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CarcerCityHood
12-06-2005, 08:43 PM
For those in the video game industry, or those trying to be, what exactly are you doing to prepare? I'm currently a junior in high school, and I plan on getting into the business, which is why I'm asking here. Obviously, high school doesn't offer much about video games, if at all, so all I'm doing now is taking all the computer classes that are available. Besides this, what can I do to get into the business, specifically environmental design? I really need help, and I would appreciate and feedback.

Lastly, about colleges, are there any the specifically specialize in video games? Is that wehere you guys are attending? I live in the U.S. by the way. Thanks again!

toebee_1
12-06-2005, 10:07 PM
Mainly I guess that it depends on what you want to do in the industry. From an artist standpoint, I think its best to become as well rounded an artist as possible, from fine art through 3D. Try to master as much as possible, not just sticking to modelling or texturing. You can always excel in one, but I believe you are more desireable to an employer if you have a broader knowledge of 3D.

GradiusCancer
12-06-2005, 10:25 PM
Buy UT2k4 (or equivalent 3d game that's easy to modify) and start building environments. The DVD edition has tutors and everything.

Get a 2d and 3d art package. The industry stanards are Photoshop (2d) and Maya or 3d studio Max (3d). If you can't get your hands on those, here's a link to a thread featuring many free or low cost apps
http://boards.polycount.net/showflat.php?Cat=0&Number=8173&an=0&page=0#8173

Get involved with online communities, CGtalk, Polycount, and CGchat are great for the art side of things, and you can often find technical specifics to games you want to modify. Based on what game you get to try and put art in, join it's online communities. Be friendly, and always accepting of what people say, they usually only want to help. A good attitude will take you places.

Practice, practice, practice! Once you get in the swing of thing, try making a new piece everyday. Art isn't like riding a bike, you've got to keep your skills sharp. All these online communities have art challenges and whatnot to keep you inspired and going.

Meet people, make contacts, and browse people's web sites. Often artists who post here have portfolios in their signature or profile. Those sites commonly have tutorials. Great way to learn, and if you can befriend these artists, they'll usually be more than happy to help you out.

I've heard good things about the Guild Hall.

HellBoy
12-06-2005, 10:51 PM
http://www.igda.org/breakingin/

http://www.igda.org/breakingin/resource_schools.php
this last link is for game schools in the world

What I used to do was and still sometimes do is draw many many 2d map drawing of a level, from top view, how each room would be layed and stuff.
Also visualise alot, and play alot of games to get inspiration of how level and environtment is designed

GradiusCancer idea is great

good luck m8

JuddWack
12-06-2005, 11:05 PM
You mentioned that your HS does have anything in the way of video game design, which I'd imagine isn't uncommon, so your taking all the computer classes you can. That certainly would help but I'd have to suggest taking all the art courses you can instead. You can teach yourself the programs needed on your own time, but learning painting, drawing, sculpting, etc in a classroom dynamic will help out a lot.

SPIDER2544
12-06-2005, 11:29 PM
For those in the video game industry, or those trying to be, what exactly are you doing to prepare? I'm currently a junior in high school, and I plan on getting into the business, which is why I'm asking here. Obviously, high school doesn't offer much about video games, if at all, so all I'm doing now is taking all the computer classes that are available. Besides this, what can I do to get into the business, specifically environmental design? I really need help, and I would appreciate and feedback.

Lastly, about colleges, are there any the specifically specialize in video games? Is that wehere you guys are attending? I live in the U.S. by the way. Thanks again!

it wouldnt be such a bad idea, to start taking art classes at a comunity college, ive known quite a few kids around your age who were able to get into various programs at the comunity college i went to. youll also be able to study 3d programs, and photoshop stuff like that at a comunity college, cause most highschools dont have the funding for stuff like that

if you do that youll get a head start on the game, for building a portfolio to get into an art school. also study as much fine art as you can, grab books on artists, old masters, modern abstract work, photography, and hang out on CG talk and the web looking at all the stuff thats going on in the industry.

eventualy when you get some cash in highschool, pick up a copy of photoshop, and if you can grab a 3d app and study your butt off.

Athey
12-07-2005, 12:36 AM
You're gonna hear the same thing over and over- art classes.

Believe it or not, the ability to draw properly in 2-dimentions can really help you getting better with the 3D stuff.

Painting (digital or traditional) is also a good thing to practice, since it'll help you get a better grasp of color theory and that'll help a lot with texture creation. Digital painting is a very good skill to learn, since it'll transfer over to painting textures as well.

Mastahful
12-07-2005, 09:37 AM
Everything has pretty much been said, but also if you want to work on environments, graphic design and architecture are worth a look....there are various courses out there but non of them provide you with a 'golden ticket' into the industry.....you need to work hard on your own time and develop as many relevant skills as you can.

Augh
12-07-2005, 09:40 AM
Yet another vote for getting a head start on 2d draftsmanship and painting skills here. You can learn model theory and practises a lot quicker with the right setup, but nothing really beats a history of 2d experience.

Cheers, good luck :thumbsup:

CarcerCityHood
12-07-2005, 04:19 PM
Thanks a lot for your replies! I understood most of what you guys were saying, but as I'm as much of a newbie as I can get with this stuff, I was kind of lost when you guys mentioned programs and what would be helpful to study.

On the art suggestions, I have taken basic art in middle school, where you learn different perspectives and such, but nothing to the extent you guys are suggesting.

Question: Some of you said to go to a community college and study on art before anything, while others say to just go to a video game college where they teach you everything, so which do I do? Should I do as much as I can with programs and art, and then go to a college for video games when I graduate? Or, should I just go to an art college when I graduate and hold off on games for a year or two? What do you recommend?

Thanks so far guys!

HellBoy
12-07-2005, 06:49 PM
I recommand that you should see both of the schools, go for an interview or open days, get information on both colleges, see which satisfy you

be careful though, some game courses tent to teach you everything that involves in the game, thats the art side, programming bit, all the bits that is involved.
there are game courses that is specially design for one area of the development. I also say if you are dead serious to be a game artist then go to game college.

if you are planning to be a character artist then its slightly important to study the actual art and learn some figure work (how to draw people) because I believe a character artist involves alot of 2d work, I also heard larger companies tent to have 2d and 3d artist therefore, 3d artist don't worry about 2d.

Augh
12-07-2005, 07:13 PM
Dunno about from a professional point of view, but having largely ditched 2d art almost a decade ago, and picked up 3d art within the last 2 years, I'm kicking myself daily that I now can't texture my models the way I want, and suspect could do if I had kept a sketchbook/paintbrush/insert applicable tool here handy all that time. While I'm no real authority on the matter, I'd say there's very little if anything that can be hurt by getting as much artistic experience and capability as possible in any and all areas that come your way, or are out there to be found and practised/enjoyed.

Definitely it should go without saying that if you're gonna go far, you'll be doing something artistic whenever you can, simply for the sheer enjoyment of it, or because you just do without thinking about it, rather than because you "have to". At least imo.

Short version; there's no real substitute for long term art experience, whether you need to apply it in day to day work to get the job done or not.

Cheers :thumbsup:

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