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View Full Version : When making a complex object or scene, must it all be connected geometry, or. . .?


Pollo
06-07-2006, 01:16 PM
Hey,

If for example I'm modelling a gun. All of the littel intricate details, must they all combine, as in, the vertices of the detail must attach to somewhere on the gun model, or can you just making the two pieces intersect and then combine them, and therefore, they move along with each other?

Also, how does this car over into modelling a scene. Is most of the scene just one complete mesh, or can things just not be connected by combined/interesected? Thanks :)

tecsun
06-13-2006, 07:39 AM
Hi Pollo, for me it is not neccesary to have a complex object complete in one mesh. Sometimes it is more easy to control with seperate object assemble up together. Example, a lego model, you are first to model out each piece, then assemble them up to get your final model.

Hope I hit your point. ^_^

newman
06-13-2006, 12:44 PM
That all depends on what you need it for; that being said, you'll find most professional models consist of a single mesh, which is actually simpler the control, and you can still animate parts of it using some sort of bones, depending on the app. If you need any help regarding this in max, send me a pm and I'll try my best to help.

WayneZacMP
06-14-2006, 10:41 PM
It you wanted to model a gun, for example, you would probably find the modeling process easier adding details as separate objects because you do not have to worry about edge flow; you do not have to make sure the correctly sized polygons are in the location you want to extrude. Instead you create a new object to stand in place for the desired detail. However, texturing a single mesh is easier than trying to texture multiple objects in a seamless way.

Pollo
06-14-2006, 10:48 PM
Thanks everyone. Very helpful indeed. :)

newman
06-16-2006, 08:54 AM
I'd just like to clear one point up: a single mesh and a sigle element mesh are two different things. On a single element mesh, you have all the polys connected to neighbouring ones, meaning you only get 1 entity in the "element" sub-object level; in this case you have to worry about smoothing, edgeflow, etc. However, using the attach command you can get multiple meshes into 1 - in the element sub-object mode you will now be able to select different sub-meshes. This makes it ideal for animating mechanical parts - if you were making a gun, say something semi-automatic, like a Colt 1911, you could make the main gun body of 1 mesh, the top part of the tube (the one that moves forwards-backwards) as a separate mesh, as well as the trigger and the clip (if you want animated reloading).. Then attach everything onto a single mesh, and use skin to animate the parts; now you'll be able to use "select element" option in the skin options which will make your life a lot easier.

Pollo
06-16-2006, 10:37 PM
I'd just like to clear one point up: a single mesh and a sigle element mesh are two different things. On a single element mesh, you have all the polys connected to neighbouring ones, meaning you only get 1 entity in the "element" sub-object level; in this case you have to worry about smoothing, edgeflow, etc. However, using the attach command you can get multiple meshes into 1 - in the element sub-object mode you will now be able to select different sub-meshes. This makes it ideal for animating mechanical parts - if you were making a gun, say something semi-automatic, like a Colt 1911, you could make the main gun body of 1 mesh, the top part of the tube (the one that moves forwards-backwards) as a separate mesh, as well as the trigger and the clip (if you want animated reloading).. Then attach everything onto a single mesh, and use skin to animate the parts; now you'll be able to use "select element" option in the skin options which will make your life a lot easier.

Thanks for the heads-up :)

Nice Newman avatar :D

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