PDA

View Full Version : Job Situation in the CG Industry


Alex K
12-09-2005, 09:40 AM
Hey,
I will be graduating next year, and yet..there is no doubt in my mind that i would like to study Computer Grafiks. But as this is a big decission to make, i was just wondering, what the job situation in the CG Industry actually looks like.
Would be cool if some of you guys could tell me something about it.

thx
Alex

EdHarriss
12-09-2005, 04:53 PM
- The job situation right NOW is great.
- All these companies making 3D movies and loads of places gearing up for XBox and PS3 games.
- What it will be like in a few years is anybodies guess.

lordmachuca
12-09-2005, 05:30 PM
Hey,
I will be graduating next year, and yet..there is no doubt in my mind that i would like to study Computer Grafiks. But as this is a big decission to make, i was just wondering, what the job situation in the CG Industry actually looks like.
Would be cool if some of you guys could tell me something about it.

thx
Alex

You got to really want this man. study hard practice a lot. It will take some sacrifice here and there but it definitley pays off.
What Field in CG are you trying to get into? Video games, Film, animation, modeler?
From what I learned job searching, environment artist in video games is probably the where most positions are available. Character artist is probably the hardest, well not that hard if you have a superb reel.

trianone
12-09-2005, 08:28 PM
Hi There,

I am relatively new to this forum.......:)


How is the games/film industry in Vancouver and Edmonton right now?

ChrisMann
12-09-2005, 08:51 PM
Edmonton has Bioware Corp. A great mid sized company that is growing each year. You have to be quite good to be an artist or animator working there. Once you get in, its a great company to work for.

Vancuver has lots of graduating students entering the market, so you need to be good and have experience to get work right away. But as always your personal experience will vary based on a lot of factors, such as your personality and how good your portfolio is.

MikeRhone
12-09-2005, 08:52 PM
It is as it has always been. Very good, IF you are talented and/or have experience. There is lots of work in Vancouver, but it is over-saturated with entry level artists.

As I said though, it is as it has always been ;)

lordmachuca
12-09-2005, 10:33 PM
a good method to gain experiance if you can't get an internship, is the mod community. Theres always people looking for artist to join their mod.

Experiance is not always key but, does help.

FloydBishop
12-09-2005, 11:49 PM
There is lots of work in Vancouver, but it is over-saturated with entry level artists.

I think that's the case everywhere right now.

trianone
12-10-2005, 04:51 PM
Any suggestions for someone trying to get Bioware's or Relic's attention?:)

EricLyman
12-10-2005, 05:42 PM
- What it will be like in a few years is anybodies guess.
Quoted for agreement. It's a great time to be starting out in this industry. People who are starting school right now may have a harder time, depending on the market. Jeremy Birn wrote some really insightful things in his Siggraph 2005 sum up. Check it out at http://www.3drender.com/jobs/sig05/index.htm

Sagii
12-10-2005, 06:08 PM
.. I hear it changes but if you are good and work hard and play hard then you should be fine :)

MikeRhone
12-10-2005, 06:36 PM
Any suggestions for someone trying to get Bioware's or Relic's attention?:)

Some good companys. You dont just have to be good, you have to be great. Expereince at other studios is a big plus. Maybe try Radical, Next-level, Jarhead, Rockstar, EA as well. Games companies love people who already have games experience. (Just like VFX companies prefer live action experience, animation studios love feature experience ETC...)

The biggest point is, dont give up! It may take a while, and laddering though oher studios until you hit the job you really want. And don't stagnate... be willing to move around! And never... EVER burn your bridges. Especially in Vancouver. We all have goooooood memories :)

EricLyman
12-10-2005, 07:48 PM
And never... EVER burn your bridges.

That's a good point- People who are students or new to the industry usually don't understand how important your connections are. They can be almost as important as your portfolio, sometimes more so.

peter86
12-10-2005, 09:43 PM
Edit: didn't seem to be too interesting what i posted.

eek
12-10-2005, 10:11 PM
I'll but in here.

Any suggestions for someone trying to get Bioware's or Relic's attention?:)

So what do you want to do? Biowares a pretty sweet place to work.:thumbsup: Ive been here around 7-8 weeks. As for experience well all i can say is:

This industry is so small, dont burn your bridges or be an a***hole! it'll come back and bite you!

Be humble, learn from everyone you meet. And never settle for one way.

Fill you head with as much experience as possible, learn everything, different software,tools, study traditional stuff. Basically get a very strong grounding in your chosen field. Being a TA (technical animator) well i tend to study everything!

Network,network,network - this is your key. I got every job except one from contacts and not job openings.

Mikes bang on money, here i am basically in awe with the people i work with.


As for the current trend in games, basically firstly you have to be at a pretty high level. A lot of the big studios i know will only hire film vfx people or real world graduates ie. architects, engineers etc. Criterion in the UK for instance hires ILM'rs. The current portfolio trend is very high zbrush work, high poly work.

I wish you best of luck all starting in this field,

eek

Shaderhacker
12-10-2005, 10:48 PM
- The job situation right NOW is great.
- All these companies making 3D movies and loads of places gearing up for XBox and PS3 games.
- What it will be like in a few years is anybodies guess.

Actually I disagree. I think the job openings overall is slim right now. There aren't nearly enough openings as there could be (or was about 2 years ago). I'm speaking for the really big companies. Then again, I guess it depends on what job you are looking for. Some of the smaller companies are probably looking though.

All in all, I'd say that the industry is a healthy one right now. Jobs are being grabbed up like crazy too.

Just give it your all.

-M

eek
12-10-2005, 11:10 PM
well ive found feature houses hire around spring time and september time.(ie crunch) Games industry mid/end of year.

eek

seadwellar
12-10-2005, 11:42 PM
You got to really want this man. study hard practice a lot. It will take some sacrifice here and there but it definitley pays off.
What Field in CG are you trying to get into? Video games, Film, animation, modeler?
From what I learned job searching, environment artist in video games is probably the where most positions are available. Character artist is probably the hardest, well not that hard if you have a superb reel.

Congrats on the job Los! True. Having a clear view of the direction you want to go into is always a plus in helping you tailor your reel. The key is to not give up. The market is pretty good right now, but there is no replacement for perseverence and hard work.

hiphopcr
12-11-2005, 06:17 AM
My view is that the job market is great, I see at least a few new job postings everyday that I'd go for if I wasn't already employed, and I've even turned down a handful of jobs. The good news is that the longer you're in the industry the easier things become... the first job is the hardest.

Alex K
12-11-2005, 09:29 AM
Hey,
thx for all the replies. I havenīt really decided what i would like to work on in particular yet. But first of all i need to find a good place to study. Which will probably be a lot harder than i thought, because i believe there are not a lot of Universities in Germany, that offer a wide CG education.

Sagii
12-11-2005, 12:38 PM
Hey,
thx for all the replies. I havenīt really decided what i would like to work on in particular yet. But first of all i need to find a good place to study. Which will probably be a lot harder than i thought, because i believe there are not a lot of Universities in Germany, that offer a wide CG education.


Hi dont worry too much about that... go to the best school you can of course because it will make learning faster and easier.. but if you cant find a great school there are SOO many resources and information online that you can learn a lot on your own. My school is not strong in digital art but it gave me a nice foundation as well as the experience of working and learning with my peers. For the real learning I am going to have to do that myself with the online, books, dvds etc tutorials out there. If you do this. be strict with yourself so you dont just let time fly by. best of luck! :D

jeremybirn
12-11-2005, 01:00 PM
thx for all the replies. I havenīt really decided what i would like to work on in particular yet. But first of all i need to find a good place to study. Which will probably be a lot harder than i thought, because i believe there are not a lot of Universities in Germany, that offer a wide CG education.

I am not an expert, but from the places I've visited like the Film Academy (http://www.filmakademie.de/index_html) it seems as if you have some good choices.

Also, a lot of people who study computer graphics find that it is good to attend a general university first, to get a general education in different subjects, before you focus on an art school or computer graphics training.

-jeremy

vrljc
12-11-2005, 05:04 PM
Also, a lot of people who study computer graphics find that it is good to attend a general university first, to get a general education in different subjects, before you focus on an art school or computer graphics training.


I second that, if you can either afford it or want to take the extra time. But I would recommend it. The reason why is because when going to an art school, your field of study is VERY focused on your Major and you might miss out on some general studies. This does not apply to all art schools, but its something to watch out for.

I think getting a broader education in such fields as math, english, and science will ALWAYS help you in the long run of understanding the world and being able to exist in this world. And you never know, it might just loop back and apply directly into your Major studies.

trianone
01-12-2006, 04:39 PM
I am looking to do enviro modelling and/or lighting. I also do character modeling very well, and know zbrush very well. I've used maya and photoshop for 5 years.





Cheers, t_ronin

tevih
01-12-2006, 04:52 PM
I'm sick of these threads and all those similar to it (like the little sticky at the top of the forum...).

Does anybody know where we can get actual statistics?! Are there sites or services (free or inexpensive) where we can find out specific areas of the industry based on location, about salary, demand, etc?!

This has to be available somewhere...

I hate the threads because they don't contain enough information.

EricLyman
01-12-2006, 05:11 PM
I hate the threads because they don't contain enough information.

I think threads like this could be avoided if some links to solid statistics were added to this thread.
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=259791

But really, I've always been against the 'no salaries thread' rule. If the rule has to exist, why not make a sticky salary thread that people can post to instead of one that just tells people not to start threads?

tevih
01-12-2006, 05:26 PM
I think threads like this could be avoided if some links to solid statistics were added to this thread.
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=259791

Exactly what I wanted to say. Anyone know where we can get that?

jeremybirn
01-12-2006, 06:01 PM
Exactly what I wanted to say. Anyone know where we can get that?

It's not as if there's some document that'll answer all your questions, or tell you if you should be getting paid more for your job, and it's being censored from cgtalk. Google all day, you'll find many statistics, but none will tell you what you want. Don't you think it would be posted here if it existed?

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics, and most of the leading websites for finding jobs, will give you some stats on what graphic artists make, but they won't be specific enough. There have been surveys (http://www.mpsc839.org/_Contract/Wage_Survey/WGSV0496.HTM) of wages of unionized employees in LA, but those depended on self-reporting by a tiny and non-representative group of people, and what I see on the web seems 10 years out of date. The bottom line is, if you have a secret fear that some guy down the hall is earning more than you for the same job, you're probably right. But the only way to prove that would be to break into his mailbox.

-jeremy

crick2x9
01-12-2006, 06:09 PM
a lot of people who study computer graphics find that it is good to attend a general university first, to get a general education in different subjects, before you focus on an art school or computer graphics training.

-jeremy

:bounce::applause: I feel a lot better now
about my educational desicion

Thank you, this makes me feel very good.

Christopher J.
01-12-2006, 06:42 PM
Excellent thread (and Ed, great book on how to get a job in CG too!)

I really don't think this field is saturated yet. Just in my limited time researching the field, I think people tend to focus on the two big aspects of the CG arena and base the field off that (games and movies/TV). There's SOOOO many more avenues to go down with CG work that I think if you're dedicated enough you'll find work.

Simon
01-12-2006, 06:59 PM
Quick tip: Make a piece of work and get it into the cg choice gallery. :D even a good quality post in the normal gallery will get you a whole load of attention. You'll be inundated.

I've tried to address some of the problems faced by people finding work on my free site. www.out-surcer.com (http://www.out-surcer.com). *Cough* plug.

CGTalk Moderation
01-12-2006, 06:59 PM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.