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Dakad
01-06-2003, 01:54 PM
How to create print quality photoshop files on a short system like Pentium 400Mhz ? If I make i.g. 10 layers in a 300 dpi (letter size) document there is no chance to save that document. The system can't bear it.

fig
01-06-2003, 04:05 PM
the only good immediate solution i can think of is to go buy more RAM :) processors are SO cheap now too, that really may be something to think about if you're doing a lot of print at all.

other than that you can try flattening as you go and keep your filesize down that way. also make sure you've got LOTS of free space on your hard drive as you're creating a big temp file for that ps doc. another tip is that if while you're working make a change then save, close and re-open ps you'll free up some of that temp space as well. time-consuming i know, but it may help. good luck.

chris

Ian Jones
01-07-2003, 02:22 AM
Fig: You can do that with edit > purge > history / undos

Also, quite a bit of additional image information can exist outside of your canvas that you amy not know about, or not be bale to select and delete without turning your document upside-down. there is a solution though, granted you will lose picture information... but if your main composition is complete this does not ususally present a problem. Select the entire canvas ctrl+a then edit > crop. This will delete any additional image information hiding outside the canvas area.

fig
01-07-2003, 02:58 AM
ooh, good tip ian, thanks :thumbsup:

chris

Dakad
01-09-2003, 10:53 AM
That was useful. Thanks.

bigyou
01-09-2003, 04:49 PM
all that was said up here is great but i would simply suggest that you reduce the resollution of the image. of course a 300 dpi image will print perfectly, but you can easily make it a 200 dpi image without losing a lot of quality on the printing.
so i would say reduce the resolution down to between 150 and 233 dpi and everything would still be very nice looking and it would be easier to manage for your printer and your system.

puu
01-16-2003, 10:56 AM
in case you dont know, Photoshop wants heaps of RAM, as much as you can get. And you need some large space on the HD as well, otherwise the RAM starts choking up. So if you are really into it, its time to upgrade. Give the 400mhz machine to someone who is into computers but hasnt got one yet:)

blankslatejoe
01-22-2003, 08:30 AM
Originally posted by bigyou
all that was said up here is great but i would simply suggest that you reduce the resollution of the image. of course a 300 dpi image will print perfectly, but you can easily make it a 200 dpi image without losing a lot of quality on the printing.
so i would say reduce the resolution down to between 150 and 233 dpi and everything would still be very nice looking and it would be easier to manage for your printer and your system.

good point. I read somewhere the human eye cant tell the difference between 150 dpi and 300 except for REALLY fine edges, like type. Solution, lay out all your type in illustrator.

A printer's trick: you can store the images as a PDF if you have acrobat distiller. Normally the quality is blah, but you can set the program to save type and images at DIFFERENT resolutions. Meaning, you can have a 150 dpi image, and 600 dpi type, and a 24 by 36 inch poster will only end up being 20-30 megs when sent to the RIP/printer.

Downside, this is only a solution for storage/printing. You can't really "build" the image this way. And even so, you'd want a copy of the layers for records' sake.

So yeah, time to get more RAM. I was chugging a long with a 450mhz, 128 mb RAM for a few years, and could do just about ANYThing in PS except posters size, high quality. You could also look into a second hand, 30 buck graphics card. even that much would really help out if you're cramming.

Another idea: if you're using multiple hardrives/partitions, make sure your scratch disks are set up. (in preferences)

dg
01-29-2003, 02:53 AM
Hi,

Work in RGB mode them when you are done, flat and convert to CMYK, RGB files are smaller and your control over the collors are better, use proof colors in CMYK mode to emulate an CMYK output, but make sure you have a calibrated system.


See Ya!

DannyB
01-30-2003, 11:20 PM
get the specific line screen (lpi) from your printers repro dept and then set your resolution accordingly, you can do this is with image size use the 'auto' button, tap in your lpi and set to good.

You could do your text in illustrator but quark is more efficient and creates easier to handle files. Especially when it comes to handing your finished artwork over to the bureau or printers for repro.

PDFs are great for transferring files via FTP but watch the jpg compression and be sure to embed all fonts.

Also if you have a complicated layer mask to cut around an images layer. Copy that image once sized in your rgb comp and paste into a grayscale file. It will be the same image size and placement as the rgb one. Make your layermask around the grayscale image, when finished paste the alpha channel back into the rgb comp and it will be perfectly placed for you to select it and apply to your unmasked colour layer (hope that makes sense). This is especially good with super hires stuff.

Manage your layers efficiently and delete/apply any unwanted ones.

Press 'apple' + 's' a lot cos your probably gonna crash a bit

Or as blankslatejoe said just get a better machine, they generally end up paying for themselves and mean your creativity doesnt suffer

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