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fattyLees
03-08-2006, 03:16 PM
I designed an ad for a friend's business that will be printed in a booklet.

I finished it all in photoshop last night and it dawned on me that maybe the TEXT in the ad won't be clear and sharp enough. It looks ok on the screen, I'm just wondering how it will translate into print.

I hear that people often use illustrator for text inlieu of photoshop, so is this something I should lose sleep over?

I'm just trying to help a friend out, so any advice would be very much welcomed.

Thanks,
Fatty

Whipyo
03-08-2006, 09:44 PM
If it is big chunky text, you can get away with it at 300dpi.

If you have a lot of fine text, save your file as a photoshop PDF. As long as your text is still a text layer in photoshop (not rasterized) it will remain as vector data in the PDF. Obviously this is dependant on weather your print shop or printing device will accept PDFs or not.

Otherwise, setup your type in illustrator as you say.

emba
03-08-2006, 09:46 PM
well the first thing you have to remember is the resolution or the dpi. screens work with 72 dpi, a good print starts with 300 dpi. so things that look good on screen don't have to look good on paper as you pointed out.

generally if you have a 300 dpi image with the proper cm or inch don't go lower than 9 points. you still can read things but it gets quit pixilated. the 9 points are for standard fonts like Arial, or futura. with fancy thin fonts you have to be more careful.



Illustrator works with vectors/paths that means itís a mathematical shape defined by points and curves. No losing information by rescaling since the shape gets created with the same mathematical formal again and again. It prints the quality you want to print. Photoshop works with pixel. With resizing pixels you lose quality. text layers in photoshop are vectors, so no problem with rescaling. As soon as you print it will render the text to the dpi the file has.



I hope that helps you.

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