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fritz8th
02-19-2006, 07:36 PM
Hello everybody just had a question about rigging. For my demo reel im going with a main focus on Hair Fur and Cloth but I want to do my secondary skil as rigging im not wanting to be a rigger for a min job title but just have it for if the company needs background charactes rigged or anything just not main character wise. Just wanted to know what I should set my focus to on rigging do I need to have Facial rigs or muscal deformation on my reel or realy just stick with the basic rigging aspect. Any help would be great. Thanks for the time.

Dan

virtualmesh
02-20-2006, 02:32 PM
Hi Fritz, excellent question.

Others in this forum are actual professionals at rigging, (I'm a hobbiest) they will have a greater intimate knowledge of what the industry requires and expects from students.

My suggestion to you is that you consider achieving a well-rounded skillset at rigging a basic skeleton (it's joints) as well as the muscular system that drives those joints. An excellent book I just picked up is titled Action Anatomy by Takashi IIjima (surname spelling?). It really helped me understand quite a bit about rigging a human character and it does not even mention any 3D application.

Side note: Your intent to concentrate on fur, hair and cloth simulation within your portfolio may not really convey your skills to a studio because most hair/cloth simulations for the most part are already done for the general user - one sets up the simulations with plugins and presto, the keys are created. Of course if you have unique examples of hair/cloth simulations within your art work then by all means, use as much tools/simulation that will increase the clarity of the message you are saying with your work but don't get lost in the technical mumble-jumble. That's usually a fall back on most 3D work. A majority of 3D art work I've seen usually conveys more on the technical achievements rather than the artistic message.

I think it's important to gain insights on how to rig within both Maya AND 3dsmax. While learning both Maya and 3dsmax rigging techniques, try tackling the different ways of scipting the various motion controllers within both of these applications. Here's a suggestion to include within your portfolio - find a problem with your character's animation setup, identify the problem to your portfolio's audience and reveal the solution that solved the problem you raised. That will speak more about your abilities on finding your way out of difficult animation situation with a limited rigging skillset to any employer.

I've heard there's some value to understanding how to use Alias MotionBuilder. Being able to rig characters ready for use within MotionBuilder may be an added extension to your portfolio of skills.

I would choose a human rig and a four-leg animal rig for my portfolio.

twedzel
02-20-2006, 04:32 PM
Demonstrate problem solving skills using the tools available to you. The advice virtual Mesh gave about showing your solution to a problem encountered is good.

I wouldn't bother learning multiple packages. Rigging requires in depth knowledge of the ins and outs of a software package. I'd concentrate my efforts on the package most used by the industry you are trying for.

I would stay away from things that are tutorial-ish or have well established solutions available. For example focusing on a solution for a stretchy-spine or ik-fk blending isn't going to impress anyone unless you handle it's implementation/control in a novel way.

Show that your setups are animator friendly. Show the rigs in action. Through this you should be demostrating good fundamental skills. Show the rigs are stable in the extreme ranges of motion as possible.

eek
02-21-2006, 06:39 AM
hi,

Well i have two reels, one animation one rigging. With the rigging reel i show:

Facial setup
Facial Gui
bipeds
quadrapeds
local controlls
r&d
scripts
cloth

most of this is production proven which is important. Plus make stuff thats unique and stands out. Dont follow the herd.

eek

fritz8th
02-21-2006, 06:04 PM
Hi eek
First thanks for the reply to the post good info I had one question for you though what is r&d I could be setting myself up for a easy answer but I just wanted to make sure about what it was. Also when you said you had cloth on your rigging reel was that rigged cloth or actual cloth run by a sim. Asking because at my school the rigging teacher told me they are now teaching mayas cloth in the rigging class. Thanks for the geat feedback and help.
Dan

hi,

Well i have two reels, one animation one rigging. With the rigging reel i show:

Facial setup
Facial Gui
bipeds
quadrapeds
local controlls
r&d
scripts
cloth

most of this is production proven which is important. Plus make stuff thats unique and stands out. Dont follow the herd.

eek

fritz8th
02-21-2006, 06:45 PM
Hi vituralmesh

Thanks for a great reply to my question you gave me alot of good informationon about my topic. Also went to the book store and checked out the book you talked about, that's a very good book im gonna try and pick it up here in a couple of days.

A question I had though when you were talking about the muscular system driving the bones did you mean with soft bodies or by something else. Just because im really only used to using soft bodies. Also I have been messing around with 3dmax (started in maya) but I have only used the biped rig so far but from what I have seen the physique enegine in 3dsmax8 gives a very good rig with a little amount of time, i know that the biped is not very hard to do but I just wanted to start out with something easy for the first project but I have not tried do it the old fashion way yet by just placing each bone. Thanks again for the great advice and tips.
Dan

eek
02-21-2006, 06:48 PM
r&d = research and development. So i show production proven work, and development stuff that could go on to be developed further. Eg stretch elastigirl rig. So a good mixture. Your showing off your skills, plus build good solid rigs and have an open mind to new ideas.

eek

fritz8th
02-21-2006, 06:53 PM
Hi twedzel

Thanks for input on the topic. I had a question for you do you think It would matter if I used mocap or hand animation to show off the rig in action. I do know motion builder but I aslo know that one of my animation teachers here at school hates any one using mocap. Im sure its a prefence thing but I wasnt sure if on a reel if the industry would rather see hand animation done on the character. Again thanks for the input.
Dan

Demonstrate problem solving skills using the tools available to you. The advice virtual Mesh gave about showing your solution to a problem encountered is good.

I wouldn't bother learning multiple packages. Rigging requires in depth knowledge of the ins and outs of a software package. I'd concentrate my efforts on the package most used by the industry you are trying for.

I would stay away from things that are tutorial-ish or have well established solutions available. For example focusing on a solution for a stretchy-spine or ik-fk blending isn't going to impress anyone unless you handle it's implementation/control in a novel way.

Show that your setups are animator friendly. Show the rigs in action. Through this you should be demostrating good fundamental skills. Show the rigs are stable in the extreme ranges of motion as possible.

fritz8th
02-21-2006, 06:55 PM
Ok I was pretty sure thats what you were talking about but just wanted to make sure. Sorry for the simple question. Thanks for the reply.
Dan

r&d = research and development. So i show production proven work, and development stuff that could go on to be developed further. Eg stretch elastigirl rig. So a good mixture. Your showing off your skills, plus build good solid rigs and have an open mind to new ideas.

eek

fritz8th
02-21-2006, 06:58 PM
Hey everybody just wanted to say thanks for all the input and good advice.

Dan

twedzel
02-22-2006, 12:51 AM
Mocap or hand animation???? I'd say it depends what you are gearing your rig towards. If it's a mocap rig, then show it mocaped... if you are rigging for animators then show how your rig controls are manipulated by animators. If its a combo then do either or both.

But a little inside hint, if you are going for a general rigging job which is going to be geared towards a pipeline involving animators... people generally like to hire riggers who can animate or have a background in animation. You speak the same language to each other. Makes it so much easier for everybody. Nothing worse for an animator than getting a rig full of techno babble and automated to the hilt uncontrols. Demonstrating some facility with animation can be a bonus. Just don't do it if your animation sucks. Then get someone else to animate your rigs and credit them on your reel.

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