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depleteD
09-04-2005, 03:41 AM
Whad up,

As everyone knows their are qualities that make up an exeptional artist. Having the technical skill; control with the pen or mouse. Being able to observe reality. But what I find most important and not really discussed on this forum is how to be more creative.

CgTalk is such an excellent community for artists, but I find it more focused on skill, how to replicate reality to the closest iota. I find this to be an excellent thing, but I have not read many threads on how to generate more creative thinking which is vital to getting a job as an artist.

I started reading a book for one of my university classes. I thought it would be lame and I would return it before the return date and get my money back. It turns out that this book is rather usefull. It discussed ways on takeing your creativity to the max.

I propose that on this thread we share tips on makeing us more creative. As well as our inspirations, and where we go to find just interesting things about the world, what books we have read, what movies we like, hobbies music ect. Even start up discussions about cool stuff.

Some tips that I have read on how to make yourself a more creative individual.

So...
--Relax, allow yourself to day dream

As a university student coming up to a super competitive job market I find this almost impossible to do. I feel that if I take a break from practise I will fall behind. How would I balance this?

--Illuminate the mind, insight generation, brainstorm, look for new and different relationships

As a university student, I also lack the time and money to travel. I have found something that allows people to do my traveling for me. www.flickr.com (http://www.flickr.com) I really like that site, I can see stuff from around the world and its easy to click on someone else to see their pictures from a tottaly different part of the world. What do you guys do for insight generation?

I would also like to read and explore things outside my interests. What is interesting to you?
I'm big fan of anime, I have recently seen howls moving castle, steam boy and spriggan.
I collect comics avidly, and I love movies. But as you can see, this is a passive entertainment and doesn't really encourage creativity. I definatley need to branch off and find some new interests. What are some good books?

So... what do you do to enhance your creativity?

-Andrew
Trying to prac what I preach. http://forums.cgsociety.org/images/icons/icon7.gif

Rebeccak
09-04-2005, 04:00 AM
depleteD,

The most useful book I've ever read with respect to creativity is "The Artist's Way" by Julia Cameron. That woman knows how to get an artist out of a rut! She talks about removing roadblocks to creativity, such as self-doubt, negative thoughts, etc. and I swear, that book got me out of a real creative slump such as I had not thought would be possible.

She has written numerous books on creativity and I attended one of her workshops when she passed through town. It was great! I started painting again after years of not doing so. It was one of those steps which I took which has been incredibly important for me in terms of feeling valid as an artist, and I really recommend her books to anyone.

She has written numerous screenplays for films and was once married to Martin Scorcese. I believe she wrote the screenplay for "Between Heaven and Earth".

Hope this helps!

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

EDIT:

Good books:

ANY BOOK by Margaret Atwood. My favs:
Alias Grace
Cat's Eye
The Handmaid's Tale
The Robber Bride

Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Waves by Virginia Woolf
The Discovery of Heaven by Harry Mulisch
Andrew Wyeth: A Secret Life by Richard Meryman
Duchamp by Calvin Tomkins

Stahlberg
09-04-2005, 04:55 AM
I haven't read that book,
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0874776945/104-8563942-8808736?v=glance
seems interesting. Thanks Rebecca.

My 2 cents:
Scientists have discovered we have creative thoughts ALL THE TIME, but that they're usually so tiny and insignificant compared to the deafening background noise, our brain needs extra peace and quiet to 'hear' them.

Long walks are good... an hour or more. Rides on public transportation are excellent too (and almost as cheap). Just make sure you're not sleepy or hungry or there's someplace else you should be soon. You can do this at home too, but: be alone. And disconnect the phone. Maybe even take a hot bath.

If you're really desperate:
1) Put your favorite music on, and switch off the sound on the TV. Switch channels randomly. The effect can be truly psychedelic.
2) Borrow random books from the library, and open them in the middle. Read a bit in one, then open the next one. Say, a book of poetry mixed with a book on how to build a model steam engine.
3) Google on words found at random in a Thesaurus or dictionary.
4) Scribble on paper with your eyes closed, then, turning the paper, try to 'see' something in it.

MattVogt
09-04-2005, 06:38 AM
Wow great comments folks zzaannkkkuuuu

SOE digital
09-04-2005, 09:19 AM
Classical music baby!

Rebeccak
09-05-2005, 05:54 AM
Steven,

No problem. :) Julia Cameron also wrote a great book "The Vein of Gold" (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0874778794/qid=1125895999/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-4522222-0585721?v=glance&s=books&n=507846) which also addresses creativity issues. I haven't read it completely (only skimmed) but it is similar in approach and message to "The Artists' Way", her first true classic.

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

ashakarc
09-05-2005, 06:55 AM
Wow Steven, I do all that and top it with a longer list of insane things to treat myself, and they work..sometimes.

My advice will be: Seek beauty everywhere, employ negative energy into construcive one, capitalize on your ego, yet not selfishly on the account of others, live your moment at maximum. I know, it's easier said than done, but the key is to be aware of YOURSELF as the one with the hands of g.o.d. (Good Old Dude)
Oh, and make sure you stay tuned to CGTalk :)

mfanyikazi
09-05-2005, 03:22 PM
To resolve a creative impasse i normally try to expose myself to some unpredictable observable item. For example a stream of flowing water. I find it helps un-block oneself because it's ever-changing. And constantly moving. I think that's why walks are successful also. Its good to be moving while thinking.

However sometimes we just dont have the luxury to take long walks, sooo... the sweatbox approach comes into effect. Look for a book by De Bono called LATERAL THINKING. It's a valuable textbook on creativity. :)

a

depleteD
09-05-2005, 04:48 PM
ah this is awesome.

Thanks guys.

Another thing that I have done is nigh pughs dvd from gnomon. The first one, he dows how to break out of your design trends. Its a form of scibbling, much like the drawing with your eyes close one, mayb e draw with your feet. But scribble then try to see something. I really recomend that dvd.

Lunatique
09-06-2005, 04:32 AM
I think creativity, more than skill, is something that has more to do with natural talent/gift than nurture. For example, there are a lot of people who have been trained as musicians since they were children, and had gone to the best music conservatories, but as amazingly well as they can play instruments and the music written by others, they draw a complete blank if asked to composed original music.

The reason most people place emphasis on skill is because it's something that could be learned and improved on, while creativity is a lot more elusive--in most cases you either have it or you don't. I think there are ways to hone your creativity though, but it's really more of a change of mentality and habits. I'll list some stuff that I think will help:

- When you have some freetime to think (waiting for bus, shower, bathroom, before falling asleep, standing in liine..etc), start fantacizing and daydreaming about stuff. Ask yourself hypothetical questions like "What if I turned invisible right now, and it would only last for 3 hours? What would I do?" or "What if I walked outside and everbody is gone--just disappeared? What if they never come back? How would I live my life differently?" or "If a group of people jacked this subway train in the compartment next to this one, what would I do?" or "What if when I wake up tomorrow, my wife doesnt' remember me at all, and all traces of me having been in her life has disappeared? How would I try to convince her who I am?" These hypothetical questions not only train your creative muscles for coming up with storytelling solutions, interesting imagery, emotional and intellectual challenges, it also trains your mind to reason and solve problems.

- Solve other people's creative problems. When you watch a movie, TV show, listen to a piece of music, look at a piece of visual art, read a book..etc, if you don't like it, ask yourself why, and ask yourself if you could fix it, what would you do? Doing this helps you identify weaknesses in the creativity of others, and trains you to solve creative problems.

- Dissect the creativity of others. Ask yourself what are the reasons that makes you a fan of a film, TV show, book, music, painting..etc. List all the things that are great about them, and try to find patterns among them. All great works share similar qualitities--those are the things that are compelling and fascinating to us. Get to know those qualities well because you'll need to have them in your own creative works.

- Be hard on yourself. Look at your own work. Be very honest with yourself. Do you like what you see/hear/read? How does it compare to the works of people you admire? What's missing from your own works? Identify and isolate the missing elements so you can begin to improve on them.

- Reality is often more interesting than fiction. Learn about history, current events, be educated about socio-political issues, learn about many things that might or might not seem like they are useful to you at the moment. For example, you might not give a damn about the stock market, but lets say you happened to pick up a financial magazine one day and read an article about the stock market--which you thought was boring at the time, but a few months later, you're writing a screenplay, and all of a sudden the stuff you read about becomes the compelling plot-twist in your screenplay. Be a well-rounded person. Travel and and go see things you've never seen, experience things that are far removed from your normal life, and soak up everything about this world we live in like a big, fat sponge. All of it will become valuable weapons and ammunitions in your creative arsenal.

That-JC
09-06-2005, 05:20 AM
Valuable thread, thanks folks!

I believe that everyone (except perhaps those in poor mental health) IS very creative. However creativity is discouraged in many cultures and some families, and so many people have shut their's down or let it get rusty from lack of use.

And to prove this i came up with the following thought experiment:
"Do you dream? I understand that everyone does, although some people don't remember theirs. Remember a few dreams now. Weren't they wild and exciting and very creative? Unless you think your dreams come from your ancestors or something, you'll have to admit that all that creative experience came from you. You are creative."

I also like long walks for getting ideas or solving problems, but the most effective technique i've ever found is self-hypnosis. Like any skill, it takes practice, but not a lot. In a month or less of daily practice for 1/2 to 3/4 hours a day, you can be effective. Then you just suggest to yourself something like: "When i get up tomorrow, i will have or remember several creative ideas, as soon as i drink from a glass of water." When you get up, have a glass of water and paper and pencil handy. Drink and record the flow of creative ideas, without judgement. Later, you can decide which are most useful.

But don't suggest that you are going to remember your dreams, so you can keep a dream journal. I tried that once and within a month i was writing dreams 2-3 hours a day! I remembered every tiny detail, but didn't have the spare time, lol.

After doing this for a couple of years, i happened to take a test for creativity which was part of someone's reseach project and scored off the chart. Of course measuring creativity has got to be difficult and maybe his project was not up to snuff.

There are a lot of scams, New Age BS, and uneeded products around self-hypnosis, so be careful of your info sources. You don't need any products. The best site i had seems to be gone, but here is another:
http://www.bcx.net/hypnosis/

Even Scientific American had an article about how effective it is - and it is for me.
There are some warnings, not about danger, but about what just won't work. Mostly about not suggesting what is impossible, or that which you REALLY don't want - not that it will do any harm, just doesn't work. You can't hypnotize yourself into making more money per month than your unconscious thinks you're worth, if money is an issue with you, for instance. Or suggest yourself into losing weight if your subconscious WANTS to be fat, etc.

Thanks All :o)

That-JC
09-06-2005, 05:21 AM
Valuable thread, thanks folks!

I believe that everyone (except perhaps those in poor mental health) IS very creative. However creativity is discouraged in many cultures and some families, and so many people have shut their's down or let it get rusty from lack of use.

And to prove this i came up with the following thought experiment:
"Do you dream? I understand that everyone does, although some people don't remember theirs. Remember a few dreams now. Weren't they wild and exciting and very creative? Unless you think your dreams come from your ancestors or something, you'll have to admit that all that creative experience came from you. You are creative."

I also like long walks for getting ideas or solving problems, but the most effective technique i've ever found is self-hypnosis. Like any skill, it takes practice, but not a lot. In a month or less of daily practice for 1/2 to 3/4 hours a day, you can be effective. Then you just suggest to yourself something like: "When i get up tomorrow, i will have or remember several creative ideas, as soon as i drink from a glass of water." When you get up, have a glass of water and paper and pencil handy. Drink and record the flow of creative ideas, without judgement. Later, you can decide which are most useful.

But don't suggest that you are going to remember your dreams, so you can keep a dream journal. I tried that once and within a month i was writing dreams 2-3 hours a day! I remembered every tiny detail, but didn't have the spare time, lol.

After doing this for a couple of years, i happened to take a test for creativity which was part of someone's reseach project and scored off the chart. Of course measuring creativity has got to be difficult and maybe his project was not up to snuff.

There are a lot of scams, New Age BS, and uneeded products around self-hypnosis, so be careful of your info sources. You don't need any products. The best site i had seems to be gone, but here is another:
http://www.bcx.net/hypnosis/

Even Scientific American had an article about how effective it is - and it is for me.
There are some warnings, not about danger, but about what just won't work. Mostly about not suggesting what is impossible, or that which you REALLY don't want - not that it will do any harm, just doesn't work. You can't hypnotize yourself into making more money per month than your unconscious thinks you're worth, if money is an issue with you, for instance. Or suggest yourself into losing weight if your subconscious WANTS to be fat, etc.

Thanks All :o)

CGmonkey
09-06-2005, 07:48 PM
Lunatique - I think you're wrong based on my own meandering experience. You don't just 'have it or not', it's not that simple. It's not untill the late part of my life I've been starting to get really creative, not because I didn't do any creative work earlier.. It has accelerated with age and emotional growth, both intellectual and psychical.

While others have a natural talent and will pump out good designs when they hit a pen, there are some who can achieve it by hard work.. Then I guess there's the bunch that cannot do anything creative (creative as in other than spaceships and naked chicks).

Stahlberg - I really love your advices, gonna give 'em a try.

Lunatique
09-07-2005, 04:21 AM
CgMonkey - That's why I said, "I think there are ways to hone your creativity though, but it's really more of a change of mentality and habits." :D I'm sure as you got older, your mentality changed, as you became wiser, more observant, more analytical..etc.

PSR
09-07-2005, 11:48 AM
It could be more useful. To ask ourselves, how, not to block our creativity, rather than how to enhance it.

It seems to me, many creative blocks are due to self censorship. Caused by not recognising the value of unexpected outcomes. A simplistic example: you begin a painting of a figure in a simple background. As it nears completion, you inadvertently spill a bottle of ink, over your work. Instead of seeing trees and a possible forest setting for the figure, it is screwed up and discarded.

Another blockage, is the tendency to subordinate or dismiss our own ideas. As no good, or simplistic in comparison to others.

Kanga
09-08-2005, 02:09 AM
How to enhance creativity,.... hmmmm seems very personal. There are waves of dis, un exinspiration and my personal favorite is to work through them. If you think about what kind of art you are doing there is always work that has to be done that doesn't require inspiration but,... well needs to be done anyhow.

Don't be afraid to make crap, it's necessary, you have to wade through the rubbish to get to the good stuff. I love the line: 'Inspiration is a lady that visits every so often, if she finds idle hands she moves on'. Keep looking at the very best work, the stuff that excites you. Keep busy.

Don't fear not being the best. This entire world is so absorbed with arrivals they forget the journey. The absolutely most important thing is to surprise yourself. A good day is a day when you did something you never thought you could do.

May the force be with you:thumbsup:

Imagus
09-08-2005, 02:41 AM
As a fairly prolific artist (musical, visual and written), I have a few of things that I do/have done from time to time that help break me out of creative "ruts". (I very, very rarely have creative blocks).

1. Write down/remember your dreams.

I forget where, but I read this once, and began keeping a dream journal. Since your brain never truly stops functioning, once you've set your mind to writing your dreams down, you begin to remember them more vividly. And, oftentimes, those dreams will show you things your consciousness would cause your to overlook in the waking world.

I built an entire animated television series concept out of a dream I had once. It works. :)

2. Release all expectations ("freeverse")

Don't try to make anything specific, just start working. See what happens. Don't concentrate on technique, don't worry about what your lines or riffs or sentences look like, just do the first thing that pops into your head, regardless of how much sense it makes. You may discover something new and/or interesting that inspires you to create.

3. Do what you shouldn't do

A lot of artistic training involves learning tricks and tips on how to do things. Instead of worrying about how to do something, try doing exactly what you're not inclined to do. Instead of mixing colors on a pallette, try mixing them as you paint on the canvas. Instead of tweaking your digital brushes, create a painting using a single, large default one. Paint with the mouse instead of the Wacom. It will get your mind moving in a different direction, and free you up to try new things.

4. Take a break

It seems obvious. But when there are tough deadlines to overcome, and a pressing demand for completed works, it's often very difficult to break away and just relax. Force yourself to take an hour or two, a day if possible, to just not worry about things. When you come back, chances are you'll have a whole new outlook on things.

5. Think "what if..."

Try looking at things with a "what if" attitude. You're buying coffee. What if... the coffee is actually an elixir of the immortals? You're eating a sandwich. What if... the sandwich doesn't really exist? This will get your mind moving in different, random directions, and get you thinking in a new way.

These are just a few suggestions. I've considered doing a tutorial thread/series of threads on the creative process, including exercises, but I'm not sure how much of a demand there would be for such a thing, or if I'm really qualified to do so... :)

depleteD
09-08-2005, 04:42 AM
Keep em coming guys.

I branched out today, decided to go out and prac photography, never done that before, and yet i want to be a good painter. Ha. Anyway, I also did something else that I dont normally do. I jsut walked around and looked at stuff for the sake of it. Looked at fashion designs.

Man, my friend showed me some stuff from that Magna Carta Game, holy shit. THat is some creative inspiration.

I'm gonan go read a book or sumthin.

-Andrew

ynvamsi
09-08-2005, 06:45 AM
hi Lunatique, (member.php?u=2652)


today only i read this thread, Lunatique i liked u r views.


THANX.

donseeg
09-08-2005, 06:58 AM
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0961454733/104-6721815-2188731?v=glance

This book "Art and Fear" is a pretty interesting and quick read. You might find something that speaks to you personally.

The suggestions are very good ones and I think I have used them all. I really do not have many significant creative blocks. I do admit that I am often uncertain about how creative I am but I think that is a different issue.

I find it interesting that while sometimes a quiet walk along a river, stream, or in my case, a mountain path or somewhere out in the desert gives the perfect setting for introspection and is exactly what I need, at other times I need to be almost overwhelmed and bombarded with visual and audio noise. It is really extreme. Sometimes out in the desert, it is so quiet you think you can hear your own heart beating and other times, the noisiest place I can find is what I want. State Fairs, zoos, airports, all these types of places work very well for me. I think it is much the same as "freeverse" mentioned earlier. You go with the flow and let new sounds and sights trigger new ideas.

I always carry a sketchbook. Yeah, I know it sounds trite but it really does work if you approach what you are sketching in the right way. Here are a couple ideas that I find useful.

1. approach you sketchbook in the same way you might a diary by assuming that no one will ever see what you are doing. This is a very liberating idea when you get down to the basics. As soon as you are able to let go of the idea that what you are drawing is for public view, you will quit trying to draw "pretty" pictures. When you do not care what an image looks like, you will really start to draw. Some things will be random scribbles and others will be more refined. It doesn't matter. Of course if you want to show your sketches it is fine....it is more the mindset that I think is important.
2. Use bound sketchbooks. Resist the impulse to throw anything away. In the future, you might find the perfect idea in some random pencil/pen doodle.
3. Use a medium that will not hinder quick sketching. I guess everyone has a favorite drawing tool and I have seen beautiful sketches made with about everything imaginable. For me, the perfect sketch tool is a Prismacolor or Stabillo 8046 pencil. Line, tone, dark and light values are all easily accomplished.
4. Never erase.

I guess one last thing is to work through any block. Doesn't mean you shoud not take a quick break but for me, I have found that when things get tough artistically, I am generally learning something even if I am not aware of what it is at the time.

I guess it is different for everyone but there have been some excellent suggestions that I think I will give a try.

Cheers
Don

chaostest
09-08-2005, 08:25 AM
redaing about history,science,physics,etc. believe it or not.i find myself asking questions like What if my head popped and an eggplant sprang forth,in which the vines of truth grew plentiful ,creativing a matrix of biology,good to the last egad.?....I beleive creativity is bred in all,[even those with mental health,thats a diferenrt conversation though.]but lost int hose who sacrifice it to the horrors of the world..greed,anger,lust,pride,you see where im taking this...........

ekah
09-08-2005, 08:26 AM
It seems to me, many creative blocks are due to self censorship...

...Another blockage, is the tendency to subordinate or dismiss our own ideas. As no good, or simplistic in comparison to others.

Don't be afraid to make crap, it's necessary, you have to wade through the rubbish to get to the good stuff...

Don't fear not being the best. This entire world is so absorbed with arrivals they forget the journey. The absolutely most important thing is to surprise yourself. A good day is a day when you did something you never thought you could do.


As Kanga said, it is indeed very personal. I like what's been said by both PSR and Kanga. Very nice thoughts.

To me, being creative isn't about being a good artist or not or having some measurable talent. It's something else all together. I believe it's both a process and a trait.

I too think that these creative blocks or self censorship can be helped through freeing ones own thoughts. It certainly can be nurtured through one's own will, but it's also true that certain societies, family members, or even friends can either help the process through encouragement, or hurt it through indifference or even disregarding creativity altogether. I feel fortunate to have been around people who were always encouraging and engaging when it comes to sharing or exploring new ideas or interesting thoughts.

Fear is another one of those demons that must die along with insecurity. Be inspired rather than crawl back into a hole from self pity, or your creativity will rot with you.

Things I found helpful for me:

One may have very interesting thoughts, but these thoughts are lost when time passes. Jot them down or scribble on napkins when it comes to you, however mundane it may seem to you. My brain seems to be most active late at night or very early in the morning. I don't know if there is a biological explanation for this, but I find it to be true for me. You will often find other ideas in the process of doodling and scribbling. Don't doodle or sketch with posting the results in one of these forums in mind. You will inevitably be self sensoring without even realizing it. I wouldn't force it either. If you feel like vegging out, then veggie out. If you want not to think and would rather meditate, then meditate.

Long walks are always good. Moments of quiet or silence will be deafening for those used to living in big cities. For me, it's a necessity. Because I grew up in a big city, I also crave for visual stimulation from time to time. If you live in a big city, simply watching people can be very interesting. If you are able to sketch them, even better. I actually find watching TV depressing. I prefer to watch a good film instead.

I am not into those 'how to be creative' type books and am a skeptic when it comes to those things, but if it helps some people, hey, why not. However, I think it's not a bad idea to do things once in a while that doesn't require following a tutorial. After all, we are not vegetables without any ability to think for ourselves.

In the end, I think it's about each person finding his or her own voice through a process that is unique to each individual.

ekah

ekah
09-08-2005, 08:50 AM
Journey of an Absolute Rookie: Paintings and Sketches at ConceptArt.org:

I'm sure that many of you have seen this, but I found it inspirational and interesting to see the progression of someone's drawing ability. I think the progress he made is impressive and admirable. A good example to follow for aspiring, frustrated illustrators and painters.

Jonathan Hardesty's drawings 3 years ago: http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=870 (http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=870)
His work now: http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=46352 (http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=46352)

He did "bare" his soul for everyone to see his progress. He is currently attending an atelier in South Dakota. http://www.panturastudios.com/ (http://www.panturastudios.com/)

Jonathan Hardesty's web site:
http://www.jonathanhardesty.com/

setmenu
09-09-2005, 05:07 PM
I think it also important to be in a kind 'playtime' mentality , it is really easy sometimes just to get wound up and remove the joy from an endeavour, life is short.
Another thing to remember is that the current piece is does not have to represent the sum total of your creative essense.
Which means do as many pieces as possible and bring each to some sort of conclusion, to clarify, stop when you cannot economicaly learn anymore from a piece.
Overworking something can destroy the mind!



.

Schwinnz
09-09-2005, 06:50 PM
--Illuminate the mind, insight generation, brainstorm, look for new and different relationships

As a university student, I also lack the time and money to travel. I have found something that allows people to do my traveling for me. www.flickr.com (http://www.flickr.com) I really like that site, I can see stuff from around the world and its easy to click on someone else to see their pictures from a tottaly different part of the world. What do you guys do for insight generation?

As an answer to this very specific issue, I have strong belief that living in a highly culturally active city like New-York, Los-Angeles, London and the like will probably be the best option to burgeon your creativity. It is then your task to take great care of it to make the flowers burst. :)

Creativity is not a passive thing, you gotta work on it.

joshmckenzie
09-11-2005, 10:57 AM
BBC Radio Four have just finished broadcasting a three-part series on creativity - it's not a "how-to-be-creative" type programme, but an exploration of what creativity is. You can listen to each 30-minute programme online.

Here's the programme description from the BBC's website

We make, we create, we paint, we write, we think we discover and we invent. Humans are endlessly creative. From our ability to utter completely new sentences every time we speak to the artistic and scientific genius of Picasso, Shakespeare or Einstein. Do scientists or psychologists know very much about what creativity actually is, or which bit of our brain is in control when we do? In a new series Ian Peacock unravels the myth, science and psychology behind creativity.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/science/creativegenius.shtml

mustan9
09-13-2005, 04:26 PM
The reason most people place emphasis on skill is because it's something that could be learned and improved on, while creativity is a lot more elusive--in most cases you either have it or you don't. I think there are ways to hone your creativity though, but it's really more of a change of mentality and habits. I'll list some stuff that I think will help:

This sounds like a random roll of the dice. One person happens to grow up to be creative and another is unlucky. I would like to disagree (but just from a friendly manner). I would agree that being creative requires a healthy mind that can effectively think creatively. Doing drugs, not reading, dropping out of school, and watching TV all your life would reck this important thinking muscle. A mind is a horrible thing to waste.

Choice Theory in psychology states that a person can control their thoughts and behaviors by the choices they make. So a person could choose to sit down, and try to be more creative. They could read about the topic, go to school to study the issue, and they could model after others. This theory would mean that everyone has the same chance to develop to the same abilities in being creative. We don't see this happen very often, because it's hard to go from flat creative thinking to something richer and deeper.

Personality Theory in psychology states that a person's thoughts and behaviors are based upon character, experience, and personality. Such as the personality of the child that is carried onto adult hood, and the basic animal instincts that we are born with. We all become scared if there is a loud strange noise. This is basic instinct and we all have it.

I think creativity is a mix of both. We can loose our ability to be creative if we choose to no longer exercise that ability. Still, we can't say that some people have it and some people don't. Because it must be a basic instinct that everyone is born with. If we put a child on an island all his life by himself. He would still show creative abilities in being able to solve life survival problems.

One of the major defining characteristics of being human is being creative. Few animals in the world can solve complex problems, and you need creativity to solve problems.

With all that said. Few people become effective at being creative. They just don't put the effort into developing the ability, and most treat their minds the same way they treat their bodies. They get fat, lazy, and waste away.

EDIT: Sorry guys if I went off topic :)

Kanga
09-13-2005, 08:27 PM
..... I would agree that being creative requires a healthy mind that can effectively think creatively. Doing drugs, not reading, dropping out of school, and watching TV all your life would reck this important thinking muscle. A mind is a horrible thing to waste......

Down through the ages many creative geniuses have been absolute beasts and have done much worse than you describe. Defining creativity like art is a circular argument which is many faceted.

Personal creativity is a great thing, the only time you get into trouble is if you try to benchmark it. We are competitive creatures by nature and increasing personal ability is fine. When we start comparing we forget the enjoying part. Clever is the man or woman who loves what they do. This frees up your creativity.

I know some pretty fat creative people.:thumbsup:

Madyeti47
09-18-2005, 06:59 PM
This should be a sticky thread! I found alot of this advice really helpful.

helicopterr
09-19-2005, 03:30 AM
I going to the zoo or watching nature shows to be very helpful sometimes.

keithc
09-19-2005, 09:19 AM
hi,
i dont know how many of you'll are familiar with and/or practice meditation...
i believe that meditation is the best way to enhance and explore ur creativity.
meditation encompasses a little of everything that you'll have mentioned before in this thread.
many a time people dont find the time to meditate and some dont attempt it either because they think theres a method of doing so.
ive tried my own little technique out, and it seems to work...
pick up some of ur favourite images(in ur head) it could be an austrian scenery or blue waters and islands in malayasia...or even rivendel for that matter
picturing this(with ur eyes shut) and roaming this place using ur imagination and filling in the detail (such as 'this road leads me through meadows') and then u actually walk thru the meadows...ive done this and sometime in the course of this process u can have what i would call a 'life review' type of flash back or a series of really fast moving images, usually these images provide an insight into realms that are either new to me, unexplored or absolutely bizzare.
try it out in the most cliche way, sitting cross legged like an indian sage(sadhu) and relax...block out all sounds and distractions. i usually do this late in the night coz thats the only time that i have peace and quiet around here...but i believe that mornings are the best time. another suggestion...try some rythmic chants(and deep breathing to go with it). i usually have prodigy's 'narayan' running thru my head...and i dono how...it works!!
my insights would include temples(mayan), water creatures(who were surprisingly very funny), time warp machines, super humans(something like john travolta from battle field earth) etc.

dreams also play an important part in my life, dreams have cooked up some crazy and yet wild images in my head, and when i wake up, i make it a point to run through all that i dreamt of and draw out characters that i encountered.

i have also realised thru the past years that when im thinking hard about a particular project, i rarely get any inspiring thoughts. but i get an idea from the most unlikely places!
brainstorming with 5 ppl or more eases the thought process, just jot down the mose irrelevant remark from the last person in the world who u would think is creative. its saved me alot of time in the past.

ive never set expectations, no time deadlines (like 'in 10 minutes or 10 days i will have a brilliant and creative solution to my problem') coz expectations dont help when they arent met time and time again. however solutions to problems usually come up days after a project is done away with. just let it flow...and ideas always come along!

cheers!

Wbilliam
09-28-2005, 08:01 PM
Classical music baby!

Can you recommend some.
:)

Lunatique
09-29-2005, 02:59 AM
ok,Can you recommend some.
:)

I'll shoot off some names that are not your typical mainstream classical stuff that everyone knows (Mozart, Beethovan..etc).

Debussy - Listen to his Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun. It's one of the most brilliantly orchestrated piece of orchestral works.

Stravinsky - Listen to his The Rite of Spring. When it was first played publically, it shocked the audience. Modern film scores owe so much to this masterpiece.

Ravel - Listen to his Daphne and Chloe Suite. It's widely considered the most masterful piece of orchestration in the history of orchestral works.

Holst - Listen to his The Planets series, modern film scoring also owes a lot to his works.

Barber - Listen to his Adagio For Strings. Absolutely amazing and heartbreaking. One of the finest string orchestrations ever.

Tchaikovsky - Listen to his Romeo and Juliet. Very beautiful piece of work, and also quite influential on modern film scores--particularly sweeping, romantic scores.

smackbringer
09-30-2005, 04:12 PM
I struggle the most not just with creativity but with a lack of creative energy, particularly in the evenings after I get home from a long day of work paired with a long commute. My best solution for that is drink a big mountain dew and play some of my favorite music. That usually picks me back up energy wise. As far as inspiration, I like seeing other people's art especially on CG talk. It does get me out of a rut especially when I see styles that are very different from mine. Really makes you think that your way is not the only way. Personally, I like to daydream, something that I've been quite good at. (Always got me in trouble in Elem. School) I like to develop characters or a universe with a story around it. I get an idea and then I'll try to pick up the same daydream later and try to wrap another layer around the onion and i keep going over it and over it again until I have all the necessary information about the universe to be able to put it down on paper like it was fact. To bad i'm a crappy writer.

Great topic BTW.

Ilikesoup
10-02-2005, 04:31 AM
We can loose our ability to be creative if we choose to no longer exercise that ability. Still, we can't say that some people have it and some people don't. Because it must be a basic instinct that everyone is born with. If we put a child on an island all his life by himself. He would still show creative abilities in being able to solve life survival problems.

One of the major defining characteristics of being human is being creative. Few animals in the world can solve complex problems, and you need creativity to solve problems.

Well stated. The ability to think creatively is one of the foundations of being human. Man is physically weaker than many creatures in the wild and is vulnerable to the elements so he uses his creativity to protect himself. Creativity is borne of necessity.

Artistic creativity can be stimulated by creating a need for art:
-Take a saying like "time heals all wounds" or "all that glitters is not gold" and try to represent it without words. BTW, it's what we do in the Daily Sketch Group (check my signature for a link to the DSG).
-Make scraps of paper each of which has a word on it. Put them all in a hat and pick two words. Try to make a drawing based on those words.
-Make up a dangerous situation and make up a road caution sign to warn people.
-I've had people suggest drawing with your "other" hand or making random squiggles and trying to make them into something recognizable. This forces you to SEE things creatively. Drawing from cloud shapes works, too. I once created a comic strip character from swirl patterns in a stucco ceiling. :)

A caution about creativity:
-Like others have said, don't be a perfectionist if creativity is your goal. A quick sketch with a few written notes will get your idea out and available and free your head for the next great idea. You can always go back later if you want to do a finished piece.
-Do things that interest you. If a subject doesn't interest you or it's too far beyond your ability to draw it's common to abandon the project. Don't feel bad about this -- just move on to something else that interests you. Creating art should be fun! :bounce:

TobyArt
03-30-2006, 03:33 AM
-I've had people suggest drawing with your "other" hand or making random squiggles and trying to make them into something recognizable. This forces you to SEE things creatively. Drawing from cloud shapes works, too. I once created a comic strip character from swirl patterns in a stucco ceiling. :)

Huge fan of drawing random lines on paper, also stucco walls & ceilings are great!, silhouettes of curtains and other things at night etc can bring ideas flowing. There are pictures all around you just have to look for them. Even letting your eyes zone out on text in a book or newspaper can bring lines for your next great work to the eyes. Your favorite book may contain your best new art!

I recently started drawing every animal in a little animal dictionary I had. Only got thru the first 2 pages, but got some great new characters that I can use later on.

The Daily Sketch Group (http://forums.cgsociety.org/forumdisplay.php?f=130) has also helped a lot with getting my mind running. Even if I don't have time to participate, it's a new thing to think on every day.


I'm not really "normal" though so some of these may or may not work for you

bonestructure
04-02-2006, 12:58 AM
Oddly enough, I have a very rigid way of boosting creativity. I work on duplicating scenes from favorite movies or photographs from my morgue. It's the challenge I think, being forced to try to figure out the lighting, texturing, modeling, etc. It gets the juices going and kicks my brain into gear.

Kanga
04-02-2006, 01:38 AM
Youz guyz is totally upsidedown!

The secret to creativity is Marker Gas! Copic, AD it doesnt matter. I have a full set of AD markers open next to me 24/7. Think about it,... who comes up with all that crazy stuff? The writters.

On the top floor you have god sitting in a corner. Next floor down the writters. The floor beneath them the concept guys. Every writter knows you have to position your desk right above the concept guys because their markers omit the magic gas! Stonned the whole time. This is particularly true in the games industry, proof is that holywood is making films inspired by games. Why has holywood become less creative. Not enough Marker Gas!

The first guy to invent photoshop that has marker odour is gonna make a million.

Cheerio Chris

Stahlberg
04-02-2006, 10:50 AM
:argh: . .

Jukebox
04-02-2006, 01:32 PM
Can you recommend some.
:)

some of the songs in my playlist

la companella - franz liszt
turkish march - mozart

Kanga
04-02-2006, 01:50 PM
:argh: . .
This a writter trying to cure writer's block directly?

Stahlberg
04-10-2006, 02:03 PM
I think he's sniffing markers, that's what the image says anyways. Amazing what you can find on Google Images.
Actually that's another way to help your creative block, go Googling (Images) for any random word, then when you find something interesting continue Googling on that. The object of the game is to follow some kind of weird trail as far as you can. :)

Kanga
04-10-2006, 02:51 PM
...The object of the game is to follow some kind of weird trail as far as you can. :)

Yeah the ammount of info is kind of overwhelming and addictive. Using the internet for me is often like looking for a bolt and comming home with a skyscraper. I like it! Sure fire cure for the creative doldrums.

Cheerio Chris

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