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View Full Version : Bridging the gap between 2D and 3D texturing..


lildragon
02-22-2002, 06:51 AM
What's the secret? I've been well engaged in Beast Machines when it was in it's Prime (pun intended ;)) and I was recently shown this site that had numerous still shots.. and it came to me, that this is a style I would love to learn, take a look below and let's hear how you would accomplish something like this


http://lildragon.cgcommunity.com/temp/EP17-2.jpg

http://lildragon.cgcommunity.com/temp/EP20-4.jpg

http://lildragon.cgcommunity.com/temp/EP26-6.jpg <--------- my favorite

http://lildragon.cgcommunity.com/temp/Jetstorm.jpg

these are just a few of many, any tips?

cheers

erikals
02-25-2002, 07:57 AM
Hi there!

I did something simillar to picture number one and two once in Photoshop. Unfortunatly I had never done it before so I couldn't get the edges of the objects to be sharp, they were kind of blurry. (Later I got a Wacom and realized how much that helped, in my opinion it's perfect for tasks like this). Back to the edges. You have to use the path tool in PS a lot to make selections, and it's a good idea to save the selections. Also, substracting, adding and intersecting different selections is very helpful. I do this my holding the Ctrl key down, then press the thumbnail, or Ctrl + Alt, or Ctrl + Shift + Alt on other thumbnails. Picture number one and two might have been done in 3D then heavily retouched in PS, but you can get this effect only using PS as well, it's a time consuming process, but hey, isn't everything. :) Pict number three and four is probably first done in 3D, then retouched in PS.

(Sorry, I don't have the examples here...)
Erik

studiomiguel
02-27-2002, 02:08 AM
I'd start with an AI file blocking in the shapes and then use the paths to create masks in PSD and lots and lots of airbrushing.... tons of time to illustrate this stuff.

lildragon
02-27-2002, 02:58 AM
thanx guys for the tips, I'll give it my best go :)

Reeks
03-05-2002, 08:02 PM
I know this is a photoshop forum, but these images are clearly modelled (possibly retouched in photoshop)

I think it's entirely in the painted texturing. The creators of these images aren't aiming for photorealism, so they've done away with bump mapping, specularity, reflections and the like. They're still Hi res models, but they rely on the painted texture.
Also, they're not reaching for cell shading for once .. nice :)

I'd suggest using just Lamber shaders for the most part, and upping the ambient or luminance values to avoid unnescessary lighting effects.

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