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fasth
12-09-2005, 08:13 AM
I'm doing this huge thing here at work, a 4-5 metres wide and 2metres (@ 100 dpi) and for the background I need a sky. Goodlooking, mind you. I haven't got any photo resources of that size, the biggest I've got are some 10-13mpixel photos, of which only half is the sky.
The whole picture is a photo-collage (or montage?)
I could really need some useful ideas as to how to do this.
Could anyone give me some pointers? deadline is in around a week or two, before christmas. Please, I could really go with some help right now :)

Sully
12-09-2005, 08:18 AM
Have you checked out www.1000skies.com (http://www.1000skies.com) there you can get hold of some amazing photographs at some amazingly highresolutions..Thats got to be worth a look..

fasth
12-09-2005, 08:27 AM
I haven't checked that one out , thanks for the tip.
edit: I checked that 1000skies out, and they're too expensive... I need something cheap/free, maybe a technique or something similiar to get the work done?
Thanks for the link nonetheless, could be useful for future projects :thumbsup:


And on another note;
Does anyone think Terragen could render me a good result?

halo
12-09-2005, 10:52 AM
try just enlarging the images....there's not much detail in skies so they are quite flexible with resizing.

fasth
12-09-2005, 11:50 AM
I have enlarged them, but I can't stretch further than about 200%, and that is not enough. And since it's going to be a wallpaper I can't loose too much quality since it's going to be seen from pretty close.

Sully
12-09-2005, 12:17 PM
hmmm, its gonna be tricky to find something really highres for free unless you can take pictures yourself using a tripod or something, turbosquid has got some cheap skies at pretty highresolutions they are only ike ten dollers each or something..

fasth
12-09-2005, 01:46 PM
Sully, yes, I have got both a tripod and an 8mpixel camera, and I have though about doing a panorama, which will get me going. Unfortunately I need some clouds and stuff for that, and this last week hasn't been very good for that, and I can't rely on it. If the weather gets better maybe, but if not... well, then not :)

I'll check out that other link you gave me, and thanks for trying to help out :) obviously I appreciate it a lot.

frog
12-09-2005, 01:47 PM
You need to go somewhere that isn't too built up, like a park, so there aren't any tall buildings in the way, and set your camera to manual exposure and white balance. Hold it in portrait orientation and take about 6 or 7 shots moving the camera each time (leave about a third of the frame as overlap).

I made this pano last week this way, it's just over 6000 pixels wide and very close to your target res - a small upres will get it there with no loss of quality.

http://www.itchy-animation.co.uk/misc/sky-pano-01.jpg

I used Arc Soft Panorama Maker that came free with my camera, but there's plenty of free or cheap software that can make panos (and Photoshop CS2 has Photomerge built-in):

http://www.snapfiles.com/downloadfind.php?st=panoramas&search=Search&action=s

I took this shot hand held - because skies are distant you never get any parallax problems with stitching, so you don't really need a tripod or pano head for them (and being bright there's enough light for high shutter speeds).

For good skies, morning and evening are a good bet, especially if there is some cloud cover.

frog
12-09-2005, 01:56 PM
I see you are in fact an experienced photographer - you should have no problems with any of this. Panorama is defintely the way to go.

fasth
12-09-2005, 03:59 PM
Frog, I have taken some panoramas before, so I know how to go about doing that, and I have a sea nearby, which is even better than a park or etcetra, but the major problem with that is that these last couple of weeks have been very overcast(ed?), and what I need is some kind of clouds and a little bit of "action" in the sky. That's why I'm looking for another way to achieve this, sinec I can't be sure that the weather will get the way I need it before my time runs out.
Thanks for the tips though, I'll definately go for a panorama if the weather gets good enough :thumbsup:

:)

frog
12-09-2005, 04:23 PM
Over a two week period I'm sure you'll get something. Cloudy skies often break up a little before sunset (especially on the coast) and even overcast skies can take on quite spectacular colours towards evening, not necessarily at sunset itself. Like most photography it's mostly a question of being there at the right time.

It just so happens I'm documenting skies for my own work at the moment, so I've been photographing them a lot, whatever the weather. These shots are all from the last 7 days, and the weather in here hasn't been great either - skies are unpredictable, and even apparently poor weather can lead to great skies.

http://www.itchy-animation.co.uk/misc/sunset-clouds10.jpg

http://www.itchy-animation.co.uk/misc/blue-clouds-at-dusk-08.jpg

http://www.itchy-animation.co.uk/misc/backlit-clouds01.jpg

http://www.itchy-animation.co.uk/misc/sunset-clouds02.jpg

Anyway - good luck whichever way you choose to go :)

Roter Baron
12-13-2005, 07:33 PM
Not sure if you have found what you are looking for... ;) Maybe this is something for you:

http://www.kk3d.de (http://www.kk3d.de/) > Game Design > Sky Environments

If desired, I could offer the files in huge resolutions.

- Karsten

aaron111
12-13-2005, 09:52 PM
I've done lots of high res panorams/mosaics of landscapes and I probably have something that would look good at that size. Can you be more specific about what kind of sky you want and the exact dimensions?

kraal
12-14-2005, 05:32 AM
there are free versions of bryce floating around use that ????

fasth
12-14-2005, 09:31 AM
grah, I wrote a long answer to your questions, but I managed to somehow **** it up and loose all the text. So here goes short version.
I managed to clone around a bit and get a useable sky.
It's roughly 20 000x 10 000pixels big.
The sky is there to give perspective along with a little bit of "action", and to look good. Some 'fun' clouds and not just a bland random cloud picture.
Anyway, since I have got something that's at least useable at the moment, this thing is on ice. Thanks for all your help, and I'll contact you if I may IF I have to, k?
Thanks again :thumbsup:

itsallgoode9
01-03-2006, 05:14 AM
as mentioned, I would just take it in sections and piece it together. And also, I would NOT use a digital camera and instead use a traditional and scan in the negative. you can scan the neg at a few thousand DPI (i know mine does up to 12,800 dpi) which should give you more information than a 8 mp digital and definitly less grain. Really, doing it like that all you're limited to is the abilities of your scanner.

halo
01-03-2006, 09:00 AM
as mentioned, I would just take it in sections and piece it together. And also, I would NOT use a digital camera and instead use a traditional and scan in the negative. you can scan the neg at a few thousand DPI (i know mine does up to 12,800 dpi) which should give you more information than a 8 mp digital and definitly less grain. Really, doing it like that all you're limited to is the abilities of your scanner.

does depend on the film stock somewhat....theoretical grain limit of 35mm and 2 & 1/4" is about 5000 dpi...ie anything more and you can pick up the actual grain surface of the film which looks like noise.

a cmos chip camera reduces the noise dramatically over ccd cameras.

spmonahan
01-03-2006, 07:22 PM
And also, I would NOT use a digital camera and instead use a traditional and scan in the negative. you can scan the neg at a few thousand DPI (i know mine does up to 12,800 dpi) which should give you more information than a 8 mp digital and definitly less grain. Really, doing it like that all you're limited to is the abilities of your scanner.

The thing is that most desktop flatbed scanners max out at an optical resolution of 3000~4000dpi. The 12,800 dpi or whatever advertised is interpolated (for instance (http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.asp?Submit=Go&DEPA=0&type=&description=Canon+CanoScan+9950F&Category=0&minPrice=&maxPrice=&Go.x=26&Go.y=35)). In other words it's no different than scanning at 4000dpi and then sampling the image up. Now if you had a drum scanner (http://westcoastimaging.com/wci/page/services/scan/wciscans.htm#Scansizes) and shot medium or large format it would definately be worth scanning.

If you use a modern DSLR and shoot at ISO 100 with a good lens you'll get an excellent image with no grain to speak of. Since you will likely have to stitch a few images together anyhow shooting digital would relieve you of the hassle of scanning a lot of film and the associated issues (dust, scratches, etc).


a cmos chip camera reduces the noise dramatically over ccd cameras.

Current CMOS chips are amazing. I can shoot up ISO 800 on my 20D before I start to even think to worry about noise. Get yourself a copy of Noise Ninja (http://picturecode.com/) and you'll not even bat an eye at shooting 1600.

Captain Jones
01-06-2006, 02:49 PM
neat thread... came across a similar (but less intesive) problem a while back... ended up making a panoramic out of several pictures.

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