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synce
12-25-2005, 05:42 PM
I've tested Photoshop in the past, and it didn't seem nearly as full-featured as Painter (in terms of natural media), yet I see many artists here using Photoshop to create artwork. Why do you use Photoshop instead of Painter, which is designed specifically for artwork? General input is all that's needed. Thank you.

berniebernie
12-25-2005, 08:21 PM
perhaps the layers system is more intuitive, and the ability to have filters/image transformation quite easily ?

roguenroll
12-26-2005, 03:14 AM
for me I started w/ photoshop, but the filters, layers, blending modes, clip groups, and masking, etc are much more of what I like. Painter I do like for the textured painting and such and rotating canvas, but seems a little restricting coming from ps, thats just me.

but painter is a very interesting program, definately. I wouldnt mind experimenting going
back a forth to get the best of both. I might try that.

BlueFlare
12-26-2005, 05:59 PM
Why do you use Photoshop instead of Painter, which is designed specifically for artwork?I don't care about natural media brushes. If I want to make an image look like an oil painting then I will paint in oil and not digital, I think it looks fake, but that's just personal.

I also don't feel like spending extra money and time on yet another product, when I have years of experience with Photoshop, a product that's not just focused on painting, a product I also feel very comfortable with. And let's be honest, does it really matter which software you use? A look at the galleries just confirms that it doesn't matter which product you use, software doesn't make you an artist.

Like I said, this is all my personal opinion, but hopefully it can help you to make your own descision, good luck ;)

Ian Jones
12-27-2005, 02:00 AM
"A look at the galleries just confirms that it doesn't matter which product you use, software doesn't make you an artist."

Agreed. A very strong point as always.

EricUNSL
12-27-2005, 06:25 AM
I don't care about natural media brushes. If I want to make an image look like an oil painting then I will paint in oil and not digital, I think it looks fake, but that's just personal.

I also don't feel like spending extra money and time on yet another product, when I have years of experience with Photoshop, a product that's not just focused on painting, a product I also feel very comfortable with. And let's be honest, does it really matter which software you use? A look at the galleries just confirms that it doesn't matter which product you use, software doesn't make you an artist.


Well said. And before this becomes another "what's better PS or painter?" discussion I'll say this, as long as it's an impressive painting nobody other than us art geeks really cares what tool you used. Oils or acrylics / painter or photoshop. same thing in my eyes. I work between the two nowadays and love/hate both equally. I've seen photoshop work that I could swear was done in painter and vice versa. Both are designed for artwork but it has a greater deal to do with the skills of the artist using the tools. The software is secondary to the talent.

DHC
12-27-2005, 07:50 AM
Photoshop works. Painter gives too much errors. (Brush stroke error, Slow run time, "Out of memoery Errors", Crashes here and there, did I mention it runs slow?)

Ian Jones
12-27-2005, 09:51 AM
A benefit not mentioned, just to needs to be said... that painters tablet support is more complete. Again, it's not really the tool that matters... but if your buying I guess you'd want these details.

CIM
12-27-2005, 12:03 PM
It's a no-brainer, to anyone who has used both, that Painter is better for painting. However, the overall theme of this thread is true: if you know how to paint, you can get good results out of even Ms Paint. Use whichever program fulfills your needs, or use both like many do.

Jack Youngblood
12-27-2005, 05:21 PM
The painting facility of PS is more buried and less user friendly than Painter. But remember: both sets of brushes were designed by the same guy. Very similar functionality.

powerwave3d
12-28-2005, 11:30 AM
Personally, what I think painter has over photoshop is the ability to dynamically rotate the canvas... I have yet to discover that feature in photoshop and if it does exist, please someone tell me how to use it.

But, like said above, try both, see what you like. Painter is 50% of the cost of Photoshop as well.

CIM
12-28-2005, 12:19 PM
Personally, what I think painter has over photoshop is the ability to dynamically rotate the canvas... I have yet to discover that feature in photoshop and if it does exist, please someone tell me how to use it.

But, like said above, try both, see what you like. Painter is 50% of the cost of Photoshop as well.

There are rumors that Photoshop CS3 will adopt some of Painter's better features--one of them being the easily rotatable canvas.

L.Rawlins
12-28-2005, 08:40 PM
There are rumors that Photoshop CS3 will adopt some of Painter's better features--one of them being the easily rotatable canvas.

...

Please excuse me whilst I go and explode in giddy delirium... :)

evanfotis
01-12-2006, 07:03 PM
Funny or not, rotating the canvas is one of the most important features while drawing to get better strokes. And Painter has included this feature from the begining.

It comes closer to real drawing, where the artist very often rotates his sketchpad/canvas to get the stroke he needs with a flow, 'cause our brain/hands is not programmed to be as fluent in drawing from whatever angle...Just try drawing with your left hand if you're right handed.

Even tablets should have this option, its not that difficult to add a base that rotates.
For whoever wants to try this using his tablet, just go down the hardware store and buy one of these cheap plastic rotating bases. You'll see the difference.

Matellis
01-12-2006, 07:56 PM
i do most of my painting in photoshop (love the layer system) but when it comes time to do lighting thats usually when I go into painter. Both have strong points and I like to take advantage of both for what they are good at.

Neil
01-12-2006, 09:44 PM
i think it has to do with costs. PS is very versatile and as users, it's easier to just buy 1 title and make it work as much as possible. but if you got the $$, then of course you start specializing.

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