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Rebeccak
12-21-2005, 08:47 AM
Guys and gals,

Color Theory is a topic which has come up a lot lately, as it should, so at ericyeo's request I've decided to create a Color Theory thread here which relates to Color in general, and to the Human Figure in particular.

This is NOT a formal Workshop. This is a place for people to exchange ideas, post links, etc. ~ I'll periodically update the Links list at the start of the thread in order to make things easier to find.

Hope you guys will begin to contribute to this thread, and to help one another out by sharing your knowledge, questions, and suggestions. :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

Rebeccak
12-21-2005, 08:48 AM
Color Theory Links:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/ArtSchool/...eory/index.html (http://www.wetcanvas.com/ArtSchool/Color/ColorTheory/index.html)

http://thepolyparrot.com/colors.html

http://www.utdallas.edu/~mel024000/pages/color.html (http://www.utdallas.edu/%7Emel024000/pages/color.html)

http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/color12.html#warmcool

Something about color theory
http://www.worqx.com/color/index.htm

Tool for creating color schemes
http://www.steeldolphin.com/color_scheme.html

Just few tricks with color
http://www.echalk.co.uk/amusements/...Perception.html (http://www.echalk.co.uk/amusements/OpticalIllusions/colourPerception/colourPerception.html)

A great Color Tutorial / Exercise by Sheff:
http://www.pixelcolada.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=19&sid=c7b64b6a4f7a62e16ea2532f5dbf8291

EDIT:

Color Theory on Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_theory

Rebeccak
12-21-2005, 08:50 AM
Links to Color Theory Demos:

Demo 1: Digital - Look at the Reference Image in Different Ways (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showpost.php?p=2926397&postcount=7)
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showpost.php?p=2926397&postcount=7

Demo 2: Color Basics:


http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/color-demo.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/color-demo-3.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/color-demo-4.jpg

the following image is from: http://www.worqx.com/color/images/shade-tint-wheel.jpg
see full article: http://www.worqx.com/color/shade_tint.htm

http://www.worqx.com/color/images/shade-tint-wheel.jpg

In this diagram from the above source, tints are toward the center, and shades toward the outer rings of the color wheel.


According to this article: http://www.worqx.com/color/color_basics.htm

hue = what we think of as 'color'. 'Color' is actually defined by a bunch of different properties as described here.

tint = a hue produced by adding white.
shade = a hue produced by adding black.
intensity = the brightness or dullness of a hue. One may lower the intensity by adding white or black.

value = A measure of the amount of light reflected from a hue. Those hues with a high content of white have a higher luminance or value.

Rebeccak
12-21-2005, 08:52 AM
Links to Color Theory Exercises:

Rebeccak
12-21-2005, 08:53 AM
Artist Links:

Rebeccak
12-21-2005, 08:54 AM
Color Theory History:

Rebeccak
12-21-2005, 09:11 AM
Demo 1: Digital - Look at the Reference Image in Different Ways

This was originally posted on OFDW 009. The painting was done by ericyeo, and I just did the breakdown. Here is the same post as is on OFDW 009:

Sometimes, with respect to color, it helps to break the Reference image in a number of different ways: by desaturating the image, adding a filter to the image so that you can see the color more simply, etc. Here are a few examples of what I mean:

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/OFDW%20009/ericyeo_rev-2.jpg

I think the main thing to be aware of with respect to the colors in your piece is COLOR TEMPERATURE. Colors can be either warm or cool, and while the colors in the Reference image are mostly warm, I think the colors in your image are mostly cool. This is a big thing to consider with respect to color.

Also, think of color in the body in terms of ZONES. Note how in the Reference photo, the legs and arms are warmer / darker. Darker areas of the body indicate more blood circulation at the surface of those areas. The head, arms, and legs will naturally be darker.
Notice how the torso is more pink than red / brown. This is a good rule to remember when painting people.

Rebeccak
12-21-2005, 09:20 AM
Everyone,

Please feel free to post your ideas, links, questions, demos, whatever you feel might be relevant to the topic of this thread: COLOR. This is not a formal Workshop, it is primarily so that everyone can interact and share their questions and ideas with respect to how color is used in the depiction of the human figure. The first few threads are for organizational purposes only. :)

Please pitch in! :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

Slux
12-21-2005, 02:17 PM
Hi
Interesting topic ... I will have to spent some time studying it ... but there is so many things to study :D ....

Here are some links that may (or may not) be interesting

Something about color theory
http://www.worqx.com/color/index.htm

Tool for creating color schemes
http://www.steeldolphin.com/color_scheme.html

Just few tricks with color :D
http://www.echalk.co.uk/amusements/OpticalIllusions/colourPerception/colourPerception.html

- Slux

Mu
01-08-2006, 09:46 PM
Hi everyone,

I am so completely new to color theory and most of the time clueless or confused when it comes to color.

With the help of Rebecca I learned to actually perceive values and understood that it is value not color which defines forms. Now I am trying to understand the use of color so someday I can expand my skills and technique by applying color to my values.

As this topic is such a multitudinous one I jumped in at a basic level. With the exercises that follow this text I was trying to understand the color wheel and primary color,secondary color etc. and color pallette/color combinations, as introduced in this tutorial (http://www.worqx.com/color/combinations.htm). It might be a good idea to keep this page open in a separate tab of your browser to compare the colour wheel info to the sketches.

I tried to keep functional use of colour in mind, too. I tried to give the faraway mountain to the right blueish hues and more saturated colours in direct lit spots.
However, that is not what this exercise is about. I just tried to learn how to combine colors. Also, this is not about handling complicated forms...

This is my sketch. Numbers refer to planned values, i.e. 1 = very high, 4 very dark....

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c4/mkayi/colortheory_1_sketch.jpg

analogous color combination:

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c4/mkayi/analogous.jpg

complementary colour combination:

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c4/mkayi/complement.jpg

double Complementary Combination:

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c4/mkayi/dblComplement.jpg

monochromatic:

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c4/mkayi/monochromatic.jpg

split Complementary Colour Combination:

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c4/mkayi/splitComplement.jpg

triad Colour combination:

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c4/mkayi/triad.jpg

So, I must say it was fun to combine these colors knowing that I would use sets which are not completely chosen "out of thin air". Feel free to comment on this, direct me to my next steps. I still feel a little bit lost in this vast topic, but will continue to hack a swath through this jungle...

Any help from anyone is appreciated!

Mu
01-08-2006, 09:52 PM
something that added to my confusion is that my current application's (artweaver) color wheel does not look like anything mentioned in the above tutorials like this one. (http://www.worqx.com/color/color_wheel.htm)
In artweaver's color wheel, complementary colours do not lie opposite of each other,e.g.

Artweaver Color Wheel:
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c4/mkayi/artweaverColorWheel.jpg


Looks like artweaver uses a completely different wheel which makes it hard to follow these tasks. Does anyone know what system the colorwheel of the above screenshot uses?

I am about to purchase painter. Hope the color wheel of painter correlates with the theoretical color wheels? Or can you choose from different multiple color wheels in painter?

Rebeccak
01-08-2006, 10:11 PM
Ok, Mr. Mu, :)

You brought it, so I'm going to try to address it. :D

Here, I've found a bunch of images where the chief subject is color. Large images I've just left as links.

What I'd like you to do is not worry right away about the names of things ~ triadic, split complementary, complementary ~ these are all terms that I learned long ago, but frankly don't think much about as I paint. It's not to say that these terms aren't important ~ but I think it's better to just jump right in at first and then we can try to sort through the problem areas. Particularly as this is not really a formal workshop, just a discussion, I'd rather just takes things in a very low~jargon way. I'm no color professor. :)

Having said that, I think a great exercise to do (and one which I did whilst a color theory student) is to copy, in whatever medium you prefer, a photograph where color is prominent.

Why not choose 2~3 images from the following group, and start working on a loose copy / painting? Don't worry about details or getting the image to look accurate. In fact, if you would like, feel free to trace the image ~ this is not a drawing exercise, it is about color. Your final images will not be portfolio pieces ~ they will be merely exercises.

Give yourself a limited amount of time ~ let's say 1 week ~ to get the basics of at least one image down on canvas / paper / in pixels. Then, let's see where you're at, and we'll talk amongst ourselves. :)

Now, it's quite obvious that the Reference images are not of the Human Figure ~ but I think it's wise to take something easier, like a landscape, to copy as it will eliminate the problem of the figure, and allow us to focus strictly on Color as a subject. The goal is to eventually be able to apply the concepts learned here to the figure in other Exercises.

Anyone else who feels so inclined is welcome to join us here in this little exercise / experiment. I just ask that you keep your images to 800 X 600 pixels or less.

Looking forward to seeing your results! :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

Please choose 1 ~ 3 images from the following set to copy in any media:

Then, post your work in 1 week from the time you start the exercise.

Please keep images to 800 x 600 px or less.

Good luck!



http://pinker.wjh.harvard.edu/photos/cape_cod_II/images/Hopper%20landscape.jpg
http://pinker.wjh.harvard.edu/photos/cape_cod_II/images/Hopper%20landscape.jpg

http://www.langebaaninfo.com/image_photo_gallery/landscape/images/langebaan_sunset_jpg.jpg
http://www.langebaaninfo.com/image_photo_gallery/landscape/images/langebaan_sunset_jpg.jpg

Image Link: >>>http://www.imaginature.us/Gallery/Canyon%20Dusk%20II.jpg<<< (http://www.imaginature.us/Gallery/Canyon%20Dusk%20II.jpg)

http://www.astrosurf.org/lombry/Images/sunset-antarctique.jpg

http://www.terrapin-gardens.com/perennials/photos/oenothera-lemon-sunset-m.jpg

Image Link: >>>http://www.tropicalisland.de/DPS%20Bali%20Ubud%20Puri%20Lukisan%20Art%20Museum%20garden%20lotus%20flower%20b.jpg<<< (http://www.tropicalisland.de/DPS%20Bali%20Ubud%20Puri%20Lukisan%20Art%20Museum%20garden%20lotus%20flower%20b.jpg)

Image Link: >>>http://fiesta.bren.ucsb.edu/~mchen/MyAlbum/UCSB/WhiteSand%20-shadow.jpg<<< (http://fiesta.bren.ucsb.edu/%7Emchen/MyAlbum/UCSB/WhiteSand%20-shadow.jpg)

http://www.anbg.gov.au/anbg/booking-facilities/images/brittle-gum-lawn-800.jpg
http://www.anbg.gov.au/anbg/booking-facilities/images/brittle-gum-lawn-800.jpg

Mu
01-08-2006, 10:35 PM
Ok, Mr. Mu, :)

You brought it, so I'm going to try to address it. :D



yea I asked for trouble, didn't I?:scream:


The goal is to eventually be able to apply the concepts learned here to the figure in other Exercises.

*feels thouroughly understood*
exactly!:thumbsup:



Oh, this is going to be great! And the photos look like thy are apt to drive me insane... which, strangely enough, for this task is a good thing.:bounce:

Rebeccak
01-08-2006, 10:39 PM
LOL ~ it's funny, it's kind of a nice break to look at something besides figures for a change ~ I feel like I've been let out of doors! :)

Looking forward to seeing your first posts. Feel free, as always, to post WIP along the way.

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Mu
01-13-2006, 05:12 PM
just to let you know I started this one...

(how come all the threads I work on at the moment have turned into private tuitions? That's somehow embarrassing...:blush: )


http://img496.imageshack.us/img496/1710/floweri3kj.jpg

Rebeccak
01-14-2006, 06:34 AM
Mr. Mu,

By no means is this a perfect or finished paintover, but here is a suggestion for the direction I think it might be better to go in ~ more blues, more deep bluish~greens, and more saturated colors generally. Take a look at the following and let me know if you have any questions. :)

Bear in mind that I'm using Photoshop, and so have access to a broader toolset which I have employed ~ however, once you get Painter, you should have an even broader toolset than that. :)

Reference image:

http://www.tropicalisland.de/DPS%20Bali%20Ubud%20Puri%20Lukisan%20Art%20Museum%20garden%20lotus%20flower%20b.jpg

Your original image.

I think the thing to try first is to lay down a more saturated base coat, and don't go for whites. If you put whites in from the start, the effect will be to flatten / deaden your picture. Use white sparingly ~ always try to put a bit of color into your whites ~ the same with blacks. Try to avoid pure white and pure black when possible. Use shades (darkened in terms of value) of hues to create your shadow areas, and tints (lightened in terms of values) of hues to create areas of light.



http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/flower-small-1.jpg

Note that my steps here are kind of random:

1. My main suggestion is to fill the entire background from the start ~ as with the black and white studies, so with color ~ all values / hues are relative and you want to establish the major key first. Here we're thinking mostly deep blues / greens with tinges of purples and some accents of yellow and here and there some desaturated oranges.

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/flower-small-2.jpg

Colors will all look differently depending on which colors they are placed next to ~ you just have to go with your gut instinct, lay down some colors, and then tweak them to make them either more or less saturated, a different hue, a different tint (lighter) a different shade (darker) etc.

The key thing to bear in mind is that you won't be able to replicate the colors of the world perfectly ~ often you must exxaggerate and refine color relationships to get the effect that you want. Don't try to copy the photo exactly ~ work on color relationships, and see what actually happens on the page.

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/flower-small-3.jpg

I've added the darker and midtone values / hues first. Next I'm starting to build up the lighter areas on top.

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/flower-small-4.jpg

Rebeccak
01-14-2006, 06:35 AM
Just continuing to refine the relationships of hue, value, and saturation...most of it is frankly mucking about, trial and error.

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/flower-small-5.jpg

Here I've merged all of my layers in PS and increased the Brightness and Contrast.

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/flower-small-6.jpg

Adding deeper blues to accent some of the midtone and light edges of the flowers.

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/flower-small-7.jpg

This I would say is about a halfway point in terms of a painting ~ but it gives the basic idea. Note that there are hue contrasts as well as contrasts of value and saturation. Using Color is sort of like flying a kite with these 3 separate strings used to manipulate it. The more you work with these properties of Color, the more comfortable you will feel.

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/flower-small-8.jpg

Hope this helps. :) Like I say, I'm not really a Color teacher ~ but am happy to try to help.

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

Gunilla
01-14-2006, 09:54 AM
something that added to my confusion is that my current application's (artweaver) color wheel does not look like anything mentioned in the above tutorials like this one. (http://www.worqx.com/color/color_wheel.htm)
In artweaver's color wheel, complementary colours do not lie opposite of each other,e.g.

Artweaver Color Wheel:
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c4/mkayi/artweaverColorWheel.jpg


Looks like artweaver uses a completely different wheel which makes it hard to follow these tasks. Does anyone know what system the colorwheel of the above screenshot uses?



It looks like the printmakers colorwheel, you got an example of it on the page you linked to
http://www.worqx.com/color/images/printers-triangle.gif
The printwheel has some limitations since not all colors are possible to mix clean - feel free to disagree with me here :)

And hi Becca!

Rebeccak
01-14-2006, 01:38 PM
Gunie,

Thanks for this! :) Please help me out in any way you can ~ I'm no color expert, and think of colors more intuitively now than technically. So any advice and tips here is welcome! :thumbsup:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Gunilla
01-15-2006, 09:01 AM
Gunie,

Thanks for this! :) Please help me out in any way you can ~ I'm no color expert, and think of colors more intuitively now than technically. So any advice and tips here is welcome! :thumbsup:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

It's the same here, I'm afraid - I don't think much about it when I work. I've been a bit into it when it comes to traditional, non-digital paint - so if any questions regarding that will turn up I might jump in. Will keep an eye on this thread for sure :)

Rebeccak
01-15-2006, 01:03 PM
Originally posted by Gunie: It's the same here, I'm afraid - I don't think much about it when I work. I've been a bit into it when it comes to traditional, non-digital paint - so if any questions regarding that will turn up I might jump in. Will keep an eye on this thread for sure :)
Thanks Gunie! :thumbsup:

Mu
01-15-2006, 03:34 PM
so,

Use white sparingly ~ always try to put a bit of color into your whites

Will eliminate these in the next step. So I guess it's similar to laying down values? Start from the middle values and add the highlights and shadows later on?

just quickly trying to tune in to the blue hues here...

http://img510.imageshack.us/img510/3709/flowerii8ni.jpg

and a quick comparison... which shows how much I am lost initially when choosing colors - would have never seen the blue hues.

http://img510.imageshack.us/img510/6205/flowercomparison3jw.jpg

will continue from here, now.

Rebeccak
01-15-2006, 05:22 PM
Mr. Mu,

Looking good so far. :)

My main suggestion would be to start with more saturated hues here ~ you can always gray things down (and yes, of course you can also always re~saturate them) ~ but given that our tendency is to start with less saturated hues, it's best to just sort of jump in there and lay everything out on the table in terms of saturation. :) It's a necessary step toward overcoming timidity towards color.

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/Mr-Mu_1.jpg

The other thing I would suggest would be to darken the bkgrd a bit ~ again ~ throw in all the ingredients before mixing things up. And definitely work from your midtones UP in saturation and value, and DOWN in saturation and value.

Keep going! You're determination is impressive Mr. Mu! :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Mu
01-15-2006, 11:13 PM
It's a necessary step toward overcoming timidity towards color.

wow, I feel caught in the act, now. That's exactly the reason why I made this choices, albeit not being aware of it.

'kay

*takes a deep breath*

Rebeccak
01-15-2006, 11:15 PM
Color can't hurt you, Mr. Mu. :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

DivineRAiN
01-16-2006, 11:43 PM
this is an interesting subject.. I read a little on color theory but nothing about it ever stuck with me. So far I have very little experience with digital painting.. basically I deal with color more often when I'm working on terragen scenes. (and no experience with traditional painting) Lastnight I started to try the flower. If this wasn't about trying to copy a picture, I probably would've picked desaturated colors because I tend to like how they look.. but the final result never looks good the next day.

This still needs a lot of work, I didn't start adding any greens to the background and so on. I used procreate painter that came with the tablet. Planning to get painter IX this summer.

http://hometown.aol.com/divinerain/images/wip2a.jpg

Rebeccak
01-17-2006, 01:39 AM
DivineRAiN,

Welcome to the Anatomy Forum! :)

Good to see you here, Mr. Mu will be happy that he is no longer alone in his private 'tuition'. :)

I think what you have so far is quite good, particularly considering that you haven't painted much before. :)

I think the next thing to think about with respect to your color study is the fact that the background is just as saturated as the foreground object / flower ~ it's good that you've gone the opposite extreme of your (and most folks') tendency to undersaturate their pictures, but now I think it's time to change course and desaturate the background colors a bit so that the background does not compete so much with the foreground.

What happens is that more saturated objects tend to come forward in space, while less saturated objects tend to recede in space. You can see this quite clearly in any mountain scene, where the atmospheric perspective ~ eg, dust and pollutants in the air ~ makes farther objects seem duskier.

http://ecycletours.com/images/Images04/Dolo%20Digitals/Cortina%20mountain%20vistas.jpg
http://ecycletours.com/images/Images04/Dolo%20Digitals/Cortina%20mountain%20vistas.jpg

Notice how in this mountain scene, the trees and grass in the foreground are really saturated, with the mountain in the background being more muted / blue~grayish.

Try the same sort of thing with the flower image. Looking forward to your update! :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

DivineRAiN
01-17-2006, 02:19 AM
thanks Rebecca for the welcome and I'll try to keep your words in mind when I work on this tonight. Nice picture to illustrate exactly what you're talking about.

DivineRAiN
01-17-2006, 08:27 AM
worked on this for more than a few hours tonight, it doesn't feel like I spent so much time on it.

http://hometown.aol.com/divinerain/images/flower2a.jpg

Mu
01-17-2006, 08:43 AM
Mr. Mu will be happy that he is no longer alone in his private 'tuition'.


I am indeed!:applause:

divineRAin - I am not much of an authority when it comes to colours, but I like your painting. The detailed objects stand out very pleasantly when compared tothe fuzzy background!

DivineRAiN
01-17-2006, 08:18 PM
hi Mr Mu, thanks.. you're nice. Didja get painter IX yet? Lookin forward to seeing an update from ya

Mu
01-17-2006, 08:30 PM
no, no painter yet:cry:

they must have sent it via pony express:scream:

update: today, today - back in a sec...

Mu
01-17-2006, 09:23 PM
still no details,

this time I had to completely change the hues I used, because when I used more saturated tones I realized I had chosen a wrong hue from the start!

:eek:

So, another important thing I learned here:
*starts scribbling*

saturated hues = easier to check!

http://img487.imageshack.us/img487/7788/floweriii1zh.jpg

Rebeccak
01-17-2006, 09:31 PM
Mr. Mu,

Hey now, I'm quite impressed! :) While I think the original photo leans more to the bluish in the background, I really don't care so long as the hues and their various properties which you select resonate with one another, as they really are doing here. :)

I quite like where the deep pink/orange of the flower in the upper right of the picture plane meets the aqua~green of the background...I think that's really working well ~ actually, I think the picture as a whole is working well, though some accents of purple and blue might help to punch up the background. Also adding a light, desaturated orange in a limited way for the stalk might really help to set things off. Color is all about relationships ~ not just quality, but also about quantity of hue, value, and saturation.

Will you be working on this further?

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Mu
01-17-2006, 09:46 PM
Will you be working on this further?

muahaha:scream:... ..............:curious: you are kidding, right?

of course! I just started! I am only just beginning to understand the lesson you set before my nose with these photo refs and I won't stop until I immersed in this topic so far I can study things on my own accord further (so I won't need private tuition for every new prob...)

I want to reach that level I have with greyscale values now: I have understood what I need to learn so I can mind my steps single-handed (with support given when I blindly stumble onto difficult ground, like in the OFDWs, you know?)

So, to cut a long sentence short: erm, yes, I will continue.


By now you might have guessed that this flower is not the only but the first ref I chose to work on...


*shakes head in disbelief*

thought you knew me better by now....:wise:

:)

Rebeccak
01-18-2006, 02:31 AM
DivineRAiN,

I think you have a great start here. :) I've taken the liberty of doing a paintover of your piece ~ do you mind if I post it? Some people don't like paintovers, so if you would rather I just make verbal comments, let me know.

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

DivineRAiN
01-18-2006, 09:50 PM
Mr Mu your's is coming along nicely I think.. but I'm no expert on this subject. I like what you're doing with the background.

Rebecca, no way, I don't mind at all. Sometimes paintovers happen in Stahlberg's body topology thread to show what's trying to be explained in words.. the visual thing is helpful.
No offense taken here, I'd like to see it

Rebeccak
01-18-2006, 09:54 PM
DivineRAiN,

Thank you. :) Here is the paintover sequence ~ I hope it helps:


http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/Divine-Rain_1.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/Divine-Rain_2.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/Divine-Rain_3.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/Divine-Rain_4.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/Divine-Rain_5.jpg

Rebeccak
01-18-2006, 09:56 PM
Please note that after blurring the top merged image layer, I erased that layer in the area of the flowers to reveal the unblurred layers below (this was done to give the background a blurred effect, while preserving the relative sharpness of the foreground flowers). Also note that I left areas around the petals' edges a bit blurred.



http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/Divine-Rain_6.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/Divine-Rain_7.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/Divine-Rain_8.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/Divine-Rain_9.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/Divine-Rain_10.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/Divine-Rain_11.jpg

While not a finished painting, I hope this is useful in terms of giving some ideas in terms of how to tweak and enrich color in a painting ~ let me know what you think.

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Mu
01-18-2006, 10:13 PM
You know, about increasing brightness and contrast, I tested that while working on my image, too and also found it could use the boost.
What made me not do it, though, was the fact that while I could have produced a better image I would not have understood what exactly happened.

Don't get me wrong - I am lazy as hell and praise all instant-remedy solutions and don't feel I should not use filters etc for any reason (I mean, it's all digital, anyway, I am not a purist)

But I want to understand what I do.

Now, I see that increasing contrast/brightness for example does that painting good. But how can it be done manually, for instance?
What does actually happen? Setting off edges and using higher values throughout the painting? Is that something you would do manually from the beginning when you paint?

I hope I got my confusion across... :argh:

DivineRAiN
01-19-2006, 01:02 AM
Wow-- that does make the flower stand out and shine. Under normal circumstances the blur would be added to a version that has most (if not all) of your basic colors down?.. and then add the detail after? Or get some detail down before the blur?

Now that you have me thinking about it Mr Mu, I never considered myself to be a purist either, but I don't know why I don't add bright/contrast to the things I paint. I add them to my Terragen renders when I think it's needed, auto-levels and sharpening too. First time around I guess I misunderstood your post, it seemed like you didn't know what effect adding bright/contrast has on an image, so I thought a good way to show the difference is with a washed out terragen render. But I first found an eye so I didn't have to look who knows where on my computer for a washed out render. The eye is a good example. LoL This is really bad. I was trying to follow Linda's painting an eye tutorial.

In her thread I posted my eye pic that is similar to the top left one... why I thought I was done I don't know. Why it didn't occure to me to add some contrast, dunno. The bottom left has a lil gauss blur on a layer with low opacity.

http://hometown.aol.com/divinerain/images/aneyething2.jpg

Rebeccak
01-19-2006, 01:45 AM
Mr. Mu,

I think this little color tutorial can explain it better than I can: :)

http://www.worqx.com/color/color_basics.htm

Basically, I've done several different things to manipulate the image ~ some having to do with color properties, and some having to do with just general digital painting techniques (none of which are right or wrong, mind you). ;)

1.) I've increased the brightness and contrast of the overall image. This has an obvious effect we can all understand (though I was reading today that changing the brightness / contrast is not always the best thing to do with photographs).

2.) I've adjusted the hue and saturation of the image as a whole, and various parts of the image. I think this makes more sense if you are using Photoshop ~ my apologies, as I wrote the tutorial with DivineRAIN in mind, whom I assume uses Photoshop, and did not take into consideration that you are using a different paint package. (In fact, in light of that, your post now makes more sense to me. You'll have a lot more options similar to those in Photoshop once your copy of Painter arrives). ;)

3.) I've changed the hue in various places of the image by manipulating the selective color properties of the image. Again, my apologies as I really aimed the tut towards a Photoshop user, and forgot about the fact that these image adjustment controls do not exist in ArtRage. I see where you're coming from now.

Basically, if you are painting without fancy controls and sliders that make this work easier, it is all about simply using more saturated colors.

Ok, I think this might help to make more sense of things:

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/color-demo.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/color-demo-3.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/color-demo-4.jpg

the following image is from: http://www.worqx.com/color/images/shade-tint-wheel.jpg
see full article: http://www.worqx.com/color/shade_tint.htm

http://www.worqx.com/color/images/shade-tint-wheel.jpg

In this diagram from the above source, tints are toward the center, and shades toward the outer rings of the color wheel.

Various color related terms are confusing, and it helps to just show what they are ~ doh! *slaps forehead*.


According to this article: http://www.worqx.com/color/color_basics.htm

hue = what we think of as 'color'. 'Color' is actually defined by a bunch of different properties as described here.

tint = a hue produced by adding white.
shade = a hue produced by adding black.
intensity = the brightness or dullness of a hue. One may lower the intensity by adding white or black.

value = A measure of the amount of light reflected from a hue. Those hues with a high content of white have a higher luminance or value.

~~



So basically, what I effectively did in DivineRAIN's painting was to increase the intensity of the various hues (by increasing their saturation). I also increased the brightness/contrast which effectively changed the relationship of tinted and shaded (lightened and darkened) hues in his piece.

I know this is confusing to break color down into its various properties ~ but I hope this helps to make sense of things.

Anyone with something else to offer is more than welcome to do so here. :)

DivineRAiN,

Did you just now increase the brightness / contrast of your piece? A definite improvement. I hope the paintover was helpful.

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Rebeccak
01-19-2006, 02:14 AM
Also, here's a great interactive color website that everyone should take a look at:

http://www.poynterextra.org/cp/index.html

Mu
01-19-2006, 09:04 AM
Wow!

Err WOW!

I actually knew the color basics tutorial website you pointed me to from an earlier link, but your summary/synopsis rocks!
I feel I understand these terms much better, now!

And, as concerns artrage/photoshop features: nevermind!
I actually do have the chance to use contrast/brightness sliders and many other Photoshop-like features for my pics in the GIMP, for example, and I often have done so.
But when you suggested tweaking DivineRAin's painting like this it occured to me that I never truly understood what these sliders actually did.

Now this passage...:
So basically, what I effectively did in DivineRAIN's painting was to increase the intensity of the various hues (by increasing their saturation). I also increased the brightness/contrast which effectively changed the relationship of tinted and shaded (lightened and darkened) hues in his piece.

...hammered that home to me...

"like... totally, man!"

Thanks!


DivineRAin - thanks for sharing your enhanced eye-study. It is also very enlightening.
I think you increased my brightness...:scream:

Rebeccak
01-19-2006, 12:15 PM
Hey Mr. Mu, :)

You're welcome! These demos aren't going to go into any color books anytime too soon :D and they are in large part based off of what I remember from color class a long time ago and off of the online tutorial, but putting them together helped me to remember stuff, too. :) Color's a lot more complicated than it seems! :D Glad this could help. :)

Seriously take a look at that color link that follows the demo post ~ it's got some really excellent examples and is nice as it's interactive.

I've also put the above demo on the first page under 'Color Demos'. If anyone has any corrections or anything to add, please let me know.

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Mu
01-19-2006, 01:05 PM
I knew this interactive demo because it was linked as further reading in one of your "color theory"-links in the beginning of this thread.

Actually, I get the feeling, that with understanding colors it is much more a matter of practise than with anything else. It is like stumbling on blindly til you start to see shapes gradually.

Kindalikesortof

Rebeccak
01-19-2006, 02:18 PM
Mr. Mu,

I totally agree with what you say ~ understanding color is mainly a matter of practice ~ that is absolutely the case ~ bear in mind that I learned color as a traditional painter, and so my primary experience is of mixing real life paint. Paint differs from pixels, but the basic color property descriptions are the same. Both painting traditionally and digitally with color require practice ~ those little color swatches are instructive, but the real work involves a bit of elbow grease and just digging right in. :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

danielh68
01-20-2006, 08:04 PM
http://www.anbg.gov.au/anbg/booking-facilities/images/brittle-gum-lawn-800.jpg
I decided to use this one for reference. I changed the composition quite a bit.

http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/reb/color1.jpg

Great thread Rebeccak...I don't see how you manage all this stuff...you must be very busy. Hats off to ya! :thumbsup:

Rebeccak
01-20-2006, 08:07 PM
danielh68,

Great to see you on this thread! :thumbsup: I was hoping you'd find it...really looking forward to your contributions ~ I really love your sense of color and your sketches! :) Please post as much information and sketches here as you would like. :)

Will definitely take a look at this when I'm at home...and thank you for the feedback! :)

EDIT: I looked at your piece really briefly ~ nice start! Are you going to go for a realistic color scheme / or a more interpretive one? Either is fine with me. :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

danielh68
01-20-2006, 10:35 PM
Definitley interpretive :) I'm playing around with some theories developed by Charles Hawthorne. It has a lot to do with temperature, as well as, applying pure pigment to the canvass initally, then adding greys afterwards.

Spent a little more time during lunch break.

http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/reb/color2.jpg

danielh68
01-21-2006, 03:59 AM
Used this image but changed the composition around, along with some other stuff.

http://www.astrosurf.org/lombry/Images/sunset-antarctique.jpg

http://www.danielhelzer.com/sketches/sketch91.jpg

Rebeccak
01-21-2006, 01:24 PM
danielh68,

It's fantastic to have your participation here, I quite admire your style and dedication to digital painting...at some point, I hope you do a Tutorial here on your techniques and methods ~ I know you're constantly working to improve and try new things, and I think people here on the forum would really benefit from demos of how you work. :)

I am really partial to your second image ~ for me it has more emotional resonance. I think the critique I would have is that the icebergs need to have more substance / be darker in value somehow, as currently they are different in hue from their surroundings, but not much different in value...but I quite like the way you've contrasted textures in the sky and also value / hue.

I think you might quite like the work of a former teacher of mine, whose work can be found here:

http://www.jcacciolagallery.com/Pages/Artists/Turner.html

Really brilliant use of sunset / dusky / apocalyptic color ~ and his work has gotten better over time.

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

danielh68
01-21-2006, 06:19 PM
Thanks, Rebeccak.:)

About the tutorial...sure, I'll do one at some point if people are interested.

I enjoyed the link, excellent work. He wouldn't be related to "the" William Turner? His work has some similarities.

This morning, I worked a little bit more on the glacier piece. Although, I gotta go because my dog is badgering me --- he hasn't had his morning run, yet.

Thanks, again.

http://www.danielhelzer.com/sketches/sketch92.jpg

Rebeccak
01-21-2006, 06:34 PM
danielh68,

You're more than welcome! Woo, I really like this update...the far right glacier in particular I think is really nicely done...the foreground glacier still bothers me a bit, because of the hard edges I think...but I really like the direction you've taken this in. It's funny how a few changes can really affect the mood of a piece, no? I feel that this is much quieter, and a lot more thoughtful than the previous version. Color, but also texture, are certainly the responsible factors. I definitely think there would be interest in your tutorials. ;) Feel free to either post them here, or independently on the Anatomy Forum or elsewhere, and I'll link them in the first few posts. :)

BTW, no, the two Turners are not related, though I agree they share some similarities. ;)

http://www.impressionniste.net/monet_cathedrale_rouen.jpg

http://www.washacadsci.org/flowers/gladioli.Claude%20Monet.large.jpg

http://www.stitchability.co.uk/monet%20bridge.jpeg

http://www.jimloy.com/arts/monet24.jpg

Some works with which you are likely familiar by Monet...while Monet used light and sometimes 'fluffy' colors, his work was never 'fluffy' to my mind, and always seemed to have a depth as conveyed through both line and intensity of closely observed and imagined color combinations...while not my favorite artist, I certainly love his work for his brilliance. Do you have artists in particular whom you admire particularly for their sense of color?

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

danielh68
01-21-2006, 08:15 PM
Yeah, there's something about the foreground glacier that needs improvement. Like you said,
the hard edge is too constant. I might blend the "hardness" into a abstract shape as it reaches the edge of the canvass. I'll continue to fiddle with it.

In regards to "Colorists", I'm fond of all the masters from the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist periods.

Despite being very popular, Monet is one of my favorites in this category. I love all his garden pieces: lilies, Japanese bridge, etc. I was especially impressed when I witnessed them in person. Up close, they're very abstract.

I also like the portrait he did of his wife while she lay lifeless in her bed. Very strange, but I think it says a lot about his nickname "The Eye".

Here are some modern painters that I like:

Wolf Kahn:

http://www.etheringtonfineart.com/images/kahn/001_edgeofthebluewoods20x23.jpg

http://www.galeriebrockstedt.de/images/bildarchiv/9gross/kahn21.jpg

http://www.buehler-art.de/UPLOAD/t299.jpg

Wayne Thiebaud:

http://www.berggruen.com/files/4d04b45c.jpg

http://www.cirrusgallery.com/cirruspics/Tiebaud/Thiebaud_prnt_001-WT-87_candyapples_full.jpg

Frank Hyder:

http://205.238.27.158/images/photos/Vessel.jpg

http://www.lowegallery.com/frank_hyder/images/rythmindaylight.jpg

Arctis
01-21-2006, 08:15 PM
If you don't mind, I've made a quick paintover on your eye, just to show you that an eye is surrounded by muscles and the nose. If you underline their presence, even if it's a young woman, you'l have a more tangible character.
I personnaly think that young women are the most difficult type of body to draw, because you hardly see what's behind the skin. In consequence, it has to be underlined, otherwise it's shy.

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y60/Arctis/aneyething2.jpg

Rebeccak
01-21-2006, 08:23 PM
Originally posted by danielh68: In regards to "Colorists", I'm fond of all the masters from the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist periods.

Despite being very popular, Monet is one of my favorites in this category. I love all his garden pieces: lilies, Japanese bridge, etc. I was especially impressed when I witnessed them in person. Up close, they're very abstract.

I also like the portrait he did of his wife while she lay lifeless in her bed. Very strange, but I think it says a lot about his nickname "The Eye".
I know what you mean...though this portrait always struck me as somewhat heartless and cruel:

http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/fnart/art/19th/painting/monet_death.jpg

I think she was still alive at the time? Not sure.

I've also heard a quote said about Monet by his contemporaries, which goes something like, "Monet is only an eye...but what an eye". I've just googled the quote, and apparently the comment was made by Cezanne.

Thanks for posting those images of your fav artists...I love Thiebaud as well, but hadn't heard of Frank Hyder. Will have to look him up. :)

Arctis,

Nice job with the paintover ~ a different approach which I think is really helpful. :thumbsup:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

danielh68
01-21-2006, 08:31 PM
Yeah, I'm unsure whether she was dead or near-death. Nonethless, those are the exact feelings I have when I look at that piece.

Also, thanks for the exact quote -- my mind is fuzzy:)

Rebeccak
01-21-2006, 08:41 PM
No worries...I don't know why that quote has stuck with me, very little else does. :D

Glad I'm not the only one a little discomfited by that piece...:)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Mu
01-21-2006, 09:17 PM
Hi there,

first let me say: I am soo glad this is not anywhere near a private tuition for me anymore:scream:

So what did I do?
I was thinking about what Rebecca said about contrast/brightness.
But I wanted to test wether I was in control of these aspects of colour, so I manually adjusted contrast/brightness by choosing higher values, more saturated hues, and increasing the "distance" between tints and shades.

Hope you like it.

http://img521.imageshack.us/img521/648/flowerivmanuacontrast6od.jpg

Arctis - what a spectacular paintover! Anatomy background knowledge applied to color theory!

Daniel - don't know wether I actually ever said so, but I bookmarked your sketches-thread in my "favourite artists" gallery folder and highly appreciate your work here, because to my mind it is your color choices (among other things) which help to create your unique style.

*sigh*

forgive me - I am way too talkative...:rolleyes:

Rebeccak
01-21-2006, 09:23 PM
Mr. Mu,

Nice!!! :applause: A big kudos to you for not using the shortcut controls for brightness/contrast, and for really trying to grasp these concepts independently...well~done! :arteest:

The flower is now quite distinct from the background, due to the hue and saturation differences from the background, as well as due to it's relative sharpness as compared to the blurred quality of the background. This has come a long way from your initial piece ~ keep at this, I think you are quickly getting the hang of things! :wip:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

danielh68
01-22-2006, 02:15 AM
Here's another color study of this image http://www.tropicalisland.de/DPS%20...0flower%20b.jpg (http://www.tropicalisland.de/DPS%20Bali%20Ubud%20Puri%20Lukisan%20Art%20Museum%20garden%20lotus%20flower%20b.jpg). It's a great picture, but for a painting, the composition needed work. Consequently, I rearranged some things. :D

http://www.danielhelzer.com/sketches/sketch93.jpg

Rebeccak
01-22-2006, 02:21 AM
Ooh, really nice piece! :thumbsup: Your work reminds me a bit of that of Audrey Flack in terms of the brightness of the colors:

http://209.59.165.223/read/data/upimages/AudreyFlackCMYK.jpg
http://209.59.165.223/read/data/upimages/AudreyFlackCMYK.jpg

I like the compositional rearrangement as well ~ I think that it did need it for a painting, you're totally right! Well, I hate to say, but I think this is going to be a really pretty thread...:D :bounce:

Great to see your contribution here!

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

danielh68
01-22-2006, 02:41 AM
Thanks, Rebeccak.

I usually flatten my work as I progress through a painting. However, this time, I saved many stages. So, if someone is interested in a tutorial let me know.

I never heard of Audrey Flack, but he (she?) looks very interesting.

---------------

Mr. Mu, thanks a bunch :) I'm glad you like the thread...it encourages me to post more!

danielh68
01-22-2006, 02:53 AM
Worked a little bit more on this one...

http://www.danielhelzer.com/sketches/sketch94.jpg

Rebeccak
01-22-2006, 03:17 AM
danielh68,

Nice work! I like the progress on that front iceberg...really enjoying seeing your work...speaking of 'bergs...:)

this is a really poor reproduction of one of my favorite paintings, which I was fortunate enough to see years ago when it was displayed at the National Gallery of Art in Washington:

http://www.thenewgnosis.org/images/Wreck%20of%20Hope%20-%20Sea%20of%20Ice.jpg
http://www.thenewgnosis.org/images/Wreck%20of%20Hope%20-%20Sea%20of%20Ice.jpg

'Wreck of Hope', by Caspar David Friedrich ~ 1774-1840

The colors are soooo much more vivid and blue in the original piece...if anyone can find a better reproduction, I would encourage them to post it here. :)

I for one would definitely like to see those tuts, and I think others would agree. ;)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

Rebeccak
01-22-2006, 03:56 AM
Well, not great, but I figure I need the practice. :)

From this Reference image: (http://pinker.wjh.harvard.edu/photos/cape_cod_II/images/Hopper%20landscape.jpg)

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/landscape_2.jpg

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

Rebeccak
01-22-2006, 05:55 AM
Slight update...

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/landscape_3.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/landscape_4.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/landscape_5.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Color%20and%20the%20Figure/landscape_6.jpg

Mu
01-22-2006, 10:24 AM
So, if someone is interested in a tutorial let me know.

aha ha hahaHa... of course, man!

Rebecca - wonderful approach, looking forward to your next steps!

danielh68
01-22-2006, 04:49 PM
Rebeccak -- "Wreck of Hope" is a great painting. I also like how your landscape is progressing...I'm curious to send the next update:thumbsup:

Mr. Mu -- I will try and put something together sometime today. :)

danielh68
01-22-2006, 10:10 PM
For anybody who's interested, here's a tutorial on my tropical flower.

First, I fill the white canvass with a gradated background of two slightly varying warm pure hue greens. Some may say, "green is cool, isn't it?" Well, it's sort of relative. For instance, all greens are cooler than orange; yet, within the context of just "greens" there are varying degrees of warmness and coolness. Lets look at the Photoshop color window below.

http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/reb/palette.jpg

In a big-picture sense, I've indicated where the warm and cool colors reside along the spectrum. However, lets say a cool red is needed for the shadow side of a red cube, I would then pick from the cooler assortments of reds from the top of the spectrum. If I wish to be really colorful, I may even dip into the lavenders and blues. Hopefully, this makes sense.

Next I sketch in the flower loosely and rearrange the composition a bit from the established photograph. I omit the vine since it was a distraction and add another bulbous plant to the comp. I chose three bulbous plants because I like odd numbers and they work well for creating interesting asymmetrical yet balanced paintings. There's two smaller ones on the left and a big heavy one on the right; as result, there's some harmony and balance established. I also cropped the edge of the big plant, thus making it an odd number -- only one cropped plant in the composition. Just remember, asymmetry and odd numbers = beauty.


http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/reb/demo1.jpg


During the second stage, I apply warm pure hue colors over my sketch except for the cool magenta on the petals. For the "Colorist School of Thought", try to establish form with more reliance on temperature instead of darker values. The image below, although rough, succeeds in portraying form merely by the different applications of temperature. If you were to apply hue/saturation and desaturate it completely, you would discover that there's not an extreme range of values that make-up the composition. In essence, it's all accomplished through various temperature selections.


http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/reb/demo2.jpg

At this stage, I blend the solids a tad with a pressure sensitive brush. Any brush will work, it's good to experiment with a variety of them.


http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/reb/demo3.jpg

Next, I tighten-up the flower and add some texture to various petals. Sometimes I create my own textured brush, often though, I just grab something from Adobe's pre-existing library. As I continue, I add some pure cool blues with the cool magenta areas of the flower. These two colors are then carried into the shadows of the bulbous plants. I add some different blues for variation.


http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/reb/demo4.jpg

I also sample one of the blues and paint in some abstract forms into the background. Once the colors are established, I repeat a lot of them to maintain continuity and harmony in the piece.


http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/reb/demo5.jpg

At this phase, I wanted more pop from the flower so I played with Levels just a bit. This didn't correct everything, so I used a big brush (set to Overlay) and applied a dark rich green to the background.


http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/reb/demo6.jpg

From here, the overall painting is fairly established. This is the fun part because I get to tinker and experiment. I further refine the piece using a multitude of different brushes, both textured and soft. Sometimes it's good to use an airbrush or a textured brush set at very low opacity and, choosing an object color or background color, gently tap around selective edges of the forms letting them dissolve in the atmosphere.


http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/reb/demo7.jpg

After much tinkering, I create a separate layer set to Vivid Light, sample the brightest yellow from the flower, and dab one big fuzzy airbrush stroke over it. I'm happy with the luminous atmospheric glow it exudes and decide to end things from there.


http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/reb/demo8.jpg

Note: As I work, I constantly flatten my work then create a backup layer. I believe one can accomplish a more painterly feel to their work by working only on one layer as opposed to many.

Rebeccak
01-22-2006, 10:19 PM
danielh68,

Great tut! :applause: It's fantastic to see this, thank you! :wavey:

Looking forward to any and all further tutorials you might wish to provide! :bounce:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Mu
01-22-2006, 10:35 PM
Daniel - thanks a lot for this tutorial. I just read through all of it and can say that this is one of those pieces of information you come repeatedly back to and always learn from it.

Thanks!

danielh68
01-23-2006, 03:14 AM
Thanks everyone, much appreciated :)

By the way, I downloaded ArtRage 2 today and, I must say, it's a sweet little app. The oil paints have a very viscous feel to them. The really cool thing, though, is they get dirty just like traditional paints. This can be both a blessing and a curse, I suppose. The blessing is the user can actually mix compliments and achieve a nice range of greys. The curse is potential mud :argh:

Anyhow, here's a doodle I did. It has a lot of color, so I figure this thread is appropriate.

http://www.danielhelzer.com/sketches/sketch95.jpg

Rebeccak
01-23-2006, 09:37 PM
danielh68,

I've tried ArtRage once or twice, and it does have a nice feel to it. :) Seems even people with more advanced programs are a fan of the free / nearly free app. :)

Maybe I should try it...:D

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

Junpei
02-01-2006, 11:41 AM
hi Rebecca! i've been reading your workshops, n can't wait to acctually start participating. =D
i'm still relatively new to 2d graphic art, i've done alot of sketching and traditional b/w art, but i'm afraid i'm terrible at colours. here is a problem i face alot.. i tried making a palet, but i keep diverting away from it and using neighbors etc, my painting is muddy and clashes. but i'm not exactly sure whats wrong with it =/
here is my palet and some rough painting (i know.. not much colour.. but i better start small or i will make a complete fool of myself =P )
http://img54.imageshack.us/img54/2680/26ee.jpg9http://img54.imageshack.us/img54/2680/26ee.jpg
greyscale, it just... works better for me. whats wrong with my colours that seam to make it muddy, is it my blending?
http://img54.imageshack.us/img54/97/36tx.jpg

Rebeccak
02-01-2006, 11:59 AM
Junpei,

You seem to have a really beautiful start! :thumbsup:

You might try checking out this tutorial by Linda here:

Just some thoughts on smooth blending (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=253711)
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=253711

Also, on her website, Linda provides several more excellent tutorials:

http://www.furiae.com/index.php?view=gallery

See in particular the one on "Thoughts on Skintones".

Hope this helps. :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Junpei
02-01-2006, 02:43 PM
thanks!
thanks for the links, those were really helpfull exersises. kudos to linda for writing them =D

i found out i was mottling my colours because i was taking to many resamples and they were mixxing bad O_O,

from the skin tones, i took a look at them and compared there relative locations to the colour weel so i think i have better understanding of how shading/highlighting works with colours, i wasn't bringing out the colours that were there.

i need to practice this more...! i'll post my progress :)

Rebeccak
02-01-2006, 02:54 PM
Junpei,

No problem! Looking forward to seeing your update ~ your start is already really good! :thumbsup:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

danielh68
02-01-2006, 03:36 PM
Junpei,

Nice start. I think you have way too many values established. A portrait painter, on the average, uses five values to define form: shadow, midtone, highlights...then followed by accentuated marks such as bright highlights and darker shadows.

I'm guessing your using a photo reference? Sometimes it's real easy to get into a detailed and analytical mode of painting when using reference. I would suggest posterizing the picture or use Levels to reduce the many shades of grey to just a few. Or, you can just squint your eyes like I do . It really simplifies things greatly.

Another thing, I would never start on a white canvas because it's not a neutral color, it's too bright and may affect your decision-making. After I establish grey tone values, I apply a warm earthy brown wash over the entire canvas...even the character. It works best setting the layer adjustment to Overlay or Color, that way it has a transparent quality.

When this is complete, you already have your midtone color established. In other words, your overall basic skin color. That's leaves you with just two core values to color. Apply some of your cool green lightly in the shadow areas and some basic skin color with more white to the highlight areas. From here, make things pop by adding your accentuated marks.

Only when I've completed this, would I attempt any blending. However, don't blend all over your values, just where values intersect. For example, where 4 bumps up against 3, you would blend that line together. Try to keep blending in moderation, excessive blending will always lead to muddiness.

I hope this helps :)

Rebeccak
02-01-2006, 03:46 PM
danielh68,

Great advice and tips, thanks for those! :thumbsup:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Junpei
02-02-2006, 04:51 AM
woo, some nice advice, wish i could have read that earlier :)

next colour scene, (will continue other one as well) err.. ignore the mottly eyes... i'm getting rid of that lipstick as well... what i found out on this was really u only need 4 colours to paint plain skin, that is shadow highlight and 2 in between - on my palet (the 5 big splotches to the left - bottom is lining and to warm up the colours, left 2 are main skin colours, right 2 are highlights and orange to bring the other colours out both are contrasting to the 'normal tones'to the left) the others are suble complementary and mix colours i put together to 'mix it up', i didn't wait till the proper time cause this is first only a test, n i get really anxious :P


http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/1025/colour49ck.jpg

Junpei
02-02-2006, 06:59 PM
those lips were just bad, because they are important transition between the two sides, and such there is a big difference in lighting i think it's best to keep the lips around teh same levels, or they draw too much attention away from the rest of the composition.
http://img417.imageshack.us/img417/8596/colour51dq.jpg

Rebeccak
02-02-2006, 07:04 PM
Junpei,

This is looking very good! The one thing I would point out at this point is that she seems a bit bright / shiny...you might want to adjust the levels in PS a bit or otherwise adjust the brightness of her face. But this is coming along really nicely! :thumbsup:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Junpei
02-02-2006, 07:38 PM
=D
..i like the conical hats no'n la'... so pretty XP
http://img439.imageshack.us/img439/8118/colour61qo.jpg

Rebeccak
02-02-2006, 08:00 PM
Junpei,

Better! I think next you might try going back in and picking out a few subtle lights, as the layer that's been added has flattened the light side of the face out a bit too uniformly.

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Junpei
02-02-2006, 08:22 PM
wow, small change but quite abit of improvement :P im glad i finnally started participating in one of these workshops XD it really does make a difference to acctually do them... :P
http://img313.imageshack.us/img313/9162/colour73jx.jpg

Rebeccak
02-02-2006, 08:38 PM
Junpei,

Definitely a big difference! Much better now. :wip: I would suggest trying what danielh68 was recommending, which was to fill the background with a soft neutral tone, in the value range of a mid~dark gray, and in whatever hue of your choosing. :) The current whiteness can be detracting from the main focus, which is the face. I think that that small change might make a big difference as well! :thumbsup:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Junpei
02-02-2006, 09:32 PM
thanks! works pretty well, now you can acctually start to see the hat area :P
:arteest:
http://img304.imageshack.us/img304/1333/colour93my.jpg

Rebeccak
02-02-2006, 09:39 PM
Wow! What a difference! :) The entire image is much warmer now...I would try making the hat a warm, light, luminous hue as well. :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

Junpei
02-02-2006, 11:23 PM
i'll definitely try that!
started to fill in the straw, if i dont' take a break and rest my hand it's gonna fall off before i get a chance to work on the other side XP

http://img450.imageshack.us/img450/3378/colour103zl.jpg

Rebeccak
02-03-2006, 12:17 AM
Junpei,

Out of curiosity, which paint package are you using? :)

Junpei
02-03-2006, 12:26 AM
photoshop 7, love it :D i'm fairly new at it (the world of advanced painting programs) but i've been dabling around in mspaint since i got ahold of a computer with win 3.1, i drew 'stars' and walked around town trying to sell b/w printouts for a dollar, i was i think 5-6? XD good times :)

Rebeccak
02-03-2006, 12:29 AM
Lol...:D...so, Junpei, did you want to tell us a little about yourself / background / art training? :) It's always quite interesting to hear. :)

Junpei
02-03-2006, 01:20 AM
well, i've always remember wanting to be a pro artist, i started seriously drawing when i was about 10, but before that i studied drawing perspective and shapes alot cause my mom had a couple books and would go over them with me,

i started doing abunch of sketches and got interested in realism and figure drawing, i got my first job as an artist at like 14 doing portrait work for weddings, i also did private mural for spare change (though i never liked as i'm not really a painter),

first formal classes... i started taking some college art classes at 16, my first teach.. didn't like him.. he was so mean.. and i didn't think he was so great either, he made it clear that because so many poeple thought art were the 'easier' classes, he was going to make it the hardest class u take, along with huge projects and tests, he failed almost everyone and locked someone out of the class on finals for being 5 minutes late! i think i was the only student to get an A, but i did 3 final projects and didn't sleep for 2 days!

it was after this i got into graphic art, and a friend gave me 3do builder, a free 3do editer, and thats how i got into 3d - it was all text based (no mouse control, and no rotatable views or rendering), needless it say it was excutiatingly difficult to even make a vertex let along a polygon, and i would spend entire days making simple objects (but i made and programmed quite a third party units for my favorite real time strategy game with it, it kind of put me off with the complexity, but i started wondering if there was an easier way to do 3d (ie. were you can acctually create and move a vertex in real time with the mouse!), so some friends who told me it was possible reffered me to blender and i found a couple other packages and tried them out and landed with 3ds max.

now i freelance 3d mostly, but as i've discovered i really like business as well, so in my free time i am building an international company for music and language arts (music is my other love)

so now that reduces me to business law and art - which are the highlights of my interests and studies now. :)


other info about me.. if u dare read more...
i play piano, i was pretty good untill i hurt my hands and couldn't play for almost a year, because my teacher, when i started had said i was one of the best potential he had seen as after 1 year i played at a 6 year level, the bigger reason i think was because of money problems he let me study for almost free. i took music theory in college for fun as well.. but as i could never really get back into the piano (my hands are too slow now and out of practice.. and when i was really into piano i started dammaging my hands, because i wasn't a very smart pianist and enjoyed playing rags at 500+ tempo) i preffure to listen mostly. oh, for alittle while i was the pianist in a jazz band, i really like good jazz, expessially pop jazz influenced arists like nakashima mika.

i'm kind of a dreamer hoping to find fame and fortune :P, i moved alot when i was little which i completely enjoyed, though my younger years were spent living in run down places, usually complete with a hole in the ceiling and no lighting (but my dad was really good at fixing them up, and even built a house from scratch, later for fun he built a car from scratch as well! it even runs, though granted no powerstearing or anything, it's built in the shell of an old jeep(like old army type jeep)), i slept on the floor with my brother most of the time, lived in a cabin for a while, and in the attic of another house, i remember my dad chasing a bat out, also we were robbed at home in one of our houses, so i drew monsters all over the walls to scare away bad guys! :D

phew, i talked alot, thats probably way more then anyone would ever want to know about me @_@

Rebeccak
02-03-2006, 01:36 AM
Junpei,

Wow, you have quite an interesting history! Thanks for that, it's fascinating to hear what folks' real lives are like...your musical ability is really impressive, and I'm sorry to hear that you hurt your hands...don't do the same with art, it's also carpal~tunnel area, so if you start to experience pains in your hands / wrists, then definitely take a break. No sense in harming yourself in the name of one's personal interests. :)

It sounds as though you are quite a driven person ~ likely in any of your endeavours you'll do really well. :) Good luck with your music business, and I hope that you enjoy doing it, as that's the most important. :thumbsup:

It must have been tough growing up in different conditions, but I think our personal histories are of course what make us unique, and who we are...as we get older, I think we're more appreciative of both the good and the bad, and generally the tougher the life, the more interesting the stories! :) You have a lot of history to draw on for your artwork, so I would definitely encourage you to use that.

What types of goals do you have with respect to digital art? Both 2D and 3D? Is it to get better (as we all must) technically, or do you want to say something unique? Something we focus on mostly here on the Anatomy Forum is the technical aspect of Drawing and Painting, but at some point, content must be introduced into our work as well. :)

What are your thoughts on where you'd like to go with your own artwork?

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Junpei
02-03-2006, 02:34 AM
what i most want to do is develop my creativity, i see so many inspirational artwork around here that it is helping me 'think in colour', seeing what others can do is not only humbling but a great sense of awareness as well, not only to the technical aspect to art, but it's nice to know whats going on. i look up to alot of artists, and i guess were i want to go ultimately, is on someones elses list of inspirational artists. :)


my curve is wrong! o_O
http://img133.imageshack.us/img133/8357/colour113uq.jpg

Rebeccak
02-03-2006, 03:05 AM
Sounds like a good goal. :)

Keep up the good work...I'm off to do a bit of work of my own. :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Junpei
02-03-2006, 03:12 AM
hehe, thanks.. but don't think you've got out of it yet..! u still need to tell me what made you choose art as a career, i've visited your site but i don't think u mentioned yet or went into detail, im sure were all curious, whats fueling Kimmel :P

Mu
02-03-2006, 08:26 AM
phew, i talked alot, thats probably way more then anyone would ever want to know about me @_@


Hi Junpei - just wanted to say that your story was very interesting! Read and enjoyed every word of it...

Also, your face in the straw hat is coming along very nicely, esp. when you keep in mind how you started out. It has got a very nice gradation of shades and lights on it.

Junpei
02-03-2006, 01:36 PM
thanks Mr. Mu!

fixed up the curves on the hat abit, and brushed in a few more surrounding colours. started on the hair, using alot of blues but particularly i've taken colours from the hat, skin, and other surrounding areas and brushed them into the hair

http://img235.imageshack.us/img235/1567/colour127ef.jpg
oh, a quick note - i've noticed the brightness/contrast seams to be on the high side for my monitor, so u might have to turn the brightness up on ur monitor to see the hair at this point.

Rebeccak
02-03-2006, 03:14 PM
Morning, Junpei, :)

Looking good! As to your question about what's fueling Kimmel :D ~ I think that would be, at this point, the awesome work that I see on this Forum. :) It's fantastic to see so many people participate here. :thumbsup:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Junpei
02-03-2006, 04:52 PM
hiii!
some work on the hair round 2!
http://img442.imageshack.us/img442/543/colour136ow.jpg

just a test for fun and experiement , adjusted the colours abit and painted abit deaper, but to save time i just did small... visualization ^^
http://img442.imageshack.us/img442/332/ava23zj.jpg

Rebeccak
02-03-2006, 07:33 PM
Junpei,

Cool! What are your plans for the hat? :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

Junpei
02-03-2006, 09:49 PM
well, i wanted to show it's traditional nature, no'n la' are made of leaves /bamboo **usually and coated with attar, so i wanted to work in a smoothness, i think i will reuse alot of colours already in the scene, though speficially i think some nice ochre, gold - deep, as well as egshell and cornsilk. as u suggested i also want it to be relatively light in shade to give depth to the lush', bring the focus in, as i want to show the light filtering through and being reflected of the hat. thats the plan for now anyway ^^ , the other option is to have a more synthetic type non la which is more 'high fashion' though, idk, i think it will show cultural beauty of Vie^.t Nam in several senses. i'll try experiementing with it :)

Rebeccak
02-05-2006, 11:48 PM
Junpei,

Sounds good. :) Looking forward to seeing your update.

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Junpei
02-22-2006, 11:57 PM
ah, sorry for such a late response, things got alittle hectic, i've been planning next term etc. only a few more credits to go till graduation (2 more classes for one degree, abit more for the other 2.)
New job as legal assistant (business and real-estate law)
also i think i'm going to have to turn down a vacation to france with my friend, (it's her last vacation before she goes away next summer) oy, i would have loved to see the Louvre Museum. but with a new job i don't think i can go anywere (nor should), and i would need to get the plane tickets by today. :sad:

hmm, i'm still going to be working on this, also some other Viet nam influenced works, seams to be what i'm into at the moment. theres alot of beauty and colour in that style.

Rebeccak
02-23-2006, 01:44 AM
Junpei,

Hiya, :) glad to hear that you're with a new job, and I hope that turns out to be enjoyable for you. :) Sorry to hear about the trip, but hopefully there will be others. ;) How is your art coming? Quite busy, then? :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

Rebeccak
03-01-2006, 09:59 PM
*bump*

***+++***

umbrellasky
04-22-2006, 10:24 PM
wow great thread!

Gosh...so much has changed with the anatomy forum, it's all organised and everything! So cool. Sorry Rebecca I haven't posted in such a long time. I stop by every now and then to check out other peeps work but I have had hardly any time to myself. School is really taking over everything right now hehe.

Well, i'm truly inspired and I am going to organise myself tomorrow so I can make time for this place, I miss it!

Great work everyone! :thumbsup:

Rebeccak
05-07-2006, 06:32 PM
A great Color Tutorial by Sheff:

Color Tutorial (http://www.pixelcolada.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=19&sid=c7b64b6a4f7a62e16ea2532f5dbf8291)

Junpei
06-18-2006, 04:03 AM
Hi Rebecca! Itís been a while! Iíve been painting and brushing up for awhile but havenít really gotten a chance to do anything major yet as Iíve been busy with school and work. I finally got to do something a few days ago though that turned out particularly well, it took 3 days all in all but it kind of keeps with the idea of my last image I posted here so, I think it's a bit of an improvement at least. Next though I want to do a full scale painting, if I can plan a good one, otherwise I feel Iíll still be wasting a lot of time mucking about.

Ok, my progress was slow and terrible, thatís kind of why you will see I got a little discouraged on the third night of working on this and cropped it down to paint in the rest of the details and making it look alright. It ended up looking ok I guess, though there are some things I would like to improve. I had initially planned on painting scenery and more atmospheres. I saved 3 times during painting the dress so this is the only progress I can show, kind of uneven but oh well. I used a photo reference for the dress, thatís here: http://tinypic.com/hvcto2.jpg

anyway, I hope this isn't too off topic, you can move it if it is, also Iím looking for color suggestions and composition, if Iím going to keep on working on it, this was a bit tricky because as you notice with this fabric the color changes so much depending on the angle and folds. In the beginning part of the reason the colors just seamed to not work at all was it was overall really dull, I think the background also contributed to the muddiness of the greens I originally used, and it was too dark and didn't leave enough room for decent lighting maybe? while I was mostly playing around unskillfully in general colors with some detail spots here and there I still havenít gotten down how to bring out highlights in the early stages, I tend to save this for the last moment when it becomes less of a process and more of a lottery were I have to mess around till I get back to were it should have been if I had followed a good process to begin with. Also maybe it was because of my brushes? I used 1 custom brush which was just a slightly modified ps brush and for 95 percent of it I just used the standard Photoshop sphere brush that comes at the top of the list, put it on pressure sensitive opacity of course and kept adjusting the size and hardness. But other then that, I didn't really do anything fancy. Iím really out of practice lol, but I think brushes could have saved me in the middle stages (I know poor excuse); I havenít really "painted" anything in a couple months, so this is kind of a re-learning process as well.

anything in the means of general critique or maybe even a paintover (especially illustrating where I should have taken it at the various steps, would be great. if you want to start from the beginning and do it anybody is welcome I think to try, the model put her photo forward for artists to edit and turn into art. so, just make sure she stays pretty. :)

Also, I was wondering if you could give me some suggestions as too which workshops I should participate in first, there are so many i don't know which ones i should participate in first, so I was wondering if given what you've seen from me so far you could point me to a few of your other workshops that could help me improve, sort of like a lesson plan.

1st step, just removed the background and painted the elbow which was cropped out in the original, re-painted some hair too.

http://www.getasianmusic.com/images/paneledit.jpg
Starting on the dress, well, this is about mid-way actually

http://www.getasianmusic.com/images/1_1.jpg

ew, some horrible lighting changes, don't ask me why I saved it like this, I think it was an accident, anyway, for the final image I spent forever undoing what I messed up in this image. Some more details added as well though

http://www.getasianmusic.com/images/3.jpg
phew, alittle better
http://www.getasianmusic.com/images/previewupdate.jpg
finnally some progress..
spend awhile on this, and got the most done, i think because i could focus better that i only had to worry about a smaller portion of the image at once. this is when it finnally turned around and i think i kind of saved it.
http://www.getasianmusic.com/images/edit6test.jpg
original/finished with final touches.


http://www.getasianmusic.com/images/edit6test3.jpg




http://www.getasianmusic.com/images/edit2test3.jpg

Rebeccak
06-18-2006, 06:18 PM
Hi there Junpei,

Good to see you back! :)

I have to say that I'm a bit confused as to the aim with this piece ~ is this a photo with a new dress painted on top? You mentioned that you had cropped out the background and painted the elbow, but I'm assuming this is a photomanipulation then? :)

Is the dress painted, or partially a photomanip? Sorry, it's hard for me to tell. :) Let me know what your goal is for this piece, and I am happy to try to help.

Regarding Workshops, really the best Workshop to hop into are the Open Figure Drawing Workshops (OFDWs) ~ a new one, OFDW 018 will begin late tonight (probably best to check in the morning for you) in which we will again be working from Master Works.

All OFDWs are linked here:

Open Figure Drawing Workshops with Hong Ly and Rebecca Kimmel (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showpost.php?p=2602753&postcount=3)
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showpost.php?p=2602753&postcount=3

As soon as OFDW 018 launches, I'll add the link to this post. Check the forum tomorrow for OFDW 018, and jump right in! :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Junpei
06-19-2006, 06:20 AM
Hi Rebecca, it's good to be back! hopefully it will stay that way for awhile :)
My goal was trying to get more realistic painting technique, make a cool looking stylized picture where you can't tell whats real or not. Mostly just a learning exersice and something to do for fun :).I figured painting on top of a photo was a good place to start working on texturing, lighting, color and other details that are easier to miss otherwise because it might give a clear way and form(?) to gauge yourself against. The photo is manipulated just by like some small changes, just like the background the hair lighting and color changes to work into the background and the elbow. The dress is painted, but I had to closely referenced texture here and there and I picked my colors directly off the referenced to begin with, though as you can see I decided it looked pretty bad so I started doing something a bit different near the end. once I got to the final couple stages I didnít have to so much and it kind of took off, in the last shot I worked in the original photo and stuff again too help correct some of the lighting I messed up before.

architectus
07-08-2006, 01:23 PM
This is what I have been studying lately, is color theory. I got caught up in you gals conversation hehe, I learned a little about both of ya.

That dress you painted looks remarkable, do you have a bigger picture you can post?

I have been studying the difference between a high contrast color scheme and a low contrast color scheme. For the most part, from what I can tell, the same colors are used by the masters, they mainly differ in richness of the color. Some work with more greys, other with darker true colors and darks.

That is the main colors I see in skin is grey-blue, green-yellow, yellow-orange, pink, skin color tan or peach, purple-grey, purple-black. Color pallet black, white, red, orange, yellow, green, blue. And mixing these together. Linda Berkvist (spelling) has a nice study in her site for skin tones. http://www.furiae.com go to gallery then tutorials.

This thread is cool, I will be reading the links.

So for my color study I did a paint over of Da Vinci's self portrait sketch. I decided to use a medium key color scheme, trying to use greyed out colors. I did not use any photo reference. I only looked at the sketch as I painted over it. I feel this made me have to rely more on color theory and knowledge of lighting, rather than just trying to copy what you see. I think this is better for understanding how color works, I could be wrong though.

I was going for a ruff oil painting look, not realism. I might have added more color to the hair, but I wanted to get that old davinci look, mostly yellows, reds, and green-yellows for the flesh. Although It might look better with mostly dark hair, what do you think?

So here it is, Painter IX, artist oils, one layer.

http://www.manfacedgods.com/davinci.jpg

architectus
07-08-2006, 07:31 PM
Here is a tutorial I threw together for a Jesus painting I did. I is mostly about color theory. I need to fix that davinci one, it is a tad flat.

Here is the link, let me know if it helps anyone. Feel free to post it in another thread if it can be of use.

http://www.manfacedgods.com/images/jesuswip.htm

architectus
07-17-2006, 06:54 AM
Here is two I did to practice color. Angelina Jolie from photo reference, go to yahoo images and search for angelina jolie. I made lots of mistakes, but I am pleased with the skin tone, that is what I was practicing. Sketch was done over the photo to save time, after all I wanted to practice painting.

The second is from feng zhu's tutorial. I used his drawing. I did not want the comic look, so I deleted the line work once I had the colors blocked in and such. I think I pulled it off, making it look like a painting. I also did not like all the colors he used, so I added more reds into the claw, and a few other adjustments, like the ground. Also I did not like the cartoon looking ladies, so I did my own people.

http://manfacedgods.com/forums/angelinajolie.jpg
http://manfacedgods.com/forums/giantcrab.jpg

Junpei
08-19-2006, 04:18 PM
I really like the lighting, it has a good effect and overall I really like the image. No critiques there, but when I scrolled further right, the warrior(?) looked odd too me. I wish the colors would be more vivid and the pose not so exaggerated - it seams off balance to me. Other then that a great painting! My art studies are embarrassed next too those XD.

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