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darkdreams
05-11-2006, 06:01 PM
hi, can someone help me?

I'm doing Azrael-Batman armor and I think i'm doing it fine, but the front part is separeted and i don't know how to unify it, i tried weld, connect but it just look bad, i'm not an expert modeling, so can someone help me? here are some pics :sad:
http://www.filelodge.com/files/room20/521525/Azrael-Batman.jpg
http://www.filelodge.com/files/room20/521525/Azrael-Batman%20Wireframe.jpg

scrimski
05-11-2006, 08:03 PM
Sorry man, but this wireframe is utter crap. Have a look at and tell us what you can see on it except too much wihte lines.
Try the link in my signature or if you can't open the file try here
http://www.military-meshes.com/forums/articles.php?action=viewarticle&artid=16


Beside that this Batman has some severe issues in its geometry. Search for some reference material, have a look at a few character modelling tutorials and maybe start again.
This gap in the armor is nothing worth to mention compared to the rest.

darkdreams
05-11-2006, 10:53 PM
Well, I said I'm a rookie on this, but thanks I think I will doit again :thumbsup:

mackdadd
05-13-2006, 04:46 AM
don't worry about it, we were all there at some point, making crappy meshes! :)

you could go into the polygon sub-object level, turn on vertex snap, and build some polygons in between, bridging the gap. once the polygons are there, re-smooth it in your smoothing groups and it should blend right in.

in vertex sub-object, you could try turning on vertex snap, and right clicking on a selected vertex, choosing target weld, and dragging the vertex to the other vertex you want to weld it to. then, after you've welded everything you wanted, adjust them all to get the exact look you want.

if neither of these works, just say so, i'll see what else i can think of.

scrimski
05-13-2006, 08:42 AM
double post, please remove

scrimski
05-13-2006, 08:45 AM
My reply wasn't meant to be rude.

In my opinion it doesn't make sense to invest time and energy into something that isn't 'right'.
Character modeling is a wide field with plenty of things to look at, with principles and basics which are worth to follow, not because they exist, but because they are proven, because they work.

As said, don't worry about it, we all started somewhere with crappy meshes, animation, textures and stuff. It's not impossible to learn this after all, so just do it, keep on learning, trying, failing and succeeding.

edit: some links
http://www.secondreality.ch/tutorials/tutorials.html
http://67.15.36.49/ffa/tutorials/max/joanofarc/joanmenu.asp

The last link is a bit outdated, nonetheless the best I now for rookies I know so far, because it covers the whole process from setting up references over modelling to texturing and rigging.

darkdreams
05-17-2006, 01:23 AM
Well, thanks for the tutorials and the help, it works!!! :thumbsup:

I know I got a lot to do and is a little hard when you learned by your self, but I wanna make amazing models like all artists in here!!! :buttrock:

newman
05-19-2006, 12:29 PM
In my opinion it doesn't make sense to invest time and energy into something that isn't 'right'.

Nobody is born as a great 3d modeller. We all sucked at the beginning (some of us still do :D)
Sometimes you need to do something that's crappy so you can identify what you're doing wrong and what you need to work on. All part of a learning process. As for the mesh, I agree, start over :) But don't think for one second that the work you did so far was a waste of time. And don't give up! Learning 3D is a long, sometimes frustrating, but all things considered, a very rewarding process. And it never really ends... not if you really like it.

scrimski
05-19-2006, 01:13 PM
No, of course it isn't a waste of time.
But it's my personal experience - like all of us I started with crappy meshes - that it is easier adn much more effective to start again, to avoid the errors from the last try from the very beginning(just to make some new errors :D).
I strongly believe in that trial and error approach. Some mistakes you have to do by yourself to really understand the dimensions and influences on your work, not just the knowledge of what to do and what better not to do - dos and dontt's about, but a really deep undestanding.

And of course nobody is born as an 3d artist. I'm a quite good modeler and texturer, but
I'm poor animator, rigger and skinner, my skills are not much higher than basic understanding, because i never had to practice them, there are of no use for my field and I don't have that much spare time to try out.

darkdreams
05-19-2006, 05:51 PM
Well, I think you all are right, 'cause we never stop of learning, I'm still in a school but they don't teach you all that you want and in the way you want, so you have to see tutorials and try to learning by yourself. I'm good modelling objects and some things like space ships, cars, etc (you can c my snowspeeder here in cgtalk by the way :applause: ) but in characters i'm still learning

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