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View Full Version : Blu-Ray to hit stores in May, amid controversy


Beamtracer
02-28-2006, 03:35 PM
The Register:
Blu-ray Disc will go on sale in the US on 23 May, according to Sony's home video division, Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, MGM Home Entertainment and Samsung. The South Korean giant will ship its BD-P1000 hardware on that date, ready to play the eight - count 'em - films the two content companies will release on the same day.

Viewers who've worked their way through all eight movies will be able to buy eight more on 13 June. On that date, Kung Fu Hustle, Legends of the Fall, Robocop, Stealth, Species, SWAT and Terminator will join the already released 50 First Dates, The Fifth Element, Hitch, House of Flying Daggers, A Knight's Tale, The Last Waltz, Resident Evil Apocalypse and XXX.
http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/02/28/blu-ray_us_launch_date/


Both Blu-Ray and HD-DVD will come with a new DRM (copy restriction) technology known as AACS. The license agreement says they must phase out analog audio and video outputs on future disk players.

ArsTechnica:
Put simply, AACS licensees must eliminate analog outputs on consumer electronics devices by 2013 to remain in compliance with the license.

Forced obsolescence it is.

The end result will likely be a consumer rush to buy less-crippled players (you can't call them non-crippled because AACS cripples by definition) before the sunset period begins.
http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20060224-6255.html


Meanwhile, former Apple executive, Mike Evangelist, blasts Hollywood for including this new restrictive DRM:
Under pressure from Hollywood, they are engineering a complete removal of the concept of fair use. They are setting up systems that will completely control how, when and where you can use content that you buy. Even worse, they can retroactively change the rules!
---
Both HD-DVD and Blu-ray have embraced this draconian system, and the studios are salivating at the prospect of you never actually being able to own content again.
http://writersblocklive.com/part-156

Maybe hold on to your humble DVD player!

pgp_protector
02-28-2006, 05:52 PM
Looks like we'll have to keep an eye on DVD Jon :)

js33
03-01-2006, 01:57 AM
Well it looks like Hollywood and the EFF will wind up in the supreme court to settle this once and for all.

opus13
03-01-2006, 08:06 AM
man.. this is going to be dat/dcc/minidisc all over again.

i still am not going to buy a damn thing until the war is over. all i want is a HD medium that is standardized and transportable. bluray? hd-dvd? hvd? i really dont care at this point, and there are a fair few that feel the same way. just release a product that everyone will produce for. the public largely doesnt give a damn what its called, as long as it works.

tufif
03-01-2006, 08:31 PM
I do technical support for a company that makes high end home theater systems. Most customers still use the composite connections, even with their hd tvs, and they ask why we don't have the coaxial plugs anymore. I can see a bunch of people buying these because it's the new high end dvd player, realizing they can't plug it in to their tv or play their old dvds, and then returning it. I'll place my bet that good old dvd sticks around until hd video is downloadable and packaged media is a thing of the past.

Steve Green
03-01-2006, 09:01 PM
I'm constantly amazed how intent they are on seeing BR/HD-DVD die on their arses.

I've had problems with HDMI losing signal between my DVD player and projector, and have to use analogue RGB to view DVDs.

Upscaled DVD will do me just fine until they get their act together.

- Steve

Neil
03-01-2006, 09:02 PM
Viewers who've worked their way through all eight movies will be able to buy eight more on 13 June. On that date, Kung Fu Hustle, Legends of the Fall, Robocop, Stealth, Species, SWAT and Terminator will join the already released 50 First Dates, The Fifth Element, Hitch, House of Flying Daggers, A Knight's Tale, The Last Waltz, Resident Evil Apocalypse and XXX.

Dude, who the hell comes up with these release titles?!
I can't wait to see romantic comedies take advantage of the blu-ray quality (50 First Dates I'm looking at you) :rolleyes:

And no quality increase is gonna make SWAT a good movie or Knights Tale. Species?! Ugh. I mean I'm not even being picky here. Release the movies that would showcase the technology. Where is Star Wars, Gladiator, Black Hawk Down, etc. Although 5th Element is a good choice.

OneSharpMarble
03-01-2006, 11:05 PM
Dude, who the hell comes up with these release titles?!
I can't wait to see romantic comedies take advantage of the blu-ray quality (50 First Dates I'm looking at you) :rolleyes:

And no quality increase is gonna make SWAT a good movie or Knights Tale. Species?! Ugh. I mean I'm not even being picky here. Release the movies that would showcase the technology. Where is Star Wars, Gladiator, Black Hawk Down, etc. Although 5th Element is a good choice.

What you're not among the masses waiting for XXX to come out on blu-ray?

Digiegg
03-02-2006, 12:00 AM
mmmm HD xxx...

SheepFactory
03-02-2006, 01:09 AM
XXX on blueray... I better save up $1500 for that player cause its gonna be so worth it!

-Vormav-
03-02-2006, 01:28 AM
Knight's Tale? RE:Apocalypse?
Some crazy executive has to be playing some kind of bad joke on the Blu-Ray developers.

DaJuice
03-02-2006, 02:48 AM
Am I correct in assuming these releases are downscaled from 2k res or whatever the movie was in originally? It would really suck if somehow the content was upscaled from something smaller than HD, dare I say it, even regular DVD?

Either way, those are some questionable choices for a first wave...:argh:

ribok7
03-02-2006, 03:56 AM
XXX on blueray... I better save up $1500 for that player cause its gonna be so worth it!


you mean high def porn....right? :)

jeremybirn
03-02-2006, 03:58 AM
Am I correct in assuming these releases are downscaled from 2k res or whatever the movie was in originally? It would really suck if somehow the content was upscaled from something smaller than HD, dare I say it, even regular DVD?

I think Blu-ray and HD DVD players will output a full 1920 x 1080 resolution through the digital HDMI connections on (future) HDTV sets, but will only output more broadly compatible analog signals at 960540, so that's all that would be sent to a current HDTV.

-jeremy

parallax
03-02-2006, 08:44 AM
I got 50 bucks on the fact that lots of releases will be up-rezzed in software, instead of being a proper 1080P release.
I go on record saying this Thursday, March the 2nd, of 2006. Mark my words.

Beamtracer
03-02-2006, 09:57 AM
I got 50 bucks on the fact that lots of releases will be up-rezzed in software, instead of being a proper 1080P release.
I go on record saying this Thursday, March the 2nd, of 2006. Mark my words.
That would be scandalous. Those expensive Blu-Ray & HD-DVD machines, including that restrictive DRM they come with, and all they give you in return is a scaled up version taken from low-res masters. :argh:

pearson
03-02-2006, 10:00 AM
I bet this generation will be just like laser discs; despite better quality, only the few with money to burn will buy into it. The masses are fine with DVD and confusion over the TVs and connectors, plus the two warring formats, will keep them from even getting involved.

I really hope the fair use thing gets resolved soon though. I LOLed IRL when an Apple exec complains about retroactively changing the DRM rights, when Apple themselves have done this with their iTunes.
:rolleyes:

PyRoT
03-02-2006, 01:22 PM
I bet this generation will be just like laser discs; despite better quality, only the few with money to burn will buy into it. The masses are fine with DVD and confusion over the TVs and connectors, plus the two warring formats, will keep them from even getting involved.

I really hope the fair use thing gets resolved soon though. I LOLed IRL when an Apple exec complains about retroactively changing the DRM rights, when Apple themselves have done this with their iTunes.
:rolleyes:

Id agree with that. The current quality is good enough for most people. Many people still don't have DVD players I think so yeah.. I dont have faith in thsi new generation stuff.

Lets not forget that thread about those 300GB (and eventually 1.6gb) holographics discs being released at the end of 2006!

Tomek

Neil
03-02-2006, 04:21 PM
When I had a stint at working at Best Buy, I couldn't tell you how many people didn't even know/care about the difference between FS and WS. Now that's very obvious and simple to most people. So now try to explain to them this whole new format. haha.

JosephGoss
03-02-2006, 04:50 PM
?

i think bill gates said somewhere that these hd discs will be the last and after it will be downloads and stuff like that

i was thinking about if we downloaded movies, would they be like itunes, where if you bought a new dvd player or tv, you simply have to deactivate it and reactivate it on the new one?

will it be like that?, cos it stop piracy but still lets you use the film on a new computer, you just have to deactivate the old one?

or will it be like napster, where your stuff for life with that computer?

just woundering

pearson
03-02-2006, 06:51 PM
i was thinking about if we downloaded movies, would they be like itunes...[snip]...or will it be like napster, where your stuff for life with that computer?
It will be even better! If you buy a film from Universal, one set of hardware will be supported, with special DRM rules, but if you buy one from Disney, the hardware and DRM rules will be different!! And the DRM rules can be changed retroactively at any time. Joy! :rolleyes:

So, directors like George Lucas will have the power to force you to "upgrade" your copy of their film to the latest "correct" one, even if you preferred the version you already have! The version you bought and paid for will simply stop working and display a message that you need to upgrade, or perhaps simply download the new version without even telling you. The first time you'd notice is when you're getting to your favorite part and find out it's been changed! :banghead:

Neil
03-02-2006, 07:51 PM
I wonder how well those retroactive contracts will hold up in court. I mean imagine a car dealer doing the same thing, then they change it 2 days later to say that they can seize your bank account.

DrFx
03-03-2006, 09:44 AM
We have a new category for movies: It's called "Straight-to-Blu-Ray" and only the crappiest, stinkiest movies directed by Uwe Boll qualify!

talos72
03-03-2006, 05:30 PM
Once again, the big industry folks are behind the curve. Untill the format wars with the HD stuff settles, which could be a few years, I doubt people will be flocking to buy the discs. By then, as mentioned, downloadable formats will be more common hence repeating what happenend with the music industry as CD sales slumped while downloadable music began to dominate the market.

Whether the film/music industry folks can curb or lobby for the removal of fair use, to me, will essentially be moot. Ultimately, you can't control digital media by its very nature: it is fluid, it does not reside in a box and just about anyone with a basic hardware setup will have access to it. The only way to truly limit or control access to digital media would be to halt all electronic and satellite network infrastructures-- highly doubtfull :rolleyes:. You don't think people in China still have full internet access, despite the most stringent government controls? There are probably millions of Chinese downloading music and movies under the nose of the government, with or without HD DVD or Blue Ray.

BillB
03-03-2006, 10:54 PM
You don't think people in China still have full internet access, despite the most stringent government controls? There are probably millions of Chinese downloading music and movies under the nose of the government, with or without HD DVD or Blue Ray. If only that was what the govt cared about :rolleyes: And when the govt owns and controls all the pipes coming into the country, then no there aren't millions of them doing what they want.

Sure is going to be interesting watching this whole HD thing unfold. Personally I *want* HD movies, so if it's gonna be a train wreck, they better clear the tracks fast and get something else running!

pgp_protector
03-04-2006, 12:10 AM
Nother prediction:

Both systems come out, but are still full of problems.
Informed people don't buy the new stuff as the old stuff looks fine to them.

THEN.....


Wait for it.....

The MPA, RIAA, QUBYGAA ect ... complain that there not getting the sales there expecting, and it must be due to piricy. and new laws are pushed through banning DVDs and CDs.

pearson
03-04-2006, 12:44 AM
Nother prediction:

.....The MPA, RIAA, QUBYGAA ect ... complain that there not getting the sales there expecting, and it must be due to piricy. and new laws are pushed through banning DVDs and CDs.
Or they just mandate that every american must purchase a DVD for full price at least once a month! That would make it "fair" to all the poor starving rich media companies. ;)

opus13
03-04-2006, 12:48 AM
i swear... it's stuff like this that causes piracy! if content was easily accessible at a decent price, i'd bet that the ne'r-do-wells would have a hard time being profitable at ripping the studios/industry/world/grandmother off.

tweeeker
03-04-2006, 09:12 AM
i swear... it's stuff like this that causes piracy! if content was easily accessible at a decent price, i'd bet that the ne'r-do-wells would have a hard time being profitable at ripping the studios/industry/world/grandmother off.

Again I'm just speculating here, but does everyone think that downloading hd content is really only a couple of years off? Blu-ray discs are going to contain 25-35 gb of content. That's some awful big downloads. If it became the norm for everyone, i.e no renting or shop sales, overall bandwidth per user is going to drop possibly below what it is now, despite increased bandwidths from service providers.

Just think, king kong is only a few weeks away. Perhaps even on hd it'd be a double disk package. I don't know what sort of disk sales they expect on the day of release, but imagine all those people trying to pull around 70 gig each. That would take some monumental hosting effort.

Not to mention, hard drives are big these days, but not that big. It won't take too many 30gb films to fill a typical hard disk. I have around 200 dvds, so as hd anywhere up to 6 terabytes of content. So, I guess I'd be burining them to some sort of disc myself... how does that work re encription??? It'd have to be considerably cheaper than a nicely packaged shop purchase for me to consider all that. And ultimaltely studios don't want to sell stuff cheaper.

I'm not so sure music is too good a comparable example. People listen to music on the go, which makes hardisk playback ideal. Storage of vast quantities of tunes also fit nicely onto current hardware specs - has done for years. HD content is possible pushing the limits on bandwidth/storage limits a little too much for is to be 'convenient' in the same way music has become.

Anyway, playing devils advocate a tad here - dunno really what I think at the moment. Buts its certainly an interesting topic.

T

Shadow_545
03-04-2006, 09:14 AM
Nother prediction:

Both systems come out, but are still full of problems.
Informed people don't buy the new stuff as the old stuff looks fine to them.

THEN.....


Wait for it.....

The MPA, RIAA, QUBYGAA ect ... complain that there not getting the sales there expecting, and it must be due to piricy. and new laws are pushed through banning DVDs and CDs.

lol sounds like there should be a sith lord somewhere in the mix too.

Beamtracer
03-04-2006, 09:31 AM
The MPA, RIAA, QUBYGAA ect ... complain that there not getting the sales there expecting, and it must be due to piricy.
The organizations you mention are the ones pushing for more restrictive DRM. The reason is that it maintains their dominance against other competitors and new entrants.

The DRM copy restrictions have nothing to do with stopping piracy. The pirates will continue to operate out of South-East asia. This is because the copy protection mechanisms have already been cracked. HDCP, for example, was cracked many years ago.

I'm very against piracy. But these restrictions won't stop it. Meanwhile, the average consumer gets hurt by having to purchase new equipment.

MarGera
03-04-2006, 07:51 PM
Dude, who the hell comes up with these release titles?!
I can't wait to see romantic comedies take advantage of the blu-ray quality (50 First Dates I'm looking at you) :rolleyes:

And no quality increase is gonna make SWAT a good movie or Knights Tale. Species?! Ugh. I mean I'm not even being picky here. Release the movies that would showcase the technology. Where is Star Wars, Gladiator, Black Hawk Down, etc. Although 5th Element is a good choice.

I totally agree, have they never seen these films!
they even did the same with the PSP and UMD'S!
I mean King Kong is out this month, they should have that ready to go at launch, make a real splash, show people what they are getting for there money!

innermindseye
03-05-2006, 12:42 PM
will sony ever bloody learn?!!

Lorecanth
03-05-2006, 09:28 PM
Again I'm just speculating here, but does everyone think that downloading hd content is really only a couple of years off? Blu-ray discs are going to contain 25-35 gb of content. That's some awful big downloads. If it became the norm for everyone, i.e no renting or shop sales, overall bandwidth per user is going to drop possibly below what it is now, despite increased bandwidths from service providers.

Just think, king kong is only a few weeks away. Perhaps even on hd it'd be a double disk package. I don't know what sort of disk sales they expect on the day of release, but imagine all those people trying to pull around 70 gig each. That would take some monumental hosting effort.

Not to mention, hard drives are big these days, but not that big. It won't take too many 30gb films to fill a typical hard disk. I have around 200 dvds, so as hd anywhere up to 6 terabytes of content. So, I guess I'd be burining them to some sort of disc myself... how does that work re encription??? It'd have to be considerably cheaper than a nicely packaged shop purchase for me to consider all that. And ultimaltely studios don't want to sell stuff cheaper.

I'm not so sure music is too good a comparable example. People listen to music on the go, which makes hardisk playback ideal. Storage of vast quantities of tunes also fit nicely onto current hardware specs - has done for years. HD content is possible pushing the limits on bandwidth/storage limits a little too much for is to be 'convenient' in the same way music has become.

Anyway, playing devils advocate a tad here - dunno really what I think at the moment. Buts its certainly an interesting topic.

T

Ehh they can get the size down to 7 or 8 GB if they want it just requires very careful H264 encoding. That 35 GB limit is for the mpeg-2 released version.

tweeeker
03-05-2006, 10:26 PM
Ehh they can get the size down to 7 or 8 GB if they want it just requires very careful H264 encoding. That 35 GB limit is for the mpeg-2 released version.

At what quality though? The 1080p H264 quicktime trailers I've downloaded would hit 8gb for a 2hr movie and tbh, I thought the compression artifacts were pretty severe. Fine for a trailer, but I'd expect better if I was shelling out for it. Modern lcd tv's don't hide those nasty artifacts like old tvs did back when DVD was released.

T

amfantasy
03-05-2006, 11:01 PM
XXX on blueray... I better save up $1500 for that player cause its gonna be so worth it!

are you joking. there is no standard hd, and it is full of drm

why :shrug:

nothing pisses me off more then waiting 5 hours for a movie to download then finding out that you can't play it...lol

BillB
03-06-2006, 01:15 AM
I was just at the DVD store, and I clicked to something. I know why they've set the pricing and initial titles they have! For the past few months, I've been putting off buying big releases on DVD, figuring I'd hold out for HD. Having seen the pricing and release titles, I'm suddenly thinking "you know, I'm not sure that's something I want to wait for". I may just go back to buying DVD's again, and I'm wondering if that's what their idea is at this stage - they *want* us to go back to buying DVD's and not wait for HD to sort itself out :rolleyes:

amfantasy
03-06-2006, 01:51 AM
is the movie really 30gb or is it a 4 gb file with 26gb dummy file?

Brumfield
03-06-2006, 08:39 PM
If HD movies were only 4GB, then there would be no need for these new formats, and they could just start selling HD versions of today's DVD's. The space is needed, and yeah, you could probably get an HD movie down to <10GB, but I have no doubt the compression artifacts would be very noticable, as tweeeker pointed out in regards to the HD trailers (there are a good number of current gen DVD's that push the boundaries of the format and have noticable compression artifacts... not to mention, why do you think we have those 4 disc sets?), and if that's the case, what's the point? The less compressed it is, the better the quality (and when we're talking HD, the quality is the whole point), the higher the file size.

Beamtracer
03-06-2006, 09:48 PM
We will see legally downloadable movies (in H.264 format) become very common, very soon.

However, they'll start off with small screen sizes, making the downloads feasible. As the years go by, the screen sizes will slowly be increased as bandwidth becomes cheaper.

Eventually downloadable movies will reach the size we currently know as "HD", and then surpass it.

RobertoOrtiz
03-06-2006, 10:10 PM
Eventually downloadable movies will reach the size we currently know as "HD", and then surpass it.

Agreed, and that is why I dont see a long shelf life for this format.

-R

pearson
03-06-2006, 11:25 PM
We will see legally downloadable movies (in H.264 format) become very common, very soon.

However, they'll start off with small screen sizes, making the downloads feasible. As the years go by, the screen sizes will slowly be increased as bandwidth becomes cheaper.

Eventually downloadable movies will reach the size we currently know as "HD", and then surpass it.That sounds likely, but I think they will try to charge too much for too little. Add in the requirement that you buy new hardware, and the deal will be broken for the majority of users, IMO.

I'm not really that into it, but I'm pretty sure that all those people who bought "HD ready" TVs are still going to be required to buy more hardware for blue-ray (besides the player). Also, maybe it's just because I'm used to a crisp monitor, but I haven't seen a TV where the picture really impressed me, and they still cost way more than I'm willing to spend.
:shrug:

noisewar
03-07-2006, 01:03 AM
The real bottleneck right now is not the codec, the DRM, the blu-ray, but the TV. Your choices now fall along the lines of:

Heavy - CRT
Expensive - Plasmas
Ugly - LCD
Solo watching - Projection
DIY - Projectors

Most consumers are not ready to upgrade to 1080p hdrmi wtf and hootenanny anytime soon, much less replace their collections of DVDs when there are things still only availabe on VHS, and half of the folks out there can't tell the difference. Too little, too soon, for way too much. This is truly the laserdisc of our generation.

P_T
03-07-2006, 01:45 AM
This is truly the laserdisc of our generation.

What do you mean by that? Most of my friends, relatives and me included had Laserdisc player in our homes. I remember watching Terminator 2 in LaserDisc format and never rented VHS. I thought it was a standard medium beside the VHS. :curious:

noisewar
03-07-2006, 03:21 AM
What do you mean by that? Most of my friends, relatives and me included had Laserdisc player in our homes. I remember watching Terminator 2 in LaserDisc format and never rented VHS. I thought it was a standard medium beside the VHS. :curious:

As someone who's parents spent extraordinate amounts on laserdiscs only to abandon it for SVCD and then DVDs, I observed that convenience and content accessibility was ultimately the deciding factor for them, and they were pretty average in a community of middle-class entertainment nuts. Karaoke, bad movies, and aerobic vids never pushed the envelope for them to want anything better than a dim RCA projection TV, which they proudly impressed the neighbors with the size of.

Beamtracer
03-07-2006, 04:11 AM
There were so many previous threads on CGTalk about Blu-Ray Vs HD-DVD... which one was better than the other.

Current developments have somewhat taken the excitement out of both formats for me.

The MPAA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MPAA) and the RIAA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riaa) have lobbied hard to have more restrictive DRM (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Rights_Management) on these new formats.

To view High Definition content, you'll not only need to buy one of these new players, but every piece of equipment in your home audio/visual system needs replacing. People aren't going to buy it! It's so restrictive, nobody will want it.

Add to that, the limited content that'll be available.

Here's my prediction: Blu-Ray and HD-DVD will both fail to become common formats for purchasing content. They're both going to be expensive flops. The public won't accept the restrictions of the new formats, and will keep using their existing DVD players instead.

js33
03-07-2006, 10:54 PM
The only problem I see with the DRM is having to buy new equipment to play it on. Other than that what's the big deal?

I think blue-ray will succeed due to being in the PS3 if it ever comes out. When the PS2 came out with the ability to play DVDs it was actually cheaper to buy the PS2 than it was to buy just a DVD player and the same thing will happen with the PS3 as initially the Blu-ray standlone players will be expensive. But look how fast DVD players came down in price same thing will happen with BR and HD-DVD.

pearson
03-07-2006, 11:05 PM
But you didn't have to buy a new TV to watch DVDs on. Especially since many people bought "HD ready" TVs in the last few years, thinking they would be set for the future.

This brings up an interesting point, though. Will you be able to watch blue-ray movies on your PS3 on your current TV? If the MPAA gets the ban on analog cables it's seeking, then PS3 could be in a tough spot. It could output game content to your TV, but to play a movie, you'd have to buy a new TV with the correct digital connections. That would really hurt adoption, imo. Dropping $400-500 for the PS3 thinking you're getting a cheap player, and then realise you have to drop another $2k for a compatible TV...:eek:

Edit: wow, it took me 4 years to make 1000 posts! Slow typest...:p

js33
03-07-2006, 11:48 PM
Well for people like me that have waited to buy an HDTV and still waiting for the 1080p sets to mature it won't be a big deal. But yeah if you already bought an HDTV and it wouldn't work with Blueray or HDDVD players then yeah I would be pissed. But alot of people that would buy a HD DVD player probably would be buying the HDTV at that time as well.

PyRoT
03-08-2006, 12:42 AM
Does anyone remember that thread about the holographic discs that should apparently be out by the end of this year? I don't know about you but it seems that these blu-ray and HD discs will have a hard time competing with the initial 300gb storage. If the format is capable of easy reading AND writing then I don't see how these restrictive next-gen discs will stand a chance.

I mean, ideally, you want the same discs to be available for PC and that should influence things. I for one know that PC users will prefer 300GB (and eventually 1.6TB apparently) to the storage capacity of these new gen discs.

BTW, I read in an article that Sony really needs Blu-ray to win, moreso than MS with HD-DVD and if this doesn't happen they will probably suffer huge loses in the long run.

Tomek

js33
03-08-2006, 08:29 AM
Well tonight at Fry's I saw a Toshiba HD-DVD player on a Toshiba 73" 1080p HDTV and it was sweet. The salesman said "Uh, oh what's that doing out here. It's not supposed to be on display until next month." Hehehehe. I guess I got a sneak peak. Also the Toshiba player looked very nice and well built not cheap like most current DVD players.

The demo disc had clips from about 6 different movies on it including King Kong. I have never seen a better picture on a TV before. The colors were rich, much better than what you would see in a movie theater and the resolution was very good. Even though Blue-ray will have higher capacity the picture won't necessarily be any better for just watching Hi Def DVDs. Sure for recordable discs I would rather have the higher capacity but just for watching from a player it won't matter much.

Once these HiDef players come out you will see a surge of player as well as 1080p HDTV purchases.

The future looks sweet from where I'm standing.

zukezuko
03-08-2006, 12:45 PM
Sony has locked this thing up so tight ...
we wont be able to play even legaly bought disks :)

who knows what these guys are up to, remember the sony CD protection (http://news.com.com/Sony+CD+protection+sparks+security+concerns/2100-7355_3-5926657.html) ?
the app/virus on theyr music CDs that instaled itself on the pc.
Man i dont trust them.

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