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Sulla
07-30-2005, 06:19 AM
I ran across a site tonight that I found rather interesting. They scan paintings to make 3D copies for people. Now since they scan and make a 3d digital file from it I wonder if you could start with a 3D file the "painting".

http://www.brushstrokesdirect.com/BrushstrokesWeb/BrushstrokesHome.aspx

Lunatique
07-30-2005, 11:12 AM
Oh man, Stahlberg's gonna get a kick outta this. . .. He was just talking about future advances in printing technology not long ago.

I don't know about full 3D. Maybe someting similar to sculpted relief, but nothing that raises too far off the surface.

paperclip
07-30-2005, 11:17 AM
Surely if you wanted the look of canvas, you would just....paint on canvas?

I can understand this for more expensive paintings, but it seems a little strange for digital artists to go down this route.

jmBoekestein
07-30-2005, 01:12 PM
I never knew they put those huge amounts of paint on for a reason. :surprised They did? Or was it just that, more paint.

Lunatique
07-30-2005, 01:22 PM
I never knew they put those huge amounts of paint on for a reason. :surprised They did? Or was it just that, more paint.

Impasto is one of the most wonderful things about traditional painting. You really need to look at some paintings with wonderful impasto brushworks to understand how beautiful it can be. Just look at Pino's paintings for example--he's really good at it.

jmBoekestein
07-30-2005, 01:46 PM
I just haven't been to so many musea yet, :), I went to Kroller Moller here in Holland once, fairly big and has great paintings by the masters.

It's about time I went again. But personally I love this about digital, the fact that it seems a window into something. :D I can't see impasto adding too much to that. (I doubt surfing the web for them will help?)

edit: Is it a technique? To use the scattering and absorbing properties of the paint to achieve more intricate colours? Beause if light were to be bouncing around enough it would light up the paint differently. :)

Lunatique
07-30-2005, 03:02 PM
jmBoekestein - You really should go look around more galleries and museums. You really have to see the impasto work in person to understand how powerful it can be, and how digital could never touch the magic of traditional painting in terms of texture, impasto, brushwork..etc. Maybe in the future, as Stahlberg said, we'll get there with digital, but for now, it's not even close. Maybe take a look at Morgan Weistling, Scott Burdick, Pino Daeni, and Jeremy Lipking's websites--these guys paint pretty thick, although when they photograph their works they use polarizing filters that flattens their paintings and cuts out the glare from the impasto brushworks.

It's sad that today's young people grow up thinking that digital is everything, when in reality, digital is but a tiny fraction of the whole wide world of creativity. Art existed for many centuries before digital was even invented, and the sheer amount of masterpieces produces in those hundreds of years DESTROYS the puny amount of digital works that's been produced in the last couple of decades. We have very very few digital artists that can really be called masters in the strictest sense of the word, but there are countless masters in the traditional art world.

I said in the d'artiste book that every single aspiring digital artist should try traditional painting too--to understand the roots of your craft and experience the pure physicality of it. Painting on a Wacom is nothing like real painting, and the act of painting traditionally--just the application of paint, the mixing of paint..etc is a different world of immersion. It won't necessarily make a better artist, but it'll make you a more well-rounded and experienced creative person.

An analogy in music would be: Computer musicians should try and learn an acoustic instrument. It's not because knowing how to play an acoustic instrument will make you a better composer or musician, but that having experienced the nuances, dynamics, textures, and playing technique of acoustic instruments will give you a deeper understanding of how sound can be created and manipulated. It'll make you a more well-rounded musician.

jmBoekestein
07-30-2005, 03:55 PM
Well I gotta say our experience as human beings is very tactile, I can easily remember how a wacom feels when working with it. I've tried some acrylics, and it's really fun to hold all the stuff in your hands and make something real. The expereince gives more affiniation for the work you are doing I think. I'm probably also allergic to square shapes, I really HAVE to move away from the screen sometimes. Canvas is far less 'linear' with curves and the tension of it.

I'll eventually fnd the chance to visit some artgalleries, but the local works here only have 'misstaken' impasto, not very fond of it. Not argueing against you, just haven't seen/remembered it properly yet.

I wonder if I'd enjoy traditional painting though, very annoying to look for an undo button and not find it while you're expectying to find it...neeeeeediiiing it. :) Trains the hand eye coordination I know., and it's resolution independant and so on. Heheh, would be a difficult step still.

Sulla
07-30-2005, 05:02 PM
After thinking about this I have emailed the company to see if they will make a "painting" for me if I can make a file in the format they need with the 3D and color information. I have been working at getting a very painterly feel in my images but I want the output to match:)

And you are right every one that does digital should go look and real paintings and learn how to make them also. It will bring a lot to your digital work.

mangual
07-30-2005, 06:08 PM
jmBoekestein - You really should go look around more galleries and museums. You really have to see the impasto work in person to understand how powerful it can be, and how digital could never touch the magic of traditional painting in terms of texture, impasto, brushwork..etc. Maybe in the future, as Stahlberg said, we'll get there with digital, but for now, it's not even close. Maybe take a look at Morgan Weistling, Scott Burdick, Pino Daeni, and Jeremy Lipking's websites--these guys paint pretty thick, although when they photograph their works they use polarizing filters that flattens their paintings and cuts out the glare from the impasto brushworks.

It's sad that today's young people grow up thinking that digital is everything, when in reality, digital is but a tiny fraction of the whole wide world of creativity. Art existed for many centuries before digital was even invented, and the sheer amount of masterpieces produces in those hundreds of years DESTROYS the puny amount of digital works that's been produced in the last couple of decades. We have very very few digital artists that can really be called masters in the strictest sense of the word, but there are countless masters in the traditional art world.

I said in the d'artiste book that every single aspiring digital artist should try traditional painting too--to understand the roots of your craft and experience the pure physicality of it. Painting on a Wacom is nothing like real painting, and the act of painting traditionally--just the application of paint, the mixing of paint..etc is a different world of immersion. It won't necessarily make a better artist, but it'll make you a more well-rounded and experienced creative person.

An analogy in music would be: Computer musicians should try and learn an acoustic instrument. It's not because knowing how to play an acoustic instrument will make you a better composer or musician, but that having experienced the nuances, dynamics, textures, and playing technique of acoustic instruments will give you a deeper understanding of how sound can be created and manipulated. It'll make you a more well-rounded musician.

Edited: Ah, nevermind -- I meant to say:

Robert Chang, how old are you? You're like the Yoda of CG Talk. In a good way.

Lunatique
07-31-2005, 05:17 AM
mangual - Actually, Leonard is the cgtalk Yoda. Haven't you seen his avatar? :D

I'm 32--not that old really. I've been working as a creative person professionally for about 14 years, spanning several different creative mediums and industries (comic books, illustration, video games, CG animation, music, film, photography..etc. You can find out all the details at my website). One of the reasons I created this forum was to help educate the younger CG artists because many of them have no clue about traditional art techniques and theories, and it shows in their work in a negative way. Not all of the cgtalk Forum Leaders thought this forum was a good idea, and some were against it. But in the end Leonard agreed that we needed one. I asked Stahlberg and Linda Bergkvist to join me because I respect them as artists and also as people, and I think they feel the same way I do--that the younger generation of CG artists need some guidance. If you look at the sticky threads we worked so hard on, you'll see an incredible wealth of knowledge collected for the sole purpose of educating and inspiring CG artists that lack traditional knowlege and foundation. Since I created this forum, I'm pretty much responsible for overseeing it--maybe that's why I give off that Yoda vibe. Trust me, I'd rather not be a Yoda though--I'm still learning myself, and have much more learning to do.

Stahlberg
07-31-2005, 06:27 AM
Hey, you're right, I do get a kick out of that link! Wicked cool... :)

Impasto is a really effective and wonderful way to add texture to a painting, I used to use it myself whenever I could. It brings pleasant associations and sense-memories to anyone who's ever painted, or even simply played with mud, or spread butter. It seems to speak to something in our sense of touch; sensual and satisfying on a primal level.

Peddy
07-31-2005, 08:47 AM
i just got a funny idea of printing cel-shaded art using that technology! wierd stuff that would be.

still, great link! 3d printing (creation/'printing' of physical 3-dimensional products, usually inputted in something resembling a cad format) is itself sweet, but this is something different entirely.

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