this program are China, India, Brazil, Argentina, Egypt, Nigeria, and Thailand.

How these computers will be distributed?, again, lets read the FAQ:

"The laptops will be sold to governments and issued to children by schools on a basis of one laptop per child."

csmallfield
06-09-2006, 10:31 PM
Yeah I'm with Titus, he pointed out the things that keep being ignored by posters. heck even the impoverished in developed countries can use this sort of program. If they had this going in the inner city schools it would be an amazing oppurtunity for kids to learn a lot. When I started using a computer I was 12, had no experience, sat down on my 33mhz Performa, with 8mb of RAM, and a 250mb hard drive, started up mouse basics with some effort and now I'm a VFX artist professionally. I was even doing 3D back then, Ray Dream Studio, it took 2 hours to render a 320x240 frame with 4 cyclinders and 4 cubes with textures, shadows and reflection. I would have killed for one of these $100 laptops.

For all the people saying we need to give them water and aid. Yeah that's true, but with corrupt government officials stealing everything they can get their hands on, the aid that is sent never arrives. I'm no expert on the situation, but the real problem that needs to be solved is getting rid of curruption and trying those people responsible for crimes against humanity.

EpShot
06-09-2006, 11:27 PM
Ray Dream Studio, it took 2 hours to render a 320x240 frame with 4 cyclinders and 4 cubes with textures, shadows and reflection. I would have killed for one of these $100 laptops.


OMG!, i thouht i was the only oen to ever use that program!
man it sucked for modeling...

unchikun
06-09-2006, 11:30 PM
...the real problem that needs to be solved is getting rid of curruption and trying those people responsible for crimes against humanity.

I think these computers will be a hot item for the black market. We all heard stories of relief aid being siphoned off by corrupt "officials" up and down the line.... and this is food, medical aid etc.

csmallfield
06-10-2006, 12:16 AM
I think these computers will be a hot item for the black market. We all heard stories of relief aid being siphoned off by corrupt "officials" up and down the line.... and this is food, medical aid etc.

that's true. It sucks, but people can't just give up either. Ugh, it's depressing when you hear about all these efforts that are hurt or stopped by selfish greedy people taking advantage of their position and the people they "serve".

Ninjas
06-10-2006, 01:23 AM
I think this is great for BRAZIL, the country that has actually placed an order.

As for Africa, the original design had a hand crank and used a mesh network, so you didn't need a communication or electrical infrastructure for it to work. Of course, I already get plenty of email from Nigerians telling me to send them my banking information so that they can transfer me 20 MILLION DOLLARS!!! Ha ha, right. I really hope Nigeria doesn't place an order. I get enough spam already.

The main problem with Africa seems to me to be ignorance. Information is the tool you use to fight ignorance. A computer with the design they were talking about would give these people access to information. I would like to think that they would use it to grow food better and make potable water systems for themselves.

Anyway, it seems like a better solution then to do the humanitarian aid thing that we have been doing already for nearly 20 years and know makes no long term difference.

amfantasy
06-10-2006, 01:24 AM
You don't seem to understand the target of this program. These computers are not for the people in hunger, are for people living in better conditions like that but still with some economic limitations, according to the FAQ (http://www.laptop.org/faq.en_US.html) in the One Laptop per Child (http://laptop.org/) website says countries considered for this program are China, India, Brazil, Argentina, Egypt, Nigeria, and Thailand.

How these computers will be distributed?, again, lets read the FAQ:

"The laptops will be sold to governments and issued to children by schools on a basis of one laptop per child."


you guys need to read Titus post again. THE LAPTOPS WILL NOT BE GOING TO THE DIRT POOR AREA'S OF AFRICA!!!
So please do not mention Africa again.

Ninjas
06-10-2006, 01:55 AM
Maybe YOU should read Tidus' post homeboy. Unless you think Nigeria is someplace other than Africa, in which case maybe you should get an education.

Albius
06-10-2006, 02:25 AM
The people who are designing these aren't infrastructure experts, or agriculturalists, or aid workers- they're computer scientists, and they're trying to make a contribution. I think we should be cheering these people- if more infrastructure experts or agriculturalists took their attitude, the third world would be a whole lot better off.

The road to hell is paved with apathy- no one was ever damned for trying to do something good with what they know.

RobertoOrtiz
06-10-2006, 02:41 AM
Having grown up in the Caribbean, and living and working in DC, I have seen before projects like this before. (Hell about 5 year ago, in my homeland, there was a huge fiasco about pcs for public school students. That went south quickly.)
The problem is that projects like this one tend go off the same cliff over and over. It does not matter how good the intentions are, they end up on the same place, at the bottom of the cliff. Maybe someone should question why.

As a computer scientist I honestly question the scope of the project. Is it for countries IN DEVELOPMENT? Or the truly THIRD WORLD countries?
Again what is the core audience for this?

We computer scientists can contribute in tons of ways (helping with better distribution methods, helping non profits/ Peace Core/ Unicef), but to be honest the best way is to communicate with the people who are in the trenches right now.

As mentioned before, the last thing we need is to see these laptops being used as cutting boards.

-R

amfantasy
06-10-2006, 03:08 PM
Maybe YOU should read Tidus' post homeboy. Unless you think Nigeria is someplace other than Africa, in which case maybe you should get an education.

I'm sorry about that my post was suppose to say the dirt poor area's of Africa. I changed it. Second why are you attacking this person we keep sending them money and food and its not doing anything don't you think its time for a change. Bring them up to the times by sending them computers, they may get sold on the blackmarket but he tried, which is alot more then you can say

innermindseye
06-10-2006, 03:32 PM
It's astounding how people can be so ignorant.

errrrrr, look whos talking. at least someone is doing something to help the world rather than fatten their own pockets, like me and you.

This is not for poeple who have no food water at all. This is for people who cannot afford a computer at current prices. Are you telling me that there is no demographic that would benefit from a 100$ laptop?? Youre either rich enough to buy a $1000 one or not at all????

That makes no sense. There is always a middle ground. There are poor families in most countries of the world that cannot afford computers and your saying that this is a waste of time.

I hate it when people try to poopoo ideas that are so obviously trying to make a difference. If people didnt get involved in ideas like this, the world would be a much worse place than it is.

I commend this, and think that the generator crank idea is positively charming. Pat on the back to them for this and looking forward to the 50$ version!:thumbsup:

innermindseye
06-10-2006, 03:38 PM
I come from Africa. I know what I am talking about.

Just because you come from africa does not mean you know the needs of every poor family in the world. Your post is beyond offensive and borders on arrogant and aggressive.

Your saying you get pissed off at the idea of a company trying to make as cheap and portable a laptop as possible which is downright spoilt. Id rather a company is doing this then making cigarettes, alcohol or lame CG humans just to turn themselves a profit.

This laptop may not be the perfect solution to world poverty and hunger, but i dont thinkit was supposed to be either.

skello
06-10-2006, 04:07 PM
I still think this is one of the stupidest ideas I have ever heard of.

I strongly disagree with your comments Leigh,
I also lived in Ghana WA for years, and i can tell you i never ever touched a decent computer.
It would have been very cool if i had the opportunity to buy a laptop for this price when i was there.
Granted thats still a lot of money to come up with, but its still more reasonable than what they were selling for when i was there.
Moreover i doubt mit is doing this for the very poor folk.....who for the most part are usually in the villages where there isn't electricity to run them, nor anyone educated enought to even care to buy a laptop.
IMO any venture towards helping ppl in poorer parts of the world is a sound one.

RobertoOrtiz
06-10-2006, 05:18 PM
People, not that needs my help, is the administrator of this community.

BEFORE YOU TYPE ANYTHING ELSE, keep that in mind.

-R

imashination
06-10-2006, 06:15 PM
To be frank, whoever thought of this idea is an idiot.

These laptops wont benefit the africans at all, but thats mostly down to the fact that they're not being sent there.

amfantasy
06-10-2006, 06:16 PM
RobertoOrtiz I don't understand what you are trying to say in the post above. :shrug:

skello
06-10-2006, 06:22 PM
RobertoOrtiz I don't understand what you are trying to say in the post above. :shrug:

yup! don't either....
laptops going to africa or not .....its still not an idiotic idea.
Admin!! ?? yeah so rectify the post .... calling them idiots was totally uncalled for.

mushroomgod
06-10-2006, 06:58 PM
how can a $100 laptop EVER be a bad thing?


i think its a great idea, I fail to see anything nagative about it.

Hawke
06-10-2006, 07:14 PM
yup! don't either....
laptops going to africa or not .....its still not an idiotic idea.
Admin!! ?? yeah so rectify the post .... calling them idiots was totally uncalled for.

If the idea is idiotic then by inference whoever thought of it is an idiot....

...anyway...the idea is for governments to buy these laptops for $100 and distribute to kids and there are an awful lot of kids which means this will inevitably add up to a v large amount of money which could be spent on other things. Could some of the children possibly find a laptop of some use? Probably, but it does seem there are many many more valuable things developing (or low developed) countries could be spending the money on than gadgets that only a few might find of any use at all.

PhantomDesign
06-10-2006, 07:59 PM
[/url]
Why not tax the hell out of everyone who dares to enter the [url="http://www.forbes.com/lists/2006/10/Rank_1.html"]Forbes list (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poverty) and send that money to those countries instead.
I take offense to suggestions like this. Sure there are some monopolistic people who reach such heights through exploitation, however many of these people are highly beneficial to the world by providing economic advancement in numerous ways or technological advancement.


If we overtax the rich too much (which I think we already do) then they’ll run into roadblocks when they want to start their own company, hire people, etc – because such a huge portion of their income is being taxed. They may just decide that all their innovation is just not worth it and work some basic effortless job instead.


Basically you’re talking socialism & as many good intentions are behind socialism, there’s the simple fact that it DOES NOT WORK.


These days you go much further through honest business practices – look at newegg.com – a prime example of how honest business practices pay off. There were soooooo many computer part stores 5 years ago & you really had to watch your back because 85% of them would rip you off in a heart-beat while the other 15% had horrible customer service. Newegg had good prices like most online stores, but they did more than enough to ensure their customers were happy & in return I personally have made many newegg.com customers.


It’s the 21st century, are we supposed to punish these people for their innovation?

innermindseye
06-10-2006, 09:10 PM
People, not that needs my help, is the administrator of this community.

BEFORE YOU TYPE ANYTHING ELSE, keep that in mind.

-R

Is this an 'Im in charge so what I say goes' kinda thing?? regardless of whats right?

Also, i know what you meant there, but why did u leave all references of the said person out of your sentence? quite strange.

ParamountCell
06-10-2006, 10:16 PM
Im an african, a Ghanian, can I speak? Im going to try and be careful with what I say since topics like this can often turn offensive. To tell you the truth, I think this is a pretty good idea, if used correctly.

I have family in Ghana who are studying graphic design there, and have taught me allot about photoshop, africa is not as backwards as people think, often the media only ever shows the parts of africa that are wartorn and ravished by draught. Up untill a few years ago some people I knew thought that we have zebras and elephants walking through the street and we all have bones in our noses and carry spears.

Im sorry to say, but people are often ignorant to our way of life, and we are often misrepresented. From my own view what I have seen in africa is a willingness to learn, education is paramount, amongst many families, projects like this may be valuable to those who want to learn.

Like I said before this idea would only work if it is done correctly, with order and with balance, yes there are some parts of africa that need food and water, that also needs proper attention, however, it shouldnt just end at that point.

We africans are not so bush (primative) that we would see a laptop and not know what to do with it, and end up using it as a cutting board.

ulb
06-10-2006, 10:27 PM
how can a $100 laptop EVER be a bad thing?


I think its a great idea, I fail to see anything nagative about it.
My point is that giving computers is not a bad thing at all, but its not what they need the most. Better access to knowledge is a lot more important for developpement, and even if computers can help for this purpose, i believe this 100$ laptop operation is completely wrong in the fact that they just throw computers like if they were an aim in themselves. computers are tools that need a certain access to knowledge to be used efficiently, if this access isn't offered, they are completely useless, and the cost of that offering would be far superior to the cost of this operation wich is doomed to be useless.

I strongly think that a lot of different ways to help would be better and cost less than this operation.

sorry if my english isn't clear.

Coliba
06-10-2006, 10:31 PM
This is ofcourse not THE solution, there is no such thing but education plays a very important part and over the middle and long term education is the single most constructive and efficient way of helping countries in development. Not only does education help people to help themselves but without knowing anything about the outside world, without communicating with other people, you are ignorant and fall into the hands of whatever new propagandist who tells you how it is...

Calling this idea idiotic, is idiotic.....

computers are tools that need a certain access to knowledge to be used efficiently, if this access isn't offered, they are completely useless,

put a kid in front of a computer and a day later they'll know more about using it than an adult will learn in 1 year......

Pollo
06-10-2006, 10:36 PM
I may have to buy a few of these for my nieces and nephew when they go over to live in Cambodia. :) Hopefully everything comes out OK for these in the end. :D

csmallfield
06-11-2006, 12:00 AM
If we overtax the rich too much (which I think we already do) then they’ll run into roadblocks when they want to start their own company, hire people, etc – because such a huge portion of their income is being taxed. They may just decide that all their innovation is just not worth it and work some basic effortless job instead.



this is basically trickle-down economics ala Bush senior and it's pretty much not how things work. While I agree that honest companies with good customer service like newegg is the best way to go, I hearilty disagree that most exceedingly wealthy people got where they are by being good honest buisnessmen/women. They may have followed the law, most of the time, but the way these giant corporations are run, the expoit exploit exploit. It's the only viable way to compete in a world market where the leading corporations do the same. If you want to see a terrifying documentary check out "Wal-Mart: The High cost of Low prices". This is of course just my personal political view.

This is getting off-topic, even for something that is already so off-topic from CG. I tend to often get involved with those sort of threads.

ulb
06-11-2006, 12:02 AM
put a kid in front of a computer and a day later they'll know more about using it than an adult will learn in 1 year......
yeah i'm still a kid on that side of things, but maybe the question is: "what would be usefull to do with computers for them (and for anyone)". If it's only to create some text or do some slides in an office app, we don't need much lessons, but when its about some more complicated (and useful) stuff, more help is needed. and there are language issues too. when it comes to programming, you need to know english or another widely spoken language to learn something.
To do something really useful for yourself or others, you most often need to have some education first (would a kid be able to use 3dsmax or maya without training? i think nobody here would say that.). And i believe it would be better to spread more of that education instead of just giving computers to the very few that already got one. but i repeat it, i think it would be a good idea if both the quality of the product was better (especially screen size and flash hd) and if there were some kind of strong support and training in using those laptops to produce something useful.

amfantasy
06-11-2006, 03:18 AM
What are people saying now, that giving a computer to Africa is a waste of time? do you feel that we are stupid?

RobertoOrtiz
06-11-2006, 03:28 AM
Please oh please don't go into the politics territory.
I will close the thread if we continue in this path.


-R

innermindseye
06-11-2006, 03:42 AM
I will the thread if we continue in this path.

are you saying that your keyboard misses out whole words?! not just letters? or was it an intentional alibi hmmmmm..... the conspiracies begin....

RobertoOrtiz
06-11-2006, 03:49 AM
Point made..

:)

-R

leigh
06-11-2006, 03:55 AM
errrrrr, look whos talking. at least someone is doing something to help the world rather than fatten their own pockets, like me and you.

How can you say such a thing when you know ABSOLUTELY NOTHING about me? Maybe you're doing nothing for the world (and I am assuming that this is your admission that indeed you aren't), but I give money to a number of charities on a monthly basis, including AIDS charities back home in South Africa, as well as welfare organisations like Red Cross that are doing a lot for victims of disaster.

I absolutely stand by my earlier statements. If they want to help struggling or developing nations with education, then they can send in teachers and money to set up subsidised schools in areas that need them.

PhantomDesign
06-11-2006, 05:01 AM
You can't generalize like that; just because someone has money doesn't mean they exploited people to get there. Sure there are bad-fish out there, like the Enron scandal, Microsoft’s monopolization of various markets, and EA's employment record - but for the most part you have companies like WALMART, General Motors, and Boeing who provide countless jobs and a significant economic boost to the American economy.

Good intentions is never enough, and it's never that simple. Taking from the rich and giving to the poor only works on a short-term basis. The American economy has rebounded - it's the American way & the nature of capitalism. Whether or not trickle-down economics had any large effect we'll probably never know.

this is basically trickle-down economics ala Bush senior and it's pretty much not how things work. While I agree that honest companies with good customer service like newegg is the best way to go, I hearilty disagree that most exceedingly wealthy people got where they are by being good honest buisnessmen/women. They may have followed the law, most of the time, but the way these giant corporations are run, the expoit exploit exploit. It's the only viable way to compete in a world market where the leading corporations do the same. If you want to see a terrifying documentary check out "Wal-Mart: The High cost of Low prices". This is of course just my personal political view.

This is getting off-topic, even for something that is already so off-topic from CG. I tend to often get involved with those sort of threads.

ParamountCell
06-11-2006, 10:17 AM
I absolutely stand by my earlier statements. If they want to help struggling or developing nations with education, then they can send in teachers and money to set up subsidised schools in areas that need them.


What if some countries already have good teatchers, and good schools, but lack I.T equipment, is it then ok to send the $100 laptop?

DrFx
06-11-2006, 05:18 PM
These laptops are not for starving countries, at least the first batch.
In this map, the pilot countries are the ones in green (Brazil, India, China, etc.) The orange ones are the ones which expressed interest at ministry level (Portugal, all right!) and the yellow ones are the ones seeking funding.
http://www.laptop.org/OLPC_files/olpcmap.jpg

mynewcat
06-12-2006, 08:54 AM
I absolutely stand by my earlier statements. If they want to help struggling or developing nations with education, then they can send in teachers and money to set up subsidised schools in areas that need them.

There has been a bit of a scandal recently regarding girls being used for sexual services by some of the teachers as well.

The thing I am optimistic about with these computers is the fact that human fallibility will be bypassed.
Ideally we're talking about kids who are going to out-learn their otherwise superstitious, conservative and 'set in their ways' parents by being able to access a more global source of information.

innermindseye
06-12-2006, 10:58 AM
DrFx - - Mynewcat

i am seeing similarities here....:p

mynewcat
06-12-2006, 11:11 AM
DrFx - - Mynewcat

i am seeing similarities here....:p

He's the crazy one - I'm the good looking one :)

unchikun
06-12-2006, 03:33 PM
...the pilot countries are the ones in green (Brazil, India, China, etc.)

I think it is interesting that China is on that list. If they were to build the computer instead of the taiwanese firm, they could build for even cheaper than $100!

I'm also wondering how durable these computers are, and whos going to administer them if something goes wrong. I'm a fan of linux but I know it takes some tech savvy to troubleshoot.

I'd like a community in a developing nation to do some field testing and see if it can also double as a decent cutting board ;)

DrFx
06-12-2006, 03:49 PM
He's the crazy one - I'm the good looking one :)

Brr... fzzt*... click... I just can't let you do that Dave... brzzt... :twisted:

innermindseye
06-12-2006, 11:26 PM
Brr... fzzt*... click... I just can't let you do that Dave... brzzt... :twisted:

lol........

RobertaOritiz
06-13-2006, 01:19 AM
I have been trying to hold my tounge and not comment on this topic, but i must say.I fully agree with leigh and robert and mynewcat. how can these guys me so naive and ignorant. Most of these countries are so behind, and to force such advanced technology on them would be detrimental. I lived in mogadishu, do you know that city like many cities in africa lack a government? A girl was beaten in the street because the village elders thought she communicating with somebody unseen, was some kind of voodoo.

Like Leigh said, these people will not know how to use the thing, so it is a big waste, as roberto also stated, this will end up as some kind of kitchen utencil, in africa most of the households do the cooking outside, so i think it is worth just buying them simple kitchen utensils so that the basics can be learnt.

How on earth will this thing connect to the internet? There are no telephone lines connected to the mudhuts of deepest darkest africa. These laptop creators are just ignorant, they know nothing of how hard it is in africa, yet they come and start doing stupid things in the name of charities. Like leigh I give allot of my money to the africans, I donate to allot of charities, everybody should, these days there is no excuse since you could donate by simply clicking a button.

I have such love for the africans, there ways are so simple, since they dont have the luxuaries that we have,they should just learn to use contraception. no body should ever call me a racist or prejudice since i give to charities all the time.

ParamountCell
06-13-2006, 07:04 PM
de·rog·a·to·ry (dhttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/ibreve.gif-rhttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/obreve.gifghttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/prime.gifhttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/schwa.gif-tôrhttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/lprime.gifhttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/emacr.gif, -thttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/omacr.gifrhttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/lprime.gifhttp://img.tfd.com/hm/GIF/emacr.gif) adj.1. Disparaging; belittling: a derogatory comment.
2. Tending to detract or diminish.


I cannot believe what I am hearing in this thread, no amount of charity could ever hide the the views certain posters have about africans. In case some of you still dont know this, africa is not as uncivilised as you may think.

innermindseye
06-13-2006, 07:48 PM
I have been trying to hold my tounge and not comment on this topic, but i must say.I fully agree with leigh and robert and mynewcat. how can these guys me so naive and ignorant. Most of these countries are so behind, and to force such advanced technology on them would be detrimental. I lived in mogadishu, do you know that city like many cities in africa lack a government? A girl was beaten in the street because the village elders thought she communicating with somebody unseen, was some kind of voodoo.

Like Leigh said, these people will not know how to use the thing, so it is a big waste, as roberto also stated, this will end up as some kind of kitchen utencil, in africa most of the households do the cooking outside, so i think it is worth just buying them simple kitchen utensils so that the basics can be learnt.

How on earth will this thing connect to the internet? There are no telephone lines connected to the mudhuts of deepest darkest africa. These laptop creators are just ignorant, they know nothing of how hard it is in africa, yet they come and start doing stupid things in the name of charities. Like leigh I give allot of my money to the africans, I donate to allot of charities, everybody should, these days there is no excuse since you could donate by simply clicking a button.

I have such love for the africans, there ways are so simple, since they dont have the luxuaries that we have,they should just learn to use contraception. no body should ever call me a racist or prejudice since i give to charities all the time.

again with the naive and ignorant. who said they are going to FORCE these countries to take the laptops, as you seem to have put it. you seem to think they cant have internet without a hardwire. there are several wireless internet solutions. sounds like they are not the only naive ones.

this is a cheap laptop. you dont want, you dont buy. plenty of people will want. good for them. this is not meant to fix the whole worlds problems. how dare people criticise and put all this pressure on a company that just manufactures laptops. its ludicrous. it is not their respnsibilty to heal the world.

ParamountCell
06-13-2006, 11:36 PM
its ludicrous. it is not their respnsibilty to heal the world.

Well said, It seems these "Chiefs" cannot understand that, instead all that is being spread is the whole idea of developing countries not being technically smart enough to understand a pc.

Ninjas
06-14-2006, 12:41 AM
I love how all these folks keep pointing out that Africa has no phone lines so that THE BEST ENGINEERS ON THE PLANET must be ignorant if they think they can get internet to work. It is called a "mesh network". Say it with me folks, m-e-s-h n-e-t-w-o-r-k. It will link one computer to the next, to the next, etc, until it can access a cell tower.

I think a good rule of thumb would be to say to yourself, "are these some of the smartest people on the planet?". If the answer is yes, they are PROBABLY aware of basic common knowledge things like the fact that Africa has virtually no infrastructure. If you can't figure out how they are going to make something work, it is probably because you aren't smart enough. Not because they don't know what they are doing

AJE
06-14-2006, 12:50 AM
I don't think my opinion will matter much, but I feel the need to type anyways...


I think the laptop is a good thing, and here's why:

Education - education is the only thing that can truly save a people or society. Some would argue that tribes with generations of bush living are educated (and I would agree, since they would clearly outlast me in their world), but the fact remains that education breeds tolerance and ingenuity... I think we can all agree that everyone could handle a bit more of both.

Now, these laptops aren't going to be forced on people... they'll be an option for people, so if the bush tribes chose to explore it, so be it.

(And yes, I fully understand that these are not destined for those areas specifically -- I'm using it as an example)

If nothing else, perhaps full motion, read only content, like 'how to go about getting fresh water to your village/farmland via aqueduct' or 'what AIDS actually does to the body, and how to protect yourself'.

Even if every 6 months a new topic is covered, you would be spreading information.

I DO agree with Leigh when she says that Water/Health etc... but I think that having a 'teacher' in every place is ineffective. Having one teacher, recorded for many to view is a much better investment of funds. Also, it allows for kids to learn through interaction, immediate results to computer tests, and there's room for the entertainment side of things... imagine a cartoon character that teaches them. Then if need be, have a roving teacher that travels through the villages/towns for one day a week, updating and answering questions the people are sure to have.

Nobody should be robbed of the right to learn, be it Forbes 500 guy, or the Bushmen of Africa... and if having a laptop that can be purchased by me and donated, saves a child from a life with AIDS through education, I'd gladly skip Starbucks for a month.

Ultimately, it's a project I believe in because I can see the potential. It's not about the laptop, it's about the content it can deliver, and the lives it can change.

AJE

eks
06-14-2006, 01:22 AM
again with the naive and ignorant. who said they are going to FORCE these countries to take the laptops, as you seem to have put it. you seem to think they cant have internet without a hardwire. there are several wireless internet solutions. sounds like they are not the only naive ones.
The two main (http://www.flickr.com/photos/tags/reden%C3%A7%C3%A3o) parks (http://www.flickr.com/photos/tags/parc%C3%A3o/) in my hometown, Porto Alegre (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=porto+alegre+brazil&ie=UTF8&ll=-30.039972,-51.219978&spn=0.21488,0.43396&t=k&om=1), south of Brazil (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=porto+alegre+brazil&ie=UTF8&ll=-30.069094,-51.240234&spn=53.594544,111.09375&t=h&om=1), have free Wi-Fi access, thanks to Procempa (http://www.procempa.com.br/).

:)


eks

innermindseye
06-14-2006, 10:17 AM
great. i think my posts are being monitered before they get posted because of what ive written here. All i have been doing is debating. I doubt that itl ever be taken off. Thanks cgtalk. :thumbsup:

ParamountCell
06-15-2006, 11:51 AM
great. i think my posts are being monitered before they get posted because of what ive written here. All i have been doing is debating. I doubt that itl ever be taken off. Thanks cgtalk. :thumbsup:


That is strange you ddint seem to say anything that was offensive.

innermindseye
06-16-2006, 06:08 PM
That is strange you ddint seem to say anything that was offensive.

Yea i know. I just made correct points from my side of the argument. which is what i thought ur supposed to do here at cgTALK.

Leigh is a mod and i think i pee'd her off big time. If ur reading this Leigh, i am sooorryyyy. Can you fix my account now pleeease. i love cgtalk :sad: didnt mean to offend you. just adding fuel to the fire u know. :) let the mother burn, that kinda thing :)

anyway sorry.

RobertoOrtiz
08-23-2006, 12:43 PM
MIT $100 Laptop for Developing world (UPDATE! Fist Machines Ship)
UPDATE:

"The ambitious project to provide low-cost laptop computers to poor children around the world is about to take a small step forward.

More than 500 children in Thailand are expected to receive the machines in October and November for quality testing and debugging.

The One Laptop Per Child program, which began at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Lab and now is a separate nonprofit organization, hopes to deploy 5 million to 7 million machines in Thailand, Nigeria, Brazil and Argentina in 2007."

http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/ptech/...s.ap/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/ptech/08/17/100.dollar.laptops.ap/index.html)

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