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View Full Version : TUTORIAL - Shading Techniques (Various Media) - by Rebeccak


Rebeccak
09-05-2005, 08:35 PM
Guys,

This thread is dedicated to the study of Shading Techniques in Various Media. Thanks to warpyy for suggesting the idea!

Here is an example of a shading exercise which I was forced to do by my slave~driving high school art teacher (an amazing guy whom I completely credit for any artistic growth I might have had in high school) and which I now pass on to you! :)

I lightly sketched first with maybe a super sharp 2B pencil the outlines before shading.

Basically, the assignment was simple ~ look about your house / apt, find a small object, and shade it using an Ebony pencil that is kept super sharp with a metal pencil sharpener. The trick is to keep the pencil always sharp ~ so it helps to have several of them sharpened and at the ready ~ and to finely shade on the point in teeny tiny circles with varying degrees of pressure to achieve lighter or darker areas.

Wherever the light hits the strongest (the highlight area) you leave white.

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Shading%20Tutorial%20-%20Various%20Media/Exercise_1_Small.jpg

http://www.pjartco.com/images/ebonypencil1.gif http://www.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/213401/2/metal_pencil_sharpener.jpg

Rebeccak
09-05-2005, 08:39 PM
Umm...forget that I hadn't taken perspective at this point...:rolleyes:


http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/rebeccak5/Shading%20Tutorial%20-%20Various%20Media/Exercise_1_Small_Detail.jpg

Rebeccak
09-05-2005, 08:57 PM
Another way to shade traditionally is to cross~hatch with pen.

These are examples of drawings which I did just as an exercise well after I had graduated from college (these were done about a year ago, I think).

I basically used a Bic Grip Roller fine pen and started hatching away, being careful to follow form and to not create straight lines, if possible. Any pen will work ~ I often use ballpoint pen. I recommend drawing lightly a pencil outline first, then cross~hatching away. I think I just dived into this one, but it's better to start with a sketch.

Cross~hatching is not rocket science ~ you just hatch one way, then hatch another, until you get tired of it ~ then you come back to it the next day, and cross~hatch some more. :)

This is a copy of one of Rubens' fabulous drawings. I highly recommend doing Master Copies ~ as many as you can.

http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a35/rebeccak4/Sketchbook/rk_sketchbook_1B.jpg

Rebeccak
09-05-2005, 08:58 PM
Here is another example of using cross~hatching technique ~ again, a Master Copy using Bic Pen on Sketchbook paper.

http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a35/rebeccak4/Sketchbook/rk_sketchbook_2A.jpg

Rebeccak
09-05-2005, 09:07 PM
For More Traditional and Digital Shading Tutorials, please see:

REBECCA KIMMEL'S Anatomy Review 003: SHADING TUTORIAL AND HUMAN SKULL EXERCISE (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=259291)

There are numerous tutorials (mostly digital but also traditional) on shading in this thread, some excellent work posted by everyone, and there are links to everything at the beginning of the thread. Definitely check it out! :)

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-05-2005, 09:21 PM
awesome work,
i hope its okay to post now :)
thanks for doing this, i will try to practice some of this now. its already 23:20 so i will probably post my updates in the morning. i hope everyone will benefit from this.

cheers.


EDIT : some questions

looking at the roll of string. which shading did you do first, did you make the background shading first and then add ontop, did you use an eraser (if so which one),
do you sharp your pencils short or long, did you make the edges first and then add the shading.
i am coming from a technical side,i believe that i have to know all the theory before hand and know all the goring little details to actually practice them right.

Rebeccak
09-05-2005, 09:29 PM
warpyy,

Thanks! Post away. :)

Regarding your questions ~

The key to the first exercise is to NOT ERASE. This teaches you to be careful in your work and to pay attention to what you are doing. The most we were allowed to do was to take a kneaded eraser and lightly press the eraser to the page to lift areas which were too dark.

Kneaded eraser:

http://www.officedepot.com/pictures/sk/md/659771_sk_md.jpg

Also, yes, I started with a light sketch first (done with sharp 2B pencil) ~ you don't want to press too hard, as you will leave an indentation in the paper, which, when shaded over, will remain light, giving you an unwanted outline.

You can sharpen the pencil any way you want so long as it is SHARP all the time. The little gray metal sharpeners are great for this.

Hope this helps! Please feel free to ask any questions. :)

Cheers! :)

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-05-2005, 10:00 PM
-- The most we were allowed to do was to take a kneaded eraser and lightly press the eraser to the page to lift areas which were too dark.

oddly enough i found this method myself :)

-- Also, yes, I started with a light sketch first (done with sharp 2B pencil) ~ you don't want to press too hard, as you will leave an indentation in the paper, which, when shaded over, will remain light, giving you an unwanted outline.

only 2B, very very interesting.

-- You can sharpen the pencil any way you want so long as it is SHARP all the time. The little gray metal sharpeners are great for this.

can i use my small green sharpener :)

some of the strings looks like you took something sharp and cut or used a stencil on it.. its not that right ?

thanks.

Rebeccak
09-05-2005, 10:05 PM
warppy! *smacks own forehead* ~ you're right about the white lines ~ those were etched with that fabulous tool, the fingernail. :) Before you shade, you can make anything you wish to keep as thin white lines by scratching into the paper (preferably sketchbook quality paper) with your fingernail. Then, when you shade, the indented white lines will stay white.

Bear in mind, these exercises were done YEARS ago, so thanks to my folks insisting that I clean out my *shrine* at their home *sacred for years, now desecrated!*, I now have tons of my school artwork ~ yay. :rolleyes: :scream:

Anyhoo, yes, any sharpener should do. :)

Cheers! :)

~Rebeccak

Llynna
09-05-2005, 10:24 PM
woo, thanks rebecca for providing this tut :) i think your crossline shading is really awesome :)

Rebeccak
09-05-2005, 10:26 PM
Lynna,

Thank you! :) This is a nice compliment, I appreciate it. :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-05-2005, 10:39 PM
sleepy sleepy :) nice trick with the fingernail :applause:

EDIT : question, all the blackest of the black muscle curves are how did you add the black color to them, was it using the cross hatch, was it by just painting over without any pattern,
was it folloing the curves and just adding ink parallel to the curves ?

Rebeccak
09-05-2005, 10:57 PM
warpyy,

The darkest of the darks are achieved by repeated cross~hatching. :)

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-06-2005, 04:51 AM
good morning thread people,

@rebecca - you keep saying Bic Pen what is it ? the thin lines looks like something i can do with my 0.5/0.7 automatic pencil/lead holder. unless its not the proper tool i am going to use that for my next trial.

Rebeccak
09-06-2005, 04:55 AM
warpyy,

A bic pen looks like this:

http://www.streuartikel.ch/_php/images/bic-roller-grip-t.jpg

But any ballpoint or black pen (with a fine tip) will do. You should use the medium with which you are most comfortable.

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-06-2005, 05:11 AM
warpyy,

A bic pen looks like this:

http://www.streuartikel.ch/_php/images/bic-roller-grip-t.jpg

But any ballpoint or black pen (with a fine tip) will do. You should use the medium with which you are most comfortable.

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

omg those are actual ink pens, you cant erase if you make a mistake and everyone can tell :eek:, however it does sound like something i want to do.

Do you think 5 hours of sleep is enough for me to start sketching now?

warpy
09-06-2005, 06:25 AM
i am not proud to show this, but..
used the finger trick, and it worked very good. i am still very much clueless about the direction the shading strokes goes. i will try to do that zoom of the arm/body with cross hatching, maybe it will give me the right direction.

http://static.flickr.com/32/40724946_0bb4588666.jpg

@Rebecca - about your email, i will do as you asked me to. about the idea it was ment for a cgthread not for her.

:bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

Rebeccak
09-06-2005, 06:40 AM
warpyy,

Wow, I didn't know you would shade the actual object in the demo, but hey, I think what you did looks really cool! :)

I would suggest as practice to just find a group of small objects and light them with a lamp so that the light hits from one side or the other, giving you a highlight area and a shadow area.

Good objects might be: a plant, fruits or vegetables, a tape dispenser, scissors, a phone, a small box, any small object which you can arrange in an interesting way to use as a miniature still life.

Then, just sketch lightly these objects with a sharp pencil (being careful not to press too hard on the paper). After that, shade using REALLY TINY circular motions with your sharp, sharp pencil. Try not to smudge or erase. This really gets the feel of shading in your hand.

EDIT: The other key thing is to take your time. My perspective wasn't the best in the demo drawing, but try to work on getting the perspective right on your new still life drawing.

Then, post the results of this exercise, and we'll see what you have! Good work! ~And thanks for being understanding. :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-06-2005, 06:48 AM
Wow, I didn't know you would shade the actual object in the demo, but hey, I think what you did looks really cool! :)

-- thanks but i dont realy see any depth on it. i know i can do better

I would suggest as practice to just find a group of small objects and light them with a lamp so that the light hits from one side or the other, giving you a highlight area and a shadow area.

-- almost all of my work is faces, i never realy connected to non organic (objects), the sun is shining so maybe i should use it as the big lamp..


Then, just sketch lightly these objects with a sharp pencil (being careful not to press too hard on the paper). After that, shade using REALLY TINY circular motions with your sharp, sharp pencil. Try not to smudge or erase. This really gets the feel of shading in your hand.

-- that is what i was looking for, tiny circular motions. i will try that !! :bounce: :bounce: :applause:

Then, post the results of this exercise, and we'll see what you have! Good work, and thanks for being understanding. :)

-- np

warpy
09-06-2005, 06:51 AM
@ other people cruising this thread

i see you :eek: !
although it is nice to have this thread all to myself, i would enjoy to see more styles, to learn from other people aswell, it might be night time where you are at but....keep that in mind

cheers.

NOOB!
09-06-2005, 03:44 PM
make it seem so easy rebecca :rolleyes: lol

Jelousy.

warpy
09-06-2005, 03:52 PM
first try at cross hatching, i am very pleased with the results.
hopefully i can improve my understanding of things.
the proportions and prespective of the body parts is horrible and i know it. so please dont comment on that, if you do want to comment you can comment on the cross hatching technique, i would appreciate it.
http://static.flickr.com/26/40825688_8f98f65baf.jpg

Rebeccak
09-06-2005, 04:16 PM
warpyy,

Not too shabby! Not too shabby at all! :thumbsup: Kudos to you for going gung~ho for this! :)

Here is my suggestion for you: should you accept this assignment... ;)

Seriously, I think you should try the following: do 7-10 Master Copies this week. Find Figurative Drawings on the web by artists such as Rubens, Michelangelo, Pontormo, Raphael, etc. and copy them, using the cross~hatching technique to do your copies no matter WHAT technique the original artist used.

Post these drawings here, and we'll critique them, on technique alone if that's what you want.

What do you say? :)

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-06-2005, 04:22 PM
heh, thanks for the compliment.

i would try a few of those Master sketches, BUT i dont know if i can commit to that amount,
i will do my best as always. do you happen to know where those Master Sketching are hiding :). you can kick my lazy a$$ if you wish.

Rebeccak
09-06-2005, 04:26 PM
warppy,

They are hiding on 'Google'. ;) Just type Rubens, hit "Images", and untold riches shall be yours. :)

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-06-2005, 04:28 PM
is google the planet on the right ?

warpy
09-06-2005, 04:34 PM
i can only find painted pictures, does rubens have any sketches .. or is that what you ment?

Edit: i guess you did

edit2: found 2 of them yaaay !

dbclemons
09-06-2005, 06:12 PM
When shading, it's important to pay attention to the contour you're trying to create. Bend the lines as you shade, like Rebecca has done in her leg illustration. That straight hatching technique is referred to as feathering. This helps display a more convincing soild form on the page. Also experiment with shorter lines when cross-hatching to give a sense of texture, when that's required. You can also create shading with stippling small dots, but that can get tedious real quick.

Another trick with graphite shading is to do a rubbing. Lay your paper on top of a rough surface and shade across it so the texture below shows through, similar to Rebecca's thumbnail trick.

The nice thing about writing pens is how you can create a nice faint mark with a light touch. That's almost impossible to do with dip pens or markers. Markers also hold the ink line longer than dip pens do, so you can more easily make a long shaded section.
-David

Rebeccak
09-06-2005, 06:22 PM
David aka dbclemons,

So...when will we see another tut from you, hey? Feel free to post a shading tutorial here, and I'll change the name of the thread so it reflects a more general shading tutorial area. :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Rebeccak
09-06-2005, 06:22 PM
David aka dbclemons,

So...when will we see another tut from you, hey? :) Feel free to post a shading tutorial here, and I'll change the name of the thread so it reflects a more general shading tutorial area. :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-06-2005, 06:39 PM
i noticed some horrible parts, but the top side of the forearm and the arm itself is good imo.
http://static.flickr.com/23/40871226_e11c1fcbee.jpghttp://static.flickr.com/32/40870744_3f67102d1a.jpg

Rebeccak
09-06-2005, 06:43 PM
warpyy,

Alright!! Just keep going with these, I'm not going to crit them per se right now. The key at this point is just to get practice ~ as you do more of these, you will get better. Good show, warpyy!!! :bounce:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-06-2005, 06:45 PM
its alright, at this stage i am do not need any crits, i know my flaws.
once i get to the point i realy need a crit i'll request it..

Rebeccak
09-06-2005, 06:50 PM
warpyy,

Gotcha. ;) No problem. :)

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-06-2005, 06:55 PM
i forgot to say thanks for the advice, i realy like this. you dont have to reply again for this one liner lol.

Dervish
09-06-2005, 07:13 PM
not stricly a crit warpyy...

i know you are practising the crosshatching itself, but you shade evrything with the same value, like theres no light, aint the aim to have the right density of strokes( = value ) in the right place, or you just want to get better with the lines(direction of these) before you start with that? if that whats troubling you, then try not to think of it as flat brushstrokes on paper, but try to visualize the form in all 3 dimensions, and then just to follow the surface.

excuse my english, i hope its understandable ^^

btw, try to use white paper only, its hard to visualize something when theres already lines defining the flat surface of the paper

warpy
09-06-2005, 07:26 PM
not stricly a crit warpyy...

i know you are practising the crosshatching itself, but you shade evrything with the same value, like theres no light, aint the aim to have the right density of strokes( = value ) in the right place, or you just want to get better with the lines(direction of these) before you start with that? if that whats troubling you, then try not to think of it as flat brushstrokes on paper, but try to visualize the form in all 3 dimensions, and then just to follow the surface.

excuse my english, i hope its understandable ^^

btw, try to use white paper only, its hard to visualize something when theres already lines defining the flat surface of the paper

first of all thanks for commenting,

the math paper i used was in class today, i do not sketch on that paper at all.
about the density, you are right about the density on the second pencil sketch.
i used a 0.7 automatic pencil. as soon as i started it felt wrong but i just had to finish it. it seems that pencil is not the right tool for me at this point. i will try a 0.5 or one of those bic pens next. your advice about visualizing is right on the money, i do try that but sometimes i dont get the right crosshatch curves. i guess it will come with time.

i am quite tired now, but i will fetch me a pen and try to do another one.

Rebeccak
09-06-2005, 07:43 PM
By the way, folks, anyone should feel free to jump in here and try some shading exercises ~ either traditional or digital. I would recommend to anyone what I recommended that warpyy do ~ which is to do 7-10 master copies (in any medium / media) per week, and post them either here or other appropriate thread on the Anatomy Forum. :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Dervish
09-06-2005, 07:44 PM
maybe offtopic, but this might help ya, it helped me a lot =)
the loomis books ^^
http://www.saveloomis.org/

and Art Tutorials, Theories, and Book Recommendations
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=226083

not on this technique really( sorry ^^) but really helpfull stuff

have fun :thumbsup:

ps: sorry rebecca , would like to but no time, workin on the challenge, having job interviews, and we have nice weather :scream:

Rebeccak
09-06-2005, 07:46 PM
Dervish,

Not off~topic at all ~ thank you for the links! :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Dervish
09-06-2005, 10:49 PM
below a little example of what i meant( excuse the quality, didnt had much time ), A is a computer render( example for reality, haha ), B i shaded with a softedged brush, C is a crosshatch, and D a crosshatch without light. the question now is in wich of the 3 painted ones does show the shape best?
id say its B( mainly cause C is of really crap quality, they should be equal in that manner ) with D you can hardly say wich form it exactly has, though its a very simple form

the line direction doesnt really define the form, it only helps with this, the main factor is the light( shading )

hope it helps and is understandable, loomis explains such stuff much better ^^

http://img396.imageshack.us/img396/6528/render7wv.jpg

dbclemons
09-07-2005, 12:07 AM
David aka dbclemons,

So...when will we see another tut from you, hey? :) Feel free to post a shading tutorial here, and I'll change the name of the thread so it reflects a more general shading tutorial area. :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Who me? :eek: ;) Some good examples might be the thing to see, although there are tons of them out there already. I'll see if I can work something up that's decent, or give a good link.

Warpyy, I actually like that all-over value thing you got going there, but you can let the paper help you out by using it for your highlight (where you don't draw.) Also try using weight (thick-thin) in your lines. (yeah, we need some good examples here.)

-David

warpy
09-07-2005, 08:54 AM
another attempt, each part of the arm was drawn using a different 0.5 pencil leds.
it looks like i put more effort into one part over the other.
this time i got hilights and visible crosshatching, you can see the direction they are going

it might be a good time to help me here, toward the end of the sketch i was kind of clueless toward the direction the cross hatching should go, and there are some parts near the elbow that i couldnt figure out at all.

http://static.flickr.com/31/41077321_c2d7766f11.jpg

warpy
09-07-2005, 01:18 PM
this time using my tablet...
http://static.flickr.com/23/41117607_2d3632a677.jpg

warpy
09-07-2005, 01:50 PM
looking at rebecca's crosshatch i see she does not curve the lines but uses different "layers" that form the curve and all the lines are straight... this means i have to make more trials.

Rebeccak
09-07-2005, 03:40 PM
warppy,

Nice sensitivity in the digital piece! Keep on truckin', warppy, you're doing a good job. :)

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-07-2005, 03:50 PM
thanks, here is another piece
http://static.flickr.com/32/41153841_3f3eb1f617.jpg
bigger version (http://static.flickr.com/32/41153841_3f3eb1f617_o.jpg)

Rebeccak
09-07-2005, 03:59 PM
Wow, warppy, looking good there! I'm impressed! :thumbsup:

warpy
09-07-2005, 04:18 PM
well considering i looked at yours and did mine.. it was easier :)

dbclemons
09-08-2005, 03:34 AM
At Rebecca's suggestion, I decided to post a few examples of shading techniques by a couple differnent artists. These demonstrate methods of shading with ink lines. I had to keep the images small so I hope the deatils are clear enough.

Here's a drawing by Joseph Clement Coll:

http://www.dbclemons.com/tutorials/coll01.GIF
It has an almost painterly feel to it in how all the forms are carved out with the lines. Instead of outlining the shapes, like the buildings in the background, they are drawn with short broken strokes to represent the details, and the lighter tone in this area is very consistent. Notice how all the lines are fairly short and straight. He also varies the density and thickness of the lines to create darker values. The technique he uses on the rocks in the background is repeated in the shirt; a sort of a woven pattern that Coll used often in his other drawings.

Here is a close-up of an ink drawing by Virgil Finlay:

http://www.dbclemons.com/tutorials/finlay02.GIF
All the lines follow a diagonal path, and the shading is created completely in terms of values made by the density of the lines. The forms are not shaped with the lines, but are just suggested by the values they make. This technique creates a dense atmosphere where nothing is outlined, and all surfaces have the same texture.

Here’s a detail of another Finlay drawing.

http://www.dbclemons.com/tutorials/finlay03.GIF
He uses a great variety of lines in this image, and the short strokes create a wide range of value and texture.

Okay, one more Finlay (yes, I love his stuff.) He's a good example here since he uses so many different textures in his drawings.

http://www.dbclemons.com/tutorials/finlay04.GIF
I wanted to show this one as an excellent example of stippled dots of ink. He shades the face beautifully this way, and the dot pattern has to follow the contour of the face to be convincing, but he also mixes in some cross-hatching in the darker areas.

I hope these drawings inspire people to try different techniques with ink pens.

-David

Rebeccak
09-08-2005, 03:57 AM
David,

These are great examples, thank you for posting these! :)

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-08-2005, 06:01 AM
awesome david, is there a chance you could put hires files of these somewhere ?
thanks a bunch.

dbclemons
09-08-2005, 12:10 PM
You're welcome. There are probably some copyright issues with posting the full images, so I'll have to be careful to avoid that. Try a search on-line to see what's out there already. There are a couple decent books on Finlay available as well.

-David

erilaz
09-09-2005, 07:28 AM
Here's a poor Rubens attempt with a uniball pen while I was waiting for a render. I screwed it up, but I thought I might as well finish it!

Mmmm... scratchy:
http://img389.imageshack.us/img389/4855/suckyrubinsattempterilaz3yw.jpg

Rebeccak
09-09-2005, 02:30 PM
Martin,

Great to see you doing this exercise! I will try to post the original Master Drawing from which I made this copy later...it's definitely a better source from which to draw. ;)

One thing I have recommended to folks enrolled in the CGWorkshop (and I'm amazed ~ it's up to 19 now!!) is to draw 7-10 Master Copies per week in the medium of their choice. This way, by the time the Workshop begins, folks should have 25-40 master copies under their belt and will be well warmed up for the Workshop. I also encourage you guys to post your Master Copies here on the Forum as you have done (in the appropriate threads).

I am glad to see that you have started drawing and posting your work! :) Keep doing more, as you know, many great Drawings of Michelangelo, Raphael, Rubens and the like can be found through Google image searches.

Keep drawing! :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

dbclemons
09-09-2005, 03:34 PM
The art encylopedia site has a good search engine:

http://www.artcyclopedia.com/


-David

Rebeccak
09-09-2005, 03:37 PM
David,

Great link...definitely gotta check that out thoroughly. :thumbsup:

~Rebeccak

jinnseng
09-10-2005, 01:07 AM
This is an interesting thread. I'm amazed at some of your linework Rebecca! Crosshatching lines, especially using pen seems like such a difficult technique of shading to master. I'm more about smudging and rubbing. Here are a few examples

http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a325/jinnseng/Violin.jpg

http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a325/jinnseng/bagsmall.jpg

I use 6b compressed charcoal sticks and generals charcoal pencils no harder then a 2b. To smudge I use an old cotton t-shirt. For finer areas I use a smudge stick. Those are always founds at art stores, sometimes they're called paper stumps or blending sticks. I don't have any kind of tutorial set up! Sorry. This is another method of shading I thought I would bring it. The problem with this method is it's hard to get any texture because everything is smoothed out. I'm still learning.

Rebeccak
09-10-2005, 01:16 AM
jinnseng,

ROFL, you totally anticipated my 'Tutorial' question and did a total body block!!! Hahahahaha!!! :scream:

These are great images, and thank you for posting them! There is always a very nice, calm atmosphere in your works which is very appealing. It doesn't look as though you were rushed in these drawings, and as a consequence, it's very enjoyable to look at them. :)

Thank you for sharing, and I hope you will post more shading pieces here. I would really encourage anyone who has something to contribute here to do so. :)

And, thanks for your compliment. :)

Cheers! :)

~Rebeccak

dbclemons
09-10-2005, 01:35 AM
The French call those blending stumps "tortillon." Oo-la-la. :)

-David

Rebeccak
09-10-2005, 01:46 AM
David,
Alrighty, time to see some of your shading work!! Post 'em up! We know you got 'em! :bounce:
:)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

jinnseng
09-10-2005, 01:47 AM
Rebecca
Thank you for the compliments! There is some truth to your observations of my work as far as not rushing into it. I know that I'm slow but i'm fine with that because I feel like as long as I keep working and don't give up on the piece I will eventually pull it out. It doesn't matter if I spend 10+ sometimes! I also know that the more I practice the faster things will come. Maybe I will try to show some WIP of my next drawings.

Dbclemons,
I've heard them called that also. I usually hear the term Tortillon to refer to the smaller size stumps that are usually hollow in the middle.

Rebeccak
09-10-2005, 02:01 AM
jinnseng,

Slowness is not a bad word in my dictionary. :) I like quality over quantity, and it's refreshing to see your work. :)

I think you would really enjoy looking at some of the Dutch masters like Vermeer and still life painters of that era. I have spent a lot of time in the National Gallery of Art in DC ogling these amazing oil paintings and wishing that I had been a Dutch male painter back then, lol! :) You might want to invest in one or two good art books of Still Lifes, as it is amazing how quickly one can forget great works of art. Art books will last you a lifetime, and are a much better reference visually than the web.

Cheers! :)

~Rebeccak

dbclemons
09-10-2005, 03:11 AM
Okay okay :) Here's a couple pencil sketches from not too long ago. The hands are my own. The face is the actor Robert Morley from "Beat the Devil." I like to freeze a DVD frame to sketch expressions and poses.

http://www.dbclemons.com/tutorials/shade01.jpg
http://www.dbclemons.com/tutorials/shade02.jpg

One of my favorite still life painters is a Frenchman, Jean Chadin.

-David

Rebeccak
09-10-2005, 03:13 AM
David,

Great! I knew we could shake a few drawings out of you. :) These are cool ~ do you mean Chardin? 17th century ish? Pheasant pictures and such? Yep, he's amazing! :)

Thanks for posting these. :) Feel free to post more... ;)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

dbclemons
09-10-2005, 03:29 AM
Oops, yes that "Chardin." And also Fantin Latour. I remember seeing a show at the San Francisco Museum of Modert Art that was all about Dutch still life paintings. It was phenomenal.


-David

Rebeccak
09-10-2005, 03:40 AM
David,

Why not do a master copy of one of these paintings and post it here in the Master Copies thread?

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-10-2005, 01:16 PM
i couldnt get my hands on a bic pen, so for now i am using the cheapest ball pen i could get my hands off.. prespective has issues... but i was watching tv while sketching this..

http://static.flickr.com/25/41955753_882cbf30e7_o.jpg

Rebeccak
09-10-2005, 03:22 PM
warpyy,

Keep going, on your next foot drawing, try to not have any distractions...feet are tough, and require your attention. They're needy like that. ;)

~Rebeccak

erilaz
09-10-2005, 03:36 PM
I'm a big fan of Albrecht Durer... his shading skills were great!:D

warpy
09-10-2005, 03:40 PM
lol, its my first foot.. its not needy yet

Rebeccak
09-10-2005, 03:43 PM
Martin darling,

Why not do a copy of one or several of his works? :thumbsup:

~Rebeccak

erilaz
09-10-2005, 03:56 PM
Martin darling,

Why not do a copy of one or several of his works? :thumbsup:

~Rebeccak

Well, one can only try!

Rebeccak
09-10-2005, 04:19 PM
Exactly. :)

RobertoOrtiz
09-11-2005, 01:02 AM
Hey Rebeccsa as promised I am posting a couple of pencil drawings I did today for this thread.
The funny thing is that I have not drawn with pencils for years so it was fun.

Also I am adding an ink drawing
of a place here in DC you might recognize.


http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b216/robertoortiz1/cgtalk/nat1.jpg

-R

warpy
09-11-2005, 08:12 AM
nice to meet you roberto, 7k posts.. impressive :)

Rebeccak
09-11-2005, 02:58 PM
Rob,

I think it would be more interesting if you did drawings of organic things like trees, plants, etc...why not visit the Botanical Gardens, or sketch on the mall itself? Frankly, you yourself can model these inorganic objects far better than render them...so it would be interesting to see you approach organic subject matter (trees, people) in your traditional work.

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

RobertoOrtiz
09-11-2005, 11:26 PM
Well I went sketching to the Botanical Garden today....

Thanks ofr the previous review....Ill see if I CAN GET SOME PEOPLE TO DRAW.
-R

Rebeccak
09-12-2005, 01:11 AM
Rob,

Nice drawings! Wow, you actually did what I suggested...cool.

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

warpy
09-13-2005, 12:54 PM
on the beach, with some friends, but she moved quite a lot...
its not real looking enough because.. well she moved its her fault. :P
http://static.flickr.com/28/42967926_598ae5aec8_o.jpg

Rebeccak
09-13-2005, 02:10 PM
warpyy,

Not bad! Keep going with these. :thumbsup:

~Rebeccak

RobertoOrtiz
09-18-2005, 06:34 AM
Rob,

Nice drawings! Wow, you actually did what I suggested...cool.

Cheers,

~Rebeccak
As promised..

Here are a charcoal drawing I did two years ago..

-R

Lyneran
11-05-2005, 09:01 PM
ms rebeccak! i was just wondering if you recommend copying master works for beginners too, or shouLd it foLLow onLy after a foundation on anatomicaL knowLedge?

thanks for the shading tut btw, very informative. and it's nice to see your oLd work :thumbsup:

Rebeccak
11-06-2005, 02:36 PM
Lyneran,

I think anyone should do Master Copies ~ to my mind, it's one of the best ways to learn. I think doing a combination of Master Copies, Life Studies / Sketches, and Anatomy Drawings is the best formula for learning how to draw. :thumbsup:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Lyneran
11-07-2005, 05:04 PM
oh i see, ok i'LL try that then. thanks so much ms kimmeL!!! :D

Rebeccak
11-08-2005, 12:32 AM
Lyneran,

No prob! When you're ready, here is the thread to which you should post (and check out, also!) :)

Master Copies - Post Your Copies From The Great Masters! 2D/3D D/T DRWG/PTG/SCULPTURE (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=257446)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

franzboas
11-16-2005, 11:27 AM
hi
i am sending two pieces. the first one i think is just right for this thread.. the second one,, well
not really sure.

yours sincerely
shreyas

<img src="http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b353/hadrian7/4.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">
<img src="http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b353/hadrian7/11.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">

<img src="http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b353/hadrian7/5.jpg" alt="Image hosted by Photobucket.com">


p.s. theres a third one just for kicks

batavia
12-04-2005, 02:58 PM
Hiya!

Here's my first participation in this anatomy forum. To get started I tried to copy Durer's Praying Hands.
Unfortunately, due to my cheap digital camera most of the detail are lost.
Next time I'll try to do a pure cross-hatching copy . I have trouble cross-hatching; It always get messy when I try to.

(bic pen, white sketchbook)

http://img216.imageshack.us/img216/6126/durerstudy36ws.jpg


Here's Durer's original sketch:
http://gallery.euroweb.hu/art/d/durer/2/11/3/05prayin.jpg (http://gallery.euroweb.hu/html/d/durer/2/11/3/05prayin.html)

Now I notice that the hands aren't as slender as it should've been.

Rebeccak
12-04-2005, 03:02 PM
batavia,

Glad to see you here! Do you use Photoshop very much? You can tweak the levels of your image by going into Image > Adjustments > Levels and clicking "Auto". This sometimes helps the light / dark quality of your image. But no worries, we can see what's going on in your image. :)

This is quite a nice drawing! Would you like to tell us something about your training / background? :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

batavia
12-05-2005, 12:05 PM
Yes, I did use photoshop to adjust the level. To think of it, I should've sharpened it because it looks too blurry.
About my background:
I just graduated from high school; I've had no formal training or anything, only classes in middle and high school. I did have a chance to go to an art program thing in high school but didn't end up doing it. I had fabulous art teachers in middle school. But in high school, my art and drawing teacher weren't really "artists".
I started drawing at an early age; I'm more of a doodler than a drawer, though. I haven't done much traditional medium other than pencil and pen. For some reason starting a real painting is much too intimidating...
I also do a bit of 3d modeling and some photoshop digi painting.
In recent years my doodling and practice have declined, so right now I'm planning to practice more and get into art again.
Oh yeah, thanks much to you RK and other artists here who's putting the little spare time they have into helping newbs like me.

Rebeccak
12-05-2005, 02:09 PM
batavia,

Thank you for telling us a bit about yourself! That's a really impressive drawing for someone who's just graduated from high school! Are you planning to pursue art at all in college? If only as a hobby, I would encourage you to do so. :) There's a lot to be said for doing things for personal satisfaction in life, even if those things don't become a career for you. :)

Happy to help in any way I can! It's great to see the work you guys/gals are posting. Looking forward to seeing more of your work! :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

ACantarel
03-23-2006, 12:53 AM
Well, as Rebeccak already said, cross-hatching isn´t a rocket sience but I still have some basic questions. I run into the problem which surface direction I should use for the hatching or should I even mix them? I saw several versions and mixes and I´m a bit confused. Do the stroke itself also follow the surface with some bending of itself or should they all be small straight ones? How much do I cross them?

As you can see here, sometimes I mixed the types 1 and 2 to 3 - and even 3 and 4 together. Am I searching for a sience where none can be found? :p Maybe I search too much rules because of my 3D background?

http://www.cantarel.de/shading-direction.jpg

I used a simple black ballpen. I think I also need to get rid of this cartoonline surrounding the stuff. But in this case some areas looked not so clear without it.
Thanks to Roberto for the inspiration :)

André

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