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View Full Version : USATODAY:Studios Working with Colleges to Train Animators


RobertoOrtiz
08-12-2005, 01:27 PM
QUOTE from TOONZONE:
"Walt Disney, DreamWorks Animation, and Pixar are collaborating with colleges and univesities to train the next generation of animators, USA Today (http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2005-08-10-dreamworks-technology_x.htm) reports. The studios are creating educational programs to ensure that students and animators already in their employ are trained in the CG techniques that are currently in high demand."
>>LINK<< (http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2005-08-10-dreamworks-technology_x.htm)
-R

Bonedaddy
08-12-2005, 05:47 PM
Why just animators...? *weep*

worker_bee
08-12-2005, 05:55 PM
QUOTE from TOONZONE:
"Walt Disney, DreamWorks Animation, and Pixar are collaborating with colleges and univesities to train the next generation of animators, USA Today (http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2005-08-10-dreamworks-technology_x.htm) reports. The studios are creating educational programs to ensure that students and animators already in their employ are trained in the CG techniques that are currently in high demand."
>>LINK<< (http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2005-08-10-dreamworks-technology_x.htm)
-R


This is the stupidest thing I have ever seen and most of the blame lies with DreamWorks. Training students so they can get cheap labor. LAME

jeremybirn
08-12-2005, 06:42 PM
most of the blame lies with DreamWorks. Training students

There's no truth to the "mostly Dreamworks" claim at all. The article happened to focus on a few animation interns at Dreamworks, but most studios do similar alliances with schools, letting employees go teach courses for animators (and many other postiions), they all do internships and training programs, etc.

(Worker-bee, I know you're on here every day trying to promote that studio, but were you really hoping that people would disagree with your post and post pro-dreamworks material for you??? That's really lame.)

-jeremy

beaker
08-12-2005, 07:22 PM
Jeremy: he is actually bitching about DW, not the thread.

Ninjas
08-12-2005, 08:22 PM
I have never seen a corporate plant before. Thanks for pointing that out Jeremy. Facinating

beaker
08-12-2005, 08:28 PM
It's not a corporate plant.

SheepFactory
08-12-2005, 08:30 PM
This is the stupidest thing I have ever seen and most of the blame lies with DreamWorks. Training students so they can get cheap labor. LAME

Am I missing something here? Are you suggesting studios should start hiring students for senior positions?

worker_bee
08-12-2005, 09:55 PM
There's no truth to the "mostly Dreamworks" claim at all. The article happened to focus on a few animation interns at Dreamworks, but most studios do similar alliances with schools, letting employees go teach courses for animators (and many other postiions), they all do internships and training programs, etc.

(Worker-bee, I know you're on here every day trying to promote that studio, but were you really hoping that people would disagree with your post and post pro-dreamworks material for you??? That's really lame.)

-jeremy

Dude what crawled up your ass..Im bitching that DW is doing this not the thread and there is no reverse psychology. I gunuinely wish DW wouldnt be so proud of promoting cheap labor or any other company. Get off your high horse.

Bentagon
08-12-2005, 09:59 PM
Those articles are always so confusing. They keep on saying "animators" while what they actually mean is "lighters, riggers, modellers, ...". Although it are definitly important parts of the creation of a 3D animated film, I still think it's strange to call them animators. Walt Disney didn't call his Ink & Paint dept. that.

Anyways, I don't think this really is "news", but the more articles about animation, the better :D Spread the love!

- Benjamin

jasonsco
08-13-2005, 06:42 AM
Alright, so here I am speaking as one of the people actually at DreamWorks, DOING the training for all the new people, as well as working with the outreach program mentioned in the article.

First of all, they're not "interns" . . . they're full employees, that get paid fairly well, with full benefits. Yes, they don't get paid as highly as senior artists, but who does when they're starting out? DreamWorks Animation is a union shop with the Animation Guild, so you can actually look up wages on their website.

Second of all, yes, it's not just "animators". It's a USA Today article, and they write for the general ignorant public, so they just generalize. I have trained lighters, TD's, surfacers, etc. (in fact, I trained the two new guys mentioned in the article).

So, I hope that helps shed some additional light on the subject. Jeremy's also right: a number of the larger studios have some kind of outreach program, including a bunch not mentioned in the article, like Sony Pictures Imageworks, Rhythm & Hues, etc.

My Fault
08-13-2005, 07:18 AM
This is the stupidest thing I have ever seen and most of the blame lies with DreamWorks. Training students so they can get cheap labor. LAME

I don't understand what you are railing against here. It's a good thing that studios are doing this. Why do you assume there is some malevolent goal. Studios want talent at all levels. If there wasn't these flicks would cost an insane amount and no one new could enter the field. I know at AM being able to work with folks from many of the big studios is hugely beneficial to us. It leaves us better prepared for the future, which in the end benefits everyone.

Kimotion
08-13-2005, 08:09 AM
If you choose a school solely on the fact that the instructors are professionals from major animation companies, be extremely careful. These schools tend to drop names to lure students, only to find that the instructor used to be a contractor or an administrative assistant there.

I am lucky to be currently involved with a school that has both distinguished professionals AND teaching ability. I am unfortunate to have experienced the opposite at my former school.

On the flip side, studios getting more involved with animation education is overwhelmingly a good thing for both the industry and the student.

xynaria
08-13-2005, 09:51 AM
The transition between being a student or graduate and working in a studio is somewhat immense. Unless a college bends itself into only becoming a training ground for larger studios, I don't see a lot of minuses in having this kind of arrangement but there's quite a lot of pluses all round unless I've missed something here.

beaker
08-13-2005, 09:54 AM
If there wasn't these flicks would cost an insane amount and no one new could enter the field.Actually I strongly disagree with this(the first part). In my experience entry level people actually cause more work and things cost a lot more in the long run because of it. They screw up a lot, work about 5x slower then everyone else and give deadlines that they can never meet. Therefore the company needs more middle management to watch things and cost even more because your middle management is almost equal to the number of artists. Entry level people are there to learn, so it is to be expected, but this is the truth of things (I remember doing these things when I first started).

There is nothing better than a well oiled machine. 15 employees all very experienced and well paid can produce just as much work as 30-40 employees with the normal mix of entrylevel/green, mid range and senior people. Even though that 15 man team has the illusion of costing more in the beginning, most of the time they will bring things in on time and done right. The 30-40 man team will screw up a lot and everyone will end up working 100 hour weeks(costing the company just as much in overtime) in order to fix screwups and if they are really lucky, they won't push the deadline.

My Fault
08-13-2005, 07:07 PM
A good point but I think in the real world not every studio can be comprised of just the top level talent so there will naturally be a balance of both. Having studios more involved in the training will mean that the newbies who are first starting out will probably be stronger workers then those who haven't had that training.

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