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View Full Version : TUTORIAL - Turpenoid PrismaColor Technique - by Sheff


PixelColada
09-23-2005, 11:28 PM
Hi Guys,

I thought I'd post this demo as it's very easy and most of you probably already have the materials on hand.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/normal_TurpDemo_00.jpg

One of the things I see students struggling with is making a transition from drawing in line to drawing with form. Line is one of those things that people tend to cling to much longer than necessary.

Here is the deal, in order to improve or learn something new, you want to take something that you are already good at, or confident with, such as your drawing skill and make it easy to turn line into value. That way you can rely more on shape than you do line.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/normal_TurpDemo_01.jpg

Basically take a kleenex with a couple of drops of turpenoid and use it to smear the stroke of prisma pencil. You are now turning a line into value/shape. I forgot who said it but it was an excellent example, when you look at a yearbook with all the groups of people with faces smaller than your smallest fingernail, you can still recognize who the person is because of the shapes of light and shadow on their faces. Shape can communicate more than line and this is an important thing to realize when you move into paint.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/normal_TurpDemo_02.jpg

This was a demo that I did for my illustration students. Aside from the technique, a photocopier was utilized.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/normal_TurpDemo_03.png

Here is the original image. It's kind of beat up as it has seen a lot of travel back and forth from my house to the school. It's prisma on 11 x 17 vellum. The important thing is that I am ONLY using line.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/normal_TurpDemo_04.png

This is a photocopy of my line drawing. The advantage of using the photocopier is that my lines are fused to the paper. Put the original line drawing in the machine and put a sheet of the same vellum in the bypass tray. The machine then copied my drawing onto the fresh sheet of vellum. This serves two purposes; 1) it makes your lines permanent and 2) if you screw up while applying value, you can still make another photocopy of your original drawing and start again. If you were working on your original and had to start over, you would have more work having to redraw your image and more likely than not it wouldn't have the same degree of 'freshness'. Often times when you project or trace a drawing to put it onto an opaque surface, you tend to lose some of the spontanaety of the original drawing. By using a copier, you keep the freshness and the copy acts as a safety net, enabling you to be more daring than you would otherwise be if you were working on your original.

This image is made by applying your black prisma pencil to make your shadows and using the kleenex with turpenoid to blend out your lines. That way they read as shapes of value. The light areas are made with a kneaded eraser. Electric erasers will also work with this technique, but I save that for highlights in the hair and eyes.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/normal_TurpDemo_05.png

Now this is another copy put onto a fresh sheet of vellum. This time, I copied the value drawing above. Now my values are established and not moving, I now use only the colored prismas and leave out black. I don't need it as now the toner from the copier is my black and it's not moving.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/TurpDemo_06.png

Here another class demo where the same idea about is line, except this time I am tracing reference from National Geographic.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/TurpDemo_07.png

The advantage is you can use the copier to increase or decrease the size of your line drawing before you apply value.

PixelColada
09-23-2005, 11:34 PM
http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/normal_TurpDemo_08.png

As long as you are confident in your drawing skill you can see that it doesn't take much to make something start to take shape very quickly. You can use this technique for drawing from life.



http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/TurpDemo_09.png

You can use different colors.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/normal_TurpDemo_10.png

You can work very smooth.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/normal_TurpDemo_11.png

Or you can work with more turpenoid to get more of a 'brushtrokey' kind of feel.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/TurpDemo_12.png

Here a student left me with a very soggy kleenex wet with my turpenoid. I didn't want to waste the turp so I drew the model. The more turpenoid you have in the kleenex, the harder it is to control and the less smooth/rendered the results will be.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/TurpDemo_13.png

If you over wet the kleenex, adjust your drawing style to suit the medium.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/normal_TurpDemo_14.png

Different types of vellum will yield different results. This is done on stationery store vellum, like the kind in a wedding invitation.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/TurpDemo_15.png

You can also mix colors by holding more than one pencil at a time to put down your initial values.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/TurpDemo_16.png

You can also draw very small from life and blow up your drawing to apply color.

http://sheffieldabella.com/gallery/albums/tutorials/normal_TurpDemo_17.png

You can do pretty much anything you want with this technique.

Rebeccak
09-23-2005, 11:35 PM
Sheff,

Awesome tutorial here! Thanks so much for doing this, and so quickly! I have never seen this technique done in quite this way, and it looks like an excellent way to transition from line to form. Great stuff, and very informative! :thumbsup:

Cheers! :)

~Rebeccak

PixelColada
09-24-2005, 01:16 AM
I've had a couple of people show me this and variations that they use. Probably the most well known guy who does this is Sergio Martinez. There was an old article in Step-By-Step about his technique.

I met someone who does the same thing with prisma except he uses Simple Green instead of turpenoid and draws on duralene. He also uses a color copier instead of a straight black and white copier. Unfortunately, I can't remember his name.

paperclip
09-24-2005, 03:02 AM
Fantastic tutorial, must try this out!

One question:

1) What does using vellum/prismacolor brand do for the picture? What are the benefits, as opposed to, say, regular photocopy paper and faber castell colored pencils?

I really like this.....

rongen
09-24-2005, 04:17 AM
Nice tutorial :) I do charcoal paintings and this is my first time saw this product and technique. Thanks for sharing.

PixelColada
09-24-2005, 07:17 AM
Vellum stands up to the constant rubbing on the paper and maintains enough tooth to still grab the pencil. It also enables the turpenoid to evaporate easily. I would venture to guess that the high cotton content of the paper keeps liquids from affecting it too much. I like the tooth and the feel of the paper. The tactile feedback when the pencil goes over it is more satisfying at least to me than doing this technique on tracing paper. Think about when you wash your pants with a dollar in the pocket and a receipt in the other pocket. By the time it gets through the dryer, the money will have held together better than the receipt. It's the fibers. Money is more like cloth than it is like paper. Same for vellum.

If Faber Castell pencils are wax or petroleum based then the turpenoid will dissolve it and the technique should work. If the binder holding the pigment together is something activated by water, like a watercolor pencil, then maybe the it won't work as well.

Any solvent that will break down oil or wax should work, but it just depends on what you like working with. Different solvents will behave differently.

If you have the stuff try it and see. Good Luck!

paperclip
09-24-2005, 01:55 PM
Thanks for the reply, nice explanation.
cheers,
theresa.

pushav
09-24-2005, 04:59 PM
Thanks for sharing that tutorials. I have seen people get the same results with graphite power mixed with various liquids and paint the mono tones with a brush. I should try your method one day when ever I buy a bristol pad.

electricsketchbook
09-24-2005, 08:49 PM
Hey Sheff,

Nice Tutorial buddy, it's too bad everyone can't see it in action, it is more impressive when you watch it done and see how fast the technique really is. Talk to you soon :thumbsup:

pushav
09-25-2005, 01:07 AM
I have a question. Can you use a normal number 2 wooden pencil instead of prismacolor?

PixelColada
09-25-2005, 03:36 AM
Kyle - Yeah, you have to see it in person to undertand how fast it is. I also like how it can echo an older drawing look. One thing I forgot to add that is vital to the technique is an electric pencil sharpener.

Pushav - I don't know about a wooden pencil. If you want to smear graphite and make it smooth, use a woman's make up applicator, like the kind in a compact used to apply foundation. Then you can use your kneaded eraser to model form. You want to do this on a textured surface that has enough tooth. I don't think it will work with turpenoid as the graphite binder is not petroleum based.

I have seen people do this with powdered graphite and a solvent, but I can't remember what the solvent was. I want to say benzene, but I'm pretty sure that's not right and benzene is really really bad for you (nerve damage bad).

~~~

Rebecca's WARNING:

PLEASE NEVER NEVER NEVER USE ANYTHING WITH BENZENE!!!


Benzene is HIGHLY HIGHLY TOXIC and should never be used really...with a ventilator's mask if absolutely necessary (which it shouldn't be if you're not a construction worker).

Sorry, Sheff, I just had to interject that...thanks. :)

~~~

For example if you want to do this with markers or marker ink, you use rubbing alcohol, but you make your lights opaquely with colored pencil rather than erasing back to the white of the paper.

But I like the cheap wooden yellow #2 pencils as well. I like getting them in bulk.

paperclip - glad to help!

Good Luck,

Rebeccak
09-25-2005, 04:10 AM
Sheff,

Someone's work who you should see is magic man's ~ he does excellent work in Prismacolor:

Siren' Slumber (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=267354)

Transition of life and death. (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=265482)

Gladiator (Speedpaint artwork) (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=216654)


Alien Speeder (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=265645&highlight=magic+man)

Bone Studies (He has a strange title which I won't repeat). (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=272285)

The little dancer, speed paint. (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=268079)

Where has my skin gone? (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=269703)

Death Dealer (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=268307)

The Benevolent Demons Report to jesus that he is a drunky. (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=272714)

The Wizard Takes a Pee Over the Railing. (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=269743)


Master Study, Michaelangelo's Libyan Sibyl - graphite + prismacolor process. (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=273193&highlight=magic+man)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

PixelColada
09-25-2005, 06:36 AM
Hi Rebecca,

That's some nice work!

Rebeccak
09-25-2005, 06:39 AM
Sheff,

I agree! Magic man may have heckled me in the past, ROFL, but I'll still pimp his threads! :scream:
Nah, he's a great guy, lots of drive and initiative...and, I think he's like 12, lol. Just kidding, mm...nah, early twenties, I think. It just bothers me that there are people who were born in the '80s, lol...:rolleyes: :D :scream:

I think he would really admire your work a lot...and could learn a lot from your technique. It's why I pointed out his work to you. Maybe you two can discuss some techniques here. :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

ceresz
09-25-2005, 08:45 PM
Sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeetttttttttttttttt tutorial PixelColada, I have to try this sometime.

pushav
09-25-2005, 08:55 PM
Oh well. It looks like i am walinking 4 blocks to my local craft store and getting some prima color pencils and some turpenion or odorless substitute.

It is nice to buy wooden pencils in bulk. 2 dollars can get you a lot of them. Lol.

PixelColada-Some people use acetone and ground graphiite or charcoal. I finally remembered. The downside is acetone is highly toxic. Your method is safer.
And i have another question. What would you recomend that I do if I were to color glaze the picture traditionally? What materials should I use?

Rebeccak
09-25-2005, 09:03 PM
For anyone with an interest in using this technique...

>>>WARNING!!!<<<


PLEASE NEVER NEVER NEVER USE ANYTHING WITH BENZENE.

Benzene is HIGHLY HIGHLY TOXIC and should never be used really...with a ventilator's mask if absolutely necessary (which it shouldn't be if you're not a construction worker).

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

PixelColada
09-25-2005, 11:46 PM
Pushav - That's it! I knew it wasn't benzene. Thanks!

With regard to glazing, I wouldn't glaze with this technique after I did all my opaque line work. You'd end up rubbing out everything you did.

What I would do if I wanted a color to unify an initial wash over the whole piece would be to do a thin color wash across the whole thing and have a transition in that thin wash. You might go from warm to cool, saturated to unsaturated, light to dark etc. And then when yo have that established, pick out your lights with the kneaded eraser. Then I would draw back into those lights with opaque colored pencils.

If I needed to do a glaze over the whole thing after I was done, I would probably do it with acrylics with very little water through an airbrush. I would do a little at a time so as not to buckle the paper, or maybe mount the paper to something white like foamcore before spraying. I would also not try to load the airbrush with too much pigment and I would only use transparent colors for that.

I haven't tried to glaze using this technique as it's easier to do in photoshop after you scan it.

With regard to turpenoid toxicity, you might try simple green. I believe that is less toxic or non toxic. It doesn't smell harmless though. I think almost everything we use is harmful in some way when used to excess.

Rebecca - Thanks for emphasizing the warning about benzene.

Skurai - glad you liked the demo. I look foward to seeing what you do with it.

Rebeccak
09-25-2005, 11:55 PM
Rebecca - Thanks for emphasizing the warning about benzene.
No problem ;) ~ Sorry to have hijacked your post, but that stuff is lethal! I once bought a solvent containing it without knowing, and it's a BIG bad toxic chemical...no wonder I walk like a chicken. :scream:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

pushav
09-26-2005, 12:01 AM
Thanks a lot.

Painters that were in my drawing class in college used to like their brushes that was drenched in paint or turpenoid. I was shocked that they did not get sick. Lol. Good times.

Rebecca-Lol. That stuff is lethal. Thats is why i like digital paint. nothing to smell at all.

Rebeccak
09-26-2005, 12:06 AM
pushav,

True, but in many ways I miss the smell of turp and paint. I haven't done traditional painting in a long time, and while I am loving the neatness and non~contaminating properties of Painter, there is just something about touching brush to canvas that so far has not been replaced. ;)

Will you be doing an exercise for this tutorial? :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

pushav
09-26-2005, 12:24 AM
pushav,

True, but in many ways I miss the smell of turp and paint. I haven't done traditional painting in a long time, and while I am loving the neatness and non~contaminating properties of Painter, there is just something about touching brush to canvas that so far has not been replaced. ;)

Will you be doing an exercise for this tutorial? :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

I am thinking about it. I still have like 3 sheets of bristol left in my closet (LOL sad I know. I need to get some more lol. I wish that the paper was cheaper). Next step is getting some turpeniod or something like it.

I haven't done traditional painting in a long time
I have not either. Lol. I gave up on it and went back to using the pencil. Lol.
I have a dream that one day Pusha V will be able to paint traditionally and stop relying on his Wacom tablet.:sad:

PixelColada
09-26-2005, 09:47 AM
Pushav - Don't confuse Vellum with Vellum Bristol, they are two different animals. Drafting vellum is more like a thick tracing paper. That's the stuff you need. If you have tracing paper, that will work as well.

I've only recently started painting again, mainly as a result of teaching a painting class. I'm also going to be taking some workshops next month in Pasadena.

I missed working traditionally. It's very refresing to put he wacom stylus down.

Rebeccak
09-26-2005, 10:11 AM
Hmm, taking a Workshop from anyone I know? Something like a plein~air Workshop? Sounds fun!

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

PixelColada
09-26-2005, 05:04 PM
Hi Rebecca,

I'm taking one with Morgan Weistling, Sherrie McGraw, Jeff Watts, Margaret Sargent and I'm going to watch a demo by David Leffel.

No pleine air for me this time around, though I do need to work on it.

Are you going?

Rebeccak
09-26-2005, 05:16 PM
Wow, I've heard of Morgan Weistling and Jeff Watts, and I think I've heard of David Leffel. I happen to love Weistling's work ~ I only just saw his recent article in the American Artist magazine ~ amazing stuff. Won't be going, but am very envious! Would love to hear a report back from the Workshop ~ maybe you can post your stuff? That would be cool to see. :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

PixelColada
09-26-2005, 05:36 PM
I'll do that!

Rebeccak
09-26-2005, 05:38 PM
Hmm...Sheff goes to Workshop...Sheff comes back from Workshop...Sheff gives Workshop...*whistles innocently* :)

I've been dying for a traditional painting workshop, you know...*twiddles thumbs*

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

PixelColada
09-26-2005, 05:49 PM
That's what I was thinking. There are enough people here who work digitally so if I were to do one it would probably be traditional.

Just to let you know, the workshop takes place the week of the 8th. The Weistling and Leffel classes are full, but this was an incredible bargain.

Go to Artmethods (http://www.artmethods.com/) and check it out. I think there are some classes still open.

Rebeccak
09-26-2005, 05:55 PM
Sheff,

Thanks for that link! I think I went to one of these shows once, tho didn't take any of the workshops ~ at the Convention Center, right? I used to live right around there, near Marengo. Take lots of PICTURES for us! That would be schweet ~ if it's allowed. :)

Yes, I can imagine the Wiestling classes are full..what a talented guy, and he's relatively young, maybe his forties? Yeek!! He has a long time to paint, that guy!

At any rate, if you can bring us back a full report, that would be outstanding. American Artist seems to be stepping up to the plate ~ it used to be just a bunch of hokey watercolor still~lifes (no offense to the old ladies out there) but it seems they're gettin' real as of late. I bought their inaugural copy of the Drawing series ~ way cool. :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

pushav
09-26-2005, 05:59 PM
AH! I see. more like tracing paper.

Well I had to dig deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeep in my closet and I found some tracing paper from like 4 years ago. Lol only like 5 sheets left.

I was tested this out with water.
So I used a q-tip quick dipped in water some water and a number 2 pencil (My 2b 4b and 6b general's brand pencil worked the best when doing this.) and it some what worked. Lol. Not no where as nearly as good but it I like brush strokes that appears in the shading. I will have to det some drafting vellum. Tracing paper is a little to thin.

Rebeccak
09-26-2005, 06:05 PM
pushav,

Post up your results, babe ~ I think Sheff would really enjoy seeing them. :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

PixelColada
09-26-2005, 06:08 PM
Pushav - Turpenoid is not water based so it won't wrinkle the paper. You can still used water based materials such as gouache or acrylic as long as you don't use a lot of it and not much water.

Rebecca - I used to live on Euclid just north of Del Mar. I haven't been back in a while, but the Convention center is just south of the mall right?

Rebeccak
09-26-2005, 06:20 PM
Yep. :) Lol, I think all of Art Center used to live in that area. Great place, but it was kind of a pain to drive the 20 minutes to school, lol, Lida residents will forever hate us...:scream:

It's changed quite a bit though now...lots of new stores, I was there in August for SIGGRAPH and it was rather different than I remembered...well, actually, I had been back before then, but still it's changing rapidly.

I've thought off and on about moving back to LA, but no firm plans yet...I miss the smog. Lol!

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

pushav
09-26-2005, 08:27 PM
Pushav - Turpenoid is not water based so it won't wrinkle the paper. You can still used water based materials such as gouache or acrylic as long as you don't use a lot of it and not much water.

Rebecca - I used to live on Euclid just north of Del Mar. I haven't been back in a while, but the Convention center is just south of the mall right?


I used to get fish at a fish shop right off of Del Mar. Too bad the place closed down. Hey are you talking about that convention center that is Downtown? It is still there by the mall. That mall is in the worst of spots. I have not been in there in a while.

Yeah the water warped my paper lol. I will try to get some turp. and a black prismacolor pencil and tracing paper tomorrow from my craft store.

Rebecca- I basically shaded a circle. Lol. I was testing out this tracing paper.

Rebeccak
09-26-2005, 08:57 PM
pushav,

I didn't know you were a California dude. :) Wow, small, small world. ;)

Do you still live near there? It's a really beautiful area.

Cheers, :)

~RK

pushav
09-26-2005, 11:19 PM
Wow I just got some turpeniod!

This is miracle liquid. It smears without warping paper. I should have got some of this stuff a long time ago.

Thanks PixelColada, Your gonna make me a millionaire........
.......one day. lol.

Any pencil will work. But the softer lead pencils work better.
And tracing paper does work with the turpeniod nicely.:thumbsup:

I will have to try this on other papers.

I know that on heavy sketch paper like 50-70 pounds if you do the same method the pencils stay at the same times you will get a watercolor effect. This is interesting.:twisted:

Rebeccak
09-26-2005, 11:31 PM
Post 'em up!

You know, I was thinking that this would be a great technique to use with your *ahem* Master Copy for the Mix Tape :scream: *that kills me* thread ~ why not give it a shot? It's a perfect technique for that...you can lay the basis down with Sheff's method, then tweak with color in Painter...whaddya say? ;)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

pushav
09-26-2005, 11:53 PM
The hard part is how can I scan tracing paper to make it show up better.
Right now I am thinking about putting printer paper behind it when I scan. I should have bought more tracing paper. Lol. I was too happy that I found that turpeniod at my craftstore. It was hard to find.

Rebeccak
09-27-2005, 12:07 AM
Actually, tracing paper shows up fine, as long as you put the scanner's lid down, it serves the same purpose as a piece of paper behind it. At first during the Anatomy Review 001, I was tracing people's stuff and then scanning my reviews...they showed up fine.

Turp? Hard to find? Lol!

~Rk

pushav
09-27-2005, 03:56 AM
Here we go. I had to stack other papers behing the tracing paer so it would show up. I did not use and number 2 pencil nor prismacolor. I used my secret weapon my favorite pencil of all time, The Ebony pencil! (the sandford design kind) It worked well. No refs. used.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v222/pushav/random/turpenoid1.jpg

Controlling the smearing in somewhat hard. I am still practicing this.

Rebeccak
09-27-2005, 04:02 AM
pushav,

Great to see this! I like how you've started the upper left face, and the leg...these are both turning out well. Why not try a self~portrait? I think it's usually good to try to work from life...your imagination often skips a lot of details. Also, for smaller details, it might work to try a Q~tip as well, as I imagine it might be a bit difficult to control a tissue.

Good to see your work ~ I would say to try either the Master Copy with this technique, or a self~portrait next, as it looks like this is working well for you. It's a nice technique because it's a kind of transitional step between drawing and painting ~ which is exactly the phase where you're at.

Good luck!

~Rk

pushav
09-27-2005, 04:08 AM
The leg was tissue and turp.
The half face was with a q-tip.
The nice thing about this is you can use and eraser for highlights.
I deas are roaming in my head.:twisted:

Oh yeah my scanner lid's insides are black. Even that cusion thing in the sacnner is black. Lol. That is why i had to put something behind it.

Self portrait? Remember my eye keeps falling out. :D

Rebeccak
09-27-2005, 04:13 AM
Self portrait? Remember my eye keeps falling out. :D
Perfect! Just in time for Halloween!

No, I seriously think you ought to attempt the Master Copy with this technique. There's a free DVD involved if you do this...for me, that is. :D

pushav
09-27-2005, 04:20 AM
Perfect! Just in time for Halloween!

No, I seriously think you ought to attempt the Master Copy with this technique. There's a free DVD involved if you do this...for me, that is. :D

Are you willing to to work some overtime to pay for the dvd?

Wait wait wait. A free DVD of what? Lol you tried to get me. Lol. Nice try.

StylusMonkey
09-27-2005, 06:05 AM
great work! Love the vibrancy of your sketches and the controlled distortion.

I also used to use turps, but they made my fingers feel funny - not ina good way, so I started wearing those surgical rubber gloves and switched to odourless solvents as well since I'd get head spins from the turps.

I've started to gravitate towards graphite + prismacolor though, i just like the erasability of graphite since I like to pick out the highlights with a kneaded eraser and use it as a rendering tol as much as my pencils.

Keep up theg reat work!

m

StylusMonkey
09-27-2005, 06:07 AM
Sheff,

I agree! Magic man may have heckled me in the past, ROFL, but I'll still pimp his threads! :scream:
Nah, he's a great guy, lots of drive and initiative...and, I think he's like 12, lol. Just kidding, mm...nah, early twenties, I think. It just bothers me that there are people who were born in the '80s, lol...:rolleyes: :D :scream:


I are not 12, I am big boy now, I got toilet myself.

PixelColada
09-27-2005, 06:54 AM
I'm glad to see you guys doing something with this. I tend to forget that not everyone has access to a copy machine, but if you can scan your black and white drawing once you have it perfect the way you want it, you can print it out on your printer.

Then you can apply color only to the print and scan that when you're done. If you screw up with the color you can print another black and white drawing and start over.

When you get comfortable with this technique, you should try and be more daring. Take some risks with the printed copy that you wouldn't otherwise take with an original drawing.

When I get the chance, I'll do some master copies. For now I have to get some freelance work done.

Rebeccak
09-27-2005, 07:01 AM
When I get the chance, I'll do some master copies. For now I have to get some freelance work done.
Freelance, Schmeelance...we want to see Master Copies! :thumbsup: Just kiddin' ya, Sheff...sort of...;)

I are not 12, I am big boy now, I got toilet myself.
ROFL...:scream:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

pushav
09-28-2005, 12:07 AM
Ok I found a substitute if you do nit have a printer. (I have one but I wanted to find another way to do this.)

You can use Microns and Bic roller pens to ink over your pencils that ways if you ued the turp, you stuff will still be there.

I just tried this and it works.

You can see the image on my mixtape thread here
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?p=2685710#post2685710

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