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RobertoOrtiz
11-17-2005, 08:37 PM
Quote:
"Nick Negroponte would like to sell you a $100 laptop, especially if you're head of state in a large developing country.

That's why he is at the World Summit on the Information Society, the giant UN-sponsored gathering that starts Wednesday in Tunis. Negroponte plans to show for the first time a working prototype of his new device, intended for hundreds of millions of mostly-poor students worldwide. The techies and government ministers in Tunis are his ideal target market. "

>>LINK<< (http://money.cnn.com/2005/11/16/technology/laptop_fortune/index.htm)
-R

Chris Bacon
11-17-2005, 08:41 PM
That is AMAZING and the fact its powered by a crank being turned....AMAZING

DrFx
11-17-2005, 08:46 PM
Brilliant! :eek: Even if, like the AMD CEO says, the infrastructure to support them will take two years to put in place, two years is a very short time!

cookepuss
11-17-2005, 08:49 PM
Imagine the poor kid who lost his power cord, but has to still pull an all nighter to finish a term paper. :scream: Crank. Crank. OUCH! Crank. Crank. OUCH! Daddy, are we poor? :)

dbates
11-17-2005, 09:31 PM
I would definitely like one of those. . . just think, the digital Legal Pad.

unchikun
11-17-2005, 10:19 PM
That is AMAZING and the fact its powered by a crank being turned....AMAZING

I had one of those crank radios and it takes a hundred or so cranks just to listen a few minutes. Can't imagine how many cranks it would take to power up a laptop.

BillB
11-17-2005, 10:57 PM
How can they claim it's the Worlds First $100 Laptop - when they can't make it for that yet, and won't be able to (if they can) for two years?

When I can go buy it for $100, then they can start blowing trumpets.

Cool though. Colour screen even!

Array
11-17-2005, 11:08 PM
I think that its ridiculous that they turned down Steve Jobs' offer of free OSX to run these things, in lieu of using Redhat. Thumbs down from me.

asparapani
11-17-2005, 11:17 PM
I think that its ridiculous that they turned down Steve Jobs' offer of free OSX to run these things, in lieu of using Redhat. Thumbs down from me.

I think it's a great machine that will inpower hundreds of millions of people. I've been following the news of this 100$ laptop for quite some time now. It's been blogged a million times with all great reviews and support. I would definatley buy one.

In defense to the quote above, I support the companies rejection of OSX. Not because it's Apple because I love their products, but because it's closed source. The company that created the 100$ laptop does not want to implement that type of culture into their product.

Hazdaz
11-17-2005, 11:48 PM
Technologically speaking that is pretty damn cool...

BUT I am goign to be the 'devil's advocate' for a second here...

$100 is a LOT of money for people in the 3rd world. I really think that spending a fraction of that amount of money on better schooling would go lots father than putting all your eggs in one basket with this $100 laptop. 10 or 20 years ago even people in the US didn't have laptops and computers in every school, but somehow we still learned to read and write and count (ok, fine, the US had shitty public schools, but still).

I think teaching these people in 3rd world countries the fundamentals is a lot more important than teaching them how to AIM people and download p0rn or any other 'hi-tech' thing that they can do with this device.

Array
11-18-2005, 12:21 AM
In defense to the quote above, I support the companies rejection of OSX. Not because it's Apple because I love their products, but because it's closed source. The company that created the 100$ laptop does not want to implement that type of culture into their product.

Sure the OS is closed source, but I doubt that matters to the people who will ultimately be using these laptops. For them, accessibility means everything. A lof of the people who will be using these wont even be literate, let alone computer saavy enough to tweak their own OS. These things need to be as easy as possible to use, and desktops like KDE arent anywhere close to trumping OSX's offering in terms of usability.

mental
11-18-2005, 01:06 AM
Sure the OS is closed source, but I doubt that matters to the people who will ultimately be using these laptops.
The choice to go with Linux is more for the benefit of the developers than the users. With Linux they can strip the OS down to the barebones to meet their very specific performance requirements. Take Damn Small Linux (http://www.damnsmalllinux.org/) for example which occupies just 50mb of HD space and can run on as little as a 486 processor with 16mb of ram. Apple would just be another cook in a crowded kitchen.

What does DSL have? XMMS (MP3, CD Music, and MPEG), FTP client, Dillo web browser, links web browser, FireFox, spreadsheet, Sylpheed email, spellcheck (US English), a word-processor (FLwriter), three editors (Beaver, Vim, and Nano [Pico clone]), graphics editing and viewing (Xpaint, and xzgv), Xpdf (PDF Viewer), emelFM (file manager), Naim (AIM, ICQ, IRC), VNCviwer, Rdesktop, SSH/SCP server and client, DHCP client, PPP, PPPoE (ADSL), a web server, calculator, generic and GhostScript printer support, NFS, Fluxbox window manager, games, system monitoring apps, a host of command line tools, USB support, and pcmcia support, some wireless support.

BillB
11-18-2005, 01:20 AM
$100 is a LOT of money for people in the 3rd world. This was bound to come up sooner or later. This is NOT intended for the third world. They need clean water and food, not a laptop. That'd be just dumb. It's for countries like Tunis, Brazil and Argentina who have schools, but little else in some cases in terms of student resources. Second tier nations.

Love to see what happens after 4-6 months of heavy use when the flash memory starts failing :)

AirbORn
11-18-2005, 01:41 PM
I had one of those crank radios and it takes a hundred or so cranks just to listen a few minutes. Can't imagine how many cranks it would take to power up a laptop.

It states the laptop can run for a solid 10min for every 1 min of crank turning. Not too bad I think.

I though it was a little goofy at first but now that I think of it, the idea makes perfect sense. I hope they can pull it off and that other companies chip in.

csven
11-18-2005, 10:02 PM
For anyone who hasn't been following some recent, rather low-level online commentary, you might want to read some blog entries by a person attending the conference. As an industrial designer, no way does what was shown amount to a "prototype", and some of the other issues raised in these entries have me wondering how much of this is smoke and mirrors and how much is for real. Here are links to the blog entries:

Problems with the $100 laptop - http://fonly.typepad.com/fonlyblog/2005/11/problems_with_t.html
Some movement on the OLPC - http://fonly.typepad.com/fonlyblog/2005/11/some_movement_o.html
Alan Kay comes through - http://fonly.typepad.com/fonlyblog/2005/11/alan_kay_comes_.html

From the second entry:


A day or so after my post on "Problems with the $100 laptop" an interesting event happened. I'm posting from the World Summit on Information Technology, where OLPC is introducing the laptop. They have a balsa model with a keyboard and an LCD with a thick cable attached to a box under the counter, and Mary Lou Jeppsen, the LCD designer and the chief engineer right now, makes no bones about it not being ready yet. They seem to have added a crank about 6 inches long, made of flat balsa wood pieces. I have been told that they now claim that the crank will have a 3:1 (instead of 100:1) ratio of crank time to running time. That's much more reasonable from a power calculation standpoint, but not appetizing for users who plan to leave their laptops on 24hrs/day (for mesh networking support). So I went searching for the original statement to show a friend. No dice. The only place you'll find it is in the post in this blog. In fact, there's no mention on the Media Lab web page http://laptop.media.mit.edu (http://laptop.media.mit.edu/) of power generation at all!


The crank ratio has come up quite a bit in my reading. I'm unsure if that 100:1 ratio was used as the basis for the recent claims, but right now - given how this is being called a "prototype" as if it had working internals - I'm doubtful.

FYI: the last blog entry is really concerned about the approach being taken on the entire program, so it's "big picture" stuff. People who are really interested in this project might find it interesting. I did.

angel
11-21-2005, 02:25 AM
the crank is all fine and dandy until they loose track of time while browsing porn and casino sites... damn it, forgot to crank it!



relax j/k

arquebus
11-21-2005, 04:19 AM
I think that its ridiculous that they turned down Steve Jobs' offer of free OSX to run these things, in lieu of using Redhat. Thumbs down from me.
Yeah, why would kids in developing nations want to use free linux apps when they can go out and buy Mac software.

*and on a serious note*
I want to mention that this idea is already being done in India, they have whats called the Simputer which is a PDA that runs embedded linux and uses interfaces that illiterate people can understand.

Hazdaz
11-21-2005, 11:18 AM
I want to mention that this idea is already being done in India, they have whats called the Simputer which is a PDA that runs embedded linux and uses interfaces that illiterate people can understand.

See.. I think right there is the problem with all these devices. How about teaching the person to read, instead of dumbing-down the interface cuz they can't read?!?

Technology is great, but sometimes good old paper and pencil - which is still BY FAR CHEAPER - is better than these high-tech gadgets. How many people out there bought a PDA for $200+ and then in a few months it is sitting on the corner of your desk collecting dust, because scribbling somethign on a $1 notepad is so much easier and cheaper.

Apoclypse
11-21-2005, 12:59 PM
Damn skippy, get these mofos so paper yo. On a serious note I also agree that technology is not always the answer. Teaching the basics should be more important. However for kids in school something like this would be great. That whole crank thing sounds suspicious though. I think they should have went with Ubuntu not redhat, but I gues ubuntu is not ready yet. Though by the next release we should be seeing soemthing pretty special (i hope).

arquebus
11-21-2005, 02:33 PM
See.. I think right there is the problem with all these devices. How about teaching the person to read, instead of dumbing-down the interface cuz they can't read?!?

Technology is great, but sometimes good old paper and pencil - which is still BY FAR CHEAPER - is better than these high-tech gadgets. How many people out there bought a PDA for $200+ and then in a few months it is sitting on the corner of your desk collecting dust, because scribbling somethign on a $1 notepad is so much easier and cheaper.
Lets be honest, there are millions of subsistance farmers in India who will never see a life beyond farming and menial labor because no matter how much the Indian economy develops, it will never be able to provide jobs for all their exploding population. Industrialized nations have been lending and donating billions of dollars of aid to African countrys with the hopes that it would be used to build economic and social infrastucture and it has only made things worse not better. Sending computers might really be the only way to break through this cycle of hoplessness and ignorance. And that is the root cause of world poverty is ignorance, people who would rather scrape by an existance in subsistance farming because they have no confidence in any kind of economic system to provide for them. These computers might be the only way to reach people through the mind and not the stomach.

Apocolype- Why dont you think Ubuntu isnt ready yet?

sandrum
11-21-2005, 02:42 PM
The dynamo and crank idea has got to be seriously efficient or those users will be cranking like no tomorrow. The kids where I live put together these little pain in the ass dynamo/generator hand crank flashlight kits that you have to crank forever to get any power out of. I could see some repetative stress injuries coming from too much crankin.

sumpm1
11-22-2005, 03:49 AM
I am not so sure that they have a working prototype yet. The type of screen that they propose to use is still in the works, and that is for black and white, they only assumed that it could someday be done in color. The picture of the prototype on CNN.com is a dummy model to show one possible design.

I suggest that they choose a drawstring generator, like a doll. It could be adjusted to differnt strengths to require less pulls.

Jozvex
11-22-2005, 04:37 AM
See.. I think right there is the problem with all these devices. How about teaching the person to read, instead of dumbing-down the interface cuz they can't read?!?

While I totally agree with you, why couldn't they put educational software on the laptop that teaches you how to read! I think $100 per family on a laptop may be cheaper than building schools and finding/hiring teachers who can do the same job for the same number of people?

Just an idea anyway.

:)

Grim Beefer
11-22-2005, 10:09 AM
This reminds me of the Peace Corps, going to poor countries to teach them how to farm and fish, etc., when what they really need are access to the resources that have been stolen from them in the first place. I think that imperialist economic practices are behind this more than anything. Just like the farmer getting agri-buisness technology shacled to their ankle, this attempt to "modernize" nations is more about obediance and reliance. I totally agree, as stated previously, that it's the economic foundations that undermine educational systems. If these laptops help to educate those that can afford them, it's likely that the best and brightest from the countries that need them most will just emmigrate to the West - where their education will certainly be more lucrative. This is already a problem in places like Haiti, where they can't keep doctors after educating them because they all leave to work in the U.S.

arquebus
11-22-2005, 03:10 PM
While I totally agree with you, why couldn't they put educational software on the laptop that teaches you how to read! I think $100 per family on a laptop may be cheaper than building schools and finding/hiring teachers who can do the same job for the same number of people?

Just an idea anyway.

:)
Since this laptop is supposed to run Linux OS Ill bet some kids will download open source apps like Blender, Gimp and Wings3D and figure out how to use it. Who knows, some kid living in the African Bush may someday upload his/her 3D art to cgtalk from that little laptop.

Schwinnz
11-22-2005, 03:53 PM
And Gates would like Negroponte to use Microsoft software rather than the free open-source alternatives that Negroponte currently favors.

Wow, talk about a...

dbates
11-22-2005, 05:33 PM
Since this laptop is supposed to run Linux OS Ill bet some kids will download open source apps like Blender, Gimp and Wings3D and figure out how to use it. Who knows, some kid living in the African Bush may someday upload his/her 3D art to cgtalk from that little laptop.

On a 500MHz laptop? Those programs are going to stress the system. . . Granted, Blender and Wings aren't Maya or Max, but still--this laptop isn't state of the (performance) art.

BillB
11-22-2005, 11:49 PM
On a 500MHz laptop? Those programs are going to stress the system. . . Granted, Blender and Wings aren't Maya or Max, but still--this laptop isn't state of the (performance) art. We did a TV series at 700 to 800Mhz, and I started out doing commercial work at about 16Mhz. So don't laugh too hard at the suggestion, or be too surprised when it happens!

Hazdaz
12-09-2005, 06:31 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20051209/tc_nm/technology_intel_dc

Seems that Intel doesn't think these $100 laptops are such a good idea.

I agree, but not for the same reasons that Intel does. Are they possibly a little scared??

LetterRip
12-09-2005, 08:34 PM
On a 500MHz laptop? Those programs are going to stress the system. . . Granted, Blender and Wings aren't Maya or Max, but still--this laptop isn't state of the (performance) art.

When I wrote 'sculpt mesh' (a sculpting plugin for Blender) i got some feedback about difficulties with it being slow. I was rather perplexed since given the mesh size it was blazingly fast on my computer.

Turns out that these individuals had 700Mhz computers. Only slightly better specs than the above. The processor isn't near as much a problem as lack of ram (128 mb combined for system and video it looks like... Blender would still be usable but it would put a major constraint on scene size) and the near complete lack of storage capacity - so all renders and work would need additional local storage or somehow use network storage.

Those can both be overcome potentially, basically we could have say a 200$ computer as a mainframe for storage and occassional offloading of more processor or memory intensive tasks.

LetterRip

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