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View Full Version : Initiative to certify downloadable software by Google & Yahoo


RobertoOrtiz
11-16-2005, 03:05 PM
Quote:
"An anti-spyware initiative backed by Internet portals Yahoo and AOL would certify downloadable software as consumer-friendly and non-invasive.

Under the program, which was to be formally announced Wednesday, developers that want to obtain certification for their downloads would also have to prove their products can be easily removed from computers once installed"

>>link<< (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20051116/ap_on_hi_te/trusted_downloads;_ylt=AnHfYOIJ9Y2AgO6rn2zG41is0NUE;_ylu=X3oDMTA3cjE0b2MwBHNlYwM3Mzg)

-R
PS Who watches the watchers?

pgp_protector
11-16-2005, 06:23 PM
Ok, how many would trust somthing "Certified" by AOL ?

Golloween
11-17-2005, 09:10 AM
It's not AOL, it's TRUSTe:

"TRUSTe, an organization that already certifies and monitors Web site privacy and e-mail practices for businesses, will rely on testing by two outside labs for the vetting."

phexitol
11-17-2005, 10:53 AM
...

"TRUSTe, an organization that already certifies and monitors Web site privacy and e-mail practices for businesses, will rely on testing by two outside labs for the vetting."

Hopefully the two outside labs will help to reconcile TRUSTe's certification problems. Ben Edelman (http://www.benedelman.org/spyware/ns8/), in his rundown of Netscape 8/TRUSTe's certification process in June 2005, had this to say:

"TRUSTe issues certificates merely on the basis (http://www.truste.com/consumers/web_privacy_seal.php) of sites posting a web site privacy policy and agreeing to mediate disputes in a particular way. TRUSTe lacks serious enforcement procedures, and TRUSTe stands willing to certify a web site on the basis of its web site practices, even if the site serves primarily as a conduit for software (perhaps "spyware" or "adware") with practices inconsistent with the web site's privacy policy. So TRUSTe-certified sites may not be as trustworthy as the label suggests."

wuensch
11-17-2005, 11:08 AM
What is a certificate of that kind worth?
Who will be held responsible if the certified software turns evil?

"Easy to remove"-- how many programs you know can be unzipped an started right away?
Everything that uses Microsoft installation process is *NOT* easy to remove.

Reminds me of Microsofts certificate for drivers (whenever you install a new Graphicsdriver, "this driver is not certified" pops up because its --new.Certified drivers are usaually outdated for several months.

And a certificate would only create a dangerous appearance of security that simply is not there with software on the net--- and it would delay the publishing of new software-updates (or --see Microsoft certified drivers).

Olli

Dennik
11-17-2005, 01:50 PM
Yeah, like no one can fake an electronic certificate :rolleyes:

ThomasMahler
11-17-2005, 02:26 PM
Slightly off-topic, but on a side-note:

http://www.identity20.com/media/OSCON2005/

jeremybirn
11-17-2005, 04:11 PM
An optional "Seal of approval" type program won't solve all problems, but it could be a useful step. Especially if, in addition to being displayed for potential users, that list is used to screen who gets paid for running ads for participating companies. It's good for the big advertisiers to have standards, so they would pay legit web developers are legit adware programs for the ads they display, but not the malware developers.

-jeremy

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