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cache
04-15-2006, 01:26 PM
With the lead of Tibor Balogh, Holografika ltd. developed a holographic 3d display in Budapest, Hungary, that is already available to purchase. Giants like Peugeot and Renault are seriously interested in the new technology as well. ("Peugeot - as a potential customer -has been testing the device since 2005 Fall, they believe it will greatly help the work of the engineers by introducting 3d displays during the process of product creation.")

"this 3d display has no problem displaying pictures of such softwares like 3d studio, CAD-applications, so basically all graphics that contains the necessary 3d information."


sorry, i cant find any english version of this fresh hungarian article (from which i translated the quotes) which is located here: http://index.hu/tech/tudomany/ttfkp060327/

the pictures (except the first) are links to little movies (wmv) , that were created by the authors of the articles during the interview.
worth a look.

edit: here is a direct link to a movie made by the developers:
http://www.holografika.com/HoloVizio640RC.avi
(~6 mb)


other links:
http://www.holografika.com/

here are a few -not so fresh- articles if you are interested:
http://www.weforum.org/site/homepublic.nsf/Content/Interview+with+Tech+Pioneer+Holografika
http://www.budpocketguide.com/3Dtelevision.asp

Dennik
04-15-2006, 02:17 PM
Looks amazing! If only they would make round displays like that, it would be perfect!

Can't wait to play games and see movies in displays like that, it would be awesome! :drool:

BTW any idea how this display works?

Coliba
04-15-2006, 02:23 PM
One limitation so far is you need 3 or four dvi cables to even get to 25fps. With one you get just 9fps....

ndog
04-15-2006, 07:03 PM
From what is shown in the avi it seems to work only in the horizontal axis and only over a fairly narrow field of view.

DeadlyFreeze
04-15-2006, 07:14 PM
From what is shown in the avi it seems to work only in the horizontal axis and only over a fairly narrow field of view.

Ya thats what I was thinking dosent look to be truly '3d', but impressive none the less.

cache
04-15-2006, 08:02 PM
i emailed the author of the hungarian article, who saw this technology with his own eyes, and he said that right now it only works in horizontal axis, but not because of the technology, but because it needs a lot of resource..

so the technology can handle both horiz and vert. axis, hardware of the present can't.

time will tell how accessible it will be in the future, though it looks promising :)
but man .. i really envy my - yet nonexisting - grandchildren :D

mech7
04-15-2006, 08:15 PM
It is not truly 3d holographic.. but isn't this the same as the philips screen comming out soon? I read somewhere they are gonna cost around 9000 to 10.000 euro.. and allready are talking with game developers and such.

http://www.business-sites.philips.com/3dsolutions/

In 2008 it should be available for consumer market.

yenvalmar
04-15-2006, 08:23 PM
i cant wait for this stuff to really catch on, i've been doing home made 3d with polarized lenses, glasses, and two projectors for years now, but requiring glasses definitely sucks.

DeadlyFreeze
04-15-2006, 09:03 PM
Nich market at best, I can tell you right now its not going to make it. I dont really understand the practically of it at all. Do they expect people to walk back and forth in front of their TV?

Even in professional application whats the point? You have a cube you can manipulate in a fully 3d environment how do you make it any more 3d?

depleteD
04-15-2006, 09:51 PM
Wow that is so crazy. So absolutley crazy

Dennik
04-15-2006, 10:30 PM
Nich market at best, I can tell you right now its not going to make it. I dont really understand the practically of it at all. Do they expect people to walk back and forth in front of their TV?

Even in professional application whats the point? You have a cube you can manipulate in a fully 3d environment how do you make it any more 3d?

It makes sense for holodecks. ;)

secretasianman
04-16-2006, 12:14 AM
it's a cool idea, i wasn't blown away or anything butvery cool.

if they could do it horizontally as well as vertically that would be better.

a reason to have larger disc space if they were to make movies like this for certain reasons.
then you could see the movie in different views not just from side to side but to see what it would look like if it was a birds eye view or a ground view.

i would actually watch different movies more than once to see it from different views. tht is if the movie is worth watching more than once. with the movies coming out these days it is hard to find one that you would want to watch multiple times.

NanoGator
04-16-2006, 01:58 AM
I want one of these just for modeling.

Ugh.. Despite that, I think this one's suffering from the 'blurry edges' problem that these stereo monitors usually have. *sigh*

CupOWonton
04-16-2006, 03:47 AM
The games should allow people to turn the function off.

Nimrodicus
04-16-2006, 05:49 AM
Couldn't find any material about how this technology works but I have a theory... :lightbulb

Those familiar with the lenticular 3D LCD screens probably have an idea about how those work and the inherent limitations (resolution due to the thin verticle stripes, limited field of view etc.) Thin verticle prism-like stripes act as lenses to direct different images to the left and right eye - the different images being composed or calculated in such a way as to mimic the angles at which your eyes would need to see the scene/images in stereoscopic (3D) fashion. There is a certain amount of thickness to the layer of lenticular material that rests against the screen, so that as your head moves from sided to side, the image that winds up being aimed at your left or right eye can change - for printed lenticular 3D images, there are usually multiple images, but for a 3D LCD screen you are likely to only have 2, which can cause problems, such as when the images are viewed at severe angles, or problems with the left & right eye images reversing (right eye sees image meant for left eye and vice-versa), which ruins the 3D effect.

Enter holography. Holographic material can be made to do all sorts of nifty stuff. Among them, it can act as lenses. A very thin piece of holographic material can actually be made to function like a thick glass lens if desired. Or as a series of very finely graded lenticular lenses even. A thin sheet of holographic material could be 'imprinted' if you will, with a much finer-spaced set of lenticular lenses on a much thinner substrate than your normally manufactured lenticular material. This much-thinner, finer-spaced lenticular material could then be overlaid onto a display much closer to the source images - close enough to eliminate some of the problems traditional lenticular presents. Since the holographic lenticular could also have much finer spacing, it would be possible to supply more left/right eye images on the monitor (qty would depend on the limits of the display resolution & the spacing of the holographic lenses/prisms). This would allow for a wider field of view of the displayed object/scene - such as with certain printed lenticular 3d images - than it would be with just 2 images (single left & right eye views). Perhaps this is where the multiple DVI cables & slower framerates would come in? A lot of processing power would be needed to compute say, 16-32 different angled views of the same scene/object simultaneously...

So if this IS close to the way their technology is working (and I could be completely wrong of course), it would explain why the view alters along a horizontal direction only. But the end result is that the displayed image would likely be a stereoscopic 3D image with a fair range of viewing angles (horizontally at least), just not the projected, viewable-from-any-angle holographic image that many of us would like to see perfected one day. As far as the remarks about the tech supporting verticle parallax as well, I'm not sure how that would work, but assuming the display resolution could handle it, and the holographic lenticular material could be printed in right way, then multiple views could be generated not only for horizontal parallax, but for verticle parallax as well (think of the computing power required for that...). You could think of as being similar to a Quicktime VR object where all the possible viewing angles are projected at once, with the holographic material directing the angle of the different views in such a way that view changes depending upon the angle at which you view the screen.

I'm not entirely confident of my theory tho' after watching the demo avi, as it appears that a rather large number of views of the objects are being provided simultaneously, and that would require I really really high resolution display (higher than normally available) I would think. But it's the only theory I have. :shrug:

If anyone has any links to info indicating how this tech REALLY works, pls post it as I'm very curious and steroscopic/holographic stuff is something of a side-hobby of mine...

And I'm too tired to know if I wrote all this in anything resembling readable english lol, so my apologies if it seems like so much gibberish...

Nimrodicus
_________
[insert clever/witty saying or remark here]

JMcWilliams
04-16-2006, 08:56 AM
it's a cool idea, i wasn't blown away or anything butvery cool.

if they could do it horizontally as well as vertically that would be better.

a reason to have larger disc space if they were to make movies like this for certain reasons.
then you could see the movie in different views not just from side to side but to see what it would look like if it was a birds eye view or a ground view.

i would actually watch different movies more than once to see it from different views. tht is if the movie is worth watching more than once. with the movies coming out these days it is hard to find one that you would want to watch multiple times.

But that completely ruins the whole reason a movie should aim to be well directed and choregraphed. :sad: You probably lose the pacing, the music ends up sounding off, it screws up the great editing.

If the viewer can just arbitrarily change view to a birds eye shot whenever they want then the impact of the well crafted film is gone, the movie would be a mess. :cry:

Not that this system would be capable of that anyway. :)

I suspect that this system is more about providing '3d' vision without the need for glasses. If your right eye can see a slightly different angle than your left eye then then you don't need the tinted glasses to filter the image for you. It's not really a real 3d display though.

cache
04-16-2006, 09:48 AM
further infos on the future plans of the company : they are planning (by september 2006 it will be ready thats what they say) a control setup containing 4 cameras (and of course software for it) especially for this display, which will allow the user to control certain functions with his hands.

movies: yeah i think it would ruin certain kinds of movies as well, but definately would open a few possibilities at the same time.

i definately wanna try modeling, texturing, zbrushing (!!!) with these displays, especially when one will be able to rotate, pan, zoom with hands (fingers ?) :)

kaiser_pro
04-16-2006, 09:57 AM
http://www.holografika.com/technology/index.shtml

It looks like the standard autosterographical display, with small verticle lenses (Like on those"holocards" things you got with cerial packets) to stop the jerkyness.

The need for more DVIs is that the image is High res(much bigger than 1900X1020 hence why you only have 9fps)

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