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thebulfrog
05-09-2006, 11:22 PM
Hey all,

I was hoping you could take a look at my reel and tell me what I'm doing wrong, what I'm doing right, and what could be better. Any advice would be appreciated. It's about a minute and a half, and to be quite honest, I'm not sure if it would be directed towards animating, lighting, rigging or modeling. In my attempt to do everything, I know I'm not the master at any of them that I'd like to be. All the same, this is four years culmination of work, and I hope to start sending it out in the next month or two, and I'd really love to hear what you all have to say.

http://www.jeremyshuback.com/Animations/demo_reel.html

Craiger
05-10-2006, 04:28 AM
Hey thebulfrog,

The problem with your reel is that you don't know what your marketing yourself towards. Now this is going to sound harsh, but there is nothing on your reel that is professional. You need to pick something, be it animation, modeling, rendering, lighting etc. and focus on that one thing. Learn it very well. Its true that studios like to have people who can do many different things,,, but they need people who can do different things on a professional setting.


Good luck.

thebulfrog
05-10-2006, 07:06 PM
Hey thebulfrog,

The problem with your reel is that you don't know what your marketing yourself towards. Now this is going to sound harsh, but there is nothing on your reel that is professional. You need to pick something, be it animation, modeling, rendering, lighting etc. and focus on that one thing. Learn it very well. Its true that studios like to have people who can do many different things,,, but they need people who can do different things on a professional setting.


Good luck.

I had a feeling that would be a serious critique. It would sound harsher if I didn't completely agree with you. I think that's what the next few months, years....are going to be driven towards. Any suggestions what my strongest suit is?

The weird thing is in painting and drawing I'm much more prone to sketch rather than do a finish...you'd think that that would translate to only wanting to do parts of an animation- but no, I really like the idea of doing everything....and yet....I know it's not the way....

Thanks for being honest.

Sontaran
05-11-2006, 01:14 AM
thebulfrog, first of all, you can see that there is a lot of hard work that has gone into your reel. You obviously have built a lot of good foundation skills (which you already know) so keep it up.:thumbsup:

I agree that its good to be an all rounder, but you need to be strong in all those skills to pull it off. Its best to focus on one or two disciplines first, get into a job using those skills and build it from there.

I had the same dilema, to choose where to focus my energies first. One option is to choose the area that interests you the most, that is most exciting for you. It might not be the area that you are best at right now, but you go for it because its what interests you. Another option is to build the area you are strongest at now, which might overlap with the previous option I mentioned anyway.

So which of the disciplines you've done so far give you the best buzz? What would you like to do all day long as a pro?

In regards to your reel:
The robots look great. they seem to be rigged well and deform well. I was a bit concerned with the deformations on the chest and shoulder area of the big guy with the orange top. These areas are hard to set up. I would focus your reel more on the last half with the interior robot scenes. Nice story though. I personally found it hard to see a lot as it is rendered quite dark. Could it be made a bit brighter?

There's a lot going on in it. You could also try to isolate some of your favourite cahracaters and show them off with out all the other action in the scenes.

I hope this helps in some way.

freakmoomin
05-14-2006, 02:41 PM
I think you have a decent foundation of skills now, and as the others have said you probebly need to concentate on one of those skills now to move to the next level.

My only advice to you is think quality rather than quantity. For example: have one robot nicely animated and rendered rather than 10 robots averagely animated and rendered.

hope this helps

KevinKraeer
05-14-2006, 10:37 PM
Hey thebulfrog, I graduated from the cuse in '99. How is good ole Shaffer Art Building.

My major was computer graphics too. While my time at Syracuse is probably the most fun I've ever had in my entire life, and the teachers were awesome, I found that the computer graphics program there left a little to be desired overall. That's only after finding this place and seeing the work coming out of VFS, SCAD, and the like. I had no clue schools like those even existed in the mid-90s. Maybe they didn't exist. I don't know much about VFS or SCAD or Gnomon, but my guess is that they make you focus on doing one thing very very well, and don't have a liberal-arts style, "build a framework first-and-then go to grad school" education going like the Cuse does.

What I can tell you about your reel is that you have a heck of a lot more going on than I did in my graduating reel. It seems clear that you've done the work of learning how to make models and how to skin characters and all of the technical necessities of 3D animation/video editing. Next, as everyone else says, is to choose a focus. Even if you'd like to be good at everything someday, starting with just game modeling, or just animation using Character Studio, is a good move career-wise. Talk to Heath and Ed (are either of them still there?) about it, Heath was my advisor had some great advice on grad schools, that may be an option too. Turned out I couldn't afford it, so I've used the years since graduation to practice obssessively and it has served me pretty well out here.

Best of luck.

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