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View Full Version : Insane perspective drawing - how?!


tevih
07-29-2005, 04:44 AM
I'm sure a lot of you have seen these images before:

http://users.skynet.be/J.Beever/pave.htm

How did this guy get those crazy perspectives?! How would one go about planning something that?! And is there a name or study of that type of drawing/style/perspective?!

Gots me boggled!! :argh:

danielh68
07-29-2005, 04:51 AM
I'm boggled, too. Jaw-dropping work.

sphere
07-29-2005, 04:59 AM
I had heard and assume it's done using a camera and plotting out the points onto the pavement. Then just painting with the camera or markings as a guide, which would make for alot of exaggerated shapes on the pavement.

Stahlberg
07-29-2005, 06:24 AM
Yeah, I'd do it in a similar way: take a photo of the empty pavement from the position I want it to look most real, go home and paint on it in Photoshop until I have my finished image, print that out... then use the Perspective transform to flatten the image as if seen from above, trace the important lines and print it out with a grid overlaid, then go to the pavement with chalk, some thread and tape, and those 2 printouts, and using the grid transferring the line drawing, then filling in with colors.

spnhead
07-29-2005, 06:59 AM
http://www.counton.org/explorer/anamorphic/


spnhead

DrFx
07-29-2005, 03:49 PM
If I were to do that, I would cheat: Take a slide projector to the intended viewpoint, paint over the projection.
That work is impressive, though, especially the Coke bottle!

ThePumpkinKing
07-29-2005, 09:14 PM
Yeah, I'd do it in a similar way: take a photo of the empty pavement from the position I want it to look most real, go home and paint on it in Photoshop until I have my finished image, print that out... then use the Perspective transform to flatten the image as if seen from above, trace the important lines and print it out with a grid overlaid, then go to the pavement with chalk, some thread and tape, and those 2 printouts, and using the grid transferring the line drawing, then filling in with colors.

I don't even think it's really that complicated. All you really have to do to acheive that perspective is draw something on the sidewalk, look at it from the proper angle, redo it and refine it so the sidewalk drawing looks right. After that, you just shade it. It takes a long time, but the point of those is probably to challenge himself.

tevih
07-29-2005, 10:29 PM
It's got to be annoying like heck to be painting something and not be able to see it while you're painting...

AKDesigns
07-29-2005, 10:49 PM
its not a new concept... they do things like that for logos on football fields or other sports or similar events....

logos for sponsors appear as perfect squares on ur screen on the camera viewport, but u know that if u were down on the pitch looking at it, it would be skewed as hell...

Stahlberg
07-30-2005, 04:04 AM
All you really have to do to acheive that perspective is draw something on the sidewalk, look at it from the proper angle, redo it and refine it so the sidewalk drawing looks right. After that, you just shade it.

I seriously doubt that's practical... these anamorphic things always seem to get the perspective lines perfect. I don't think it's about challenging themselves, not with regards to how the initial drawing is done anyway. Not when it's so relatively easy to use the grid system to transfer the drawing (everyone who creates big grafitti or big signs or murals uses some variant of transfer from a smaller original).

mangual
07-30-2005, 04:39 AM
Personally I had never seen such a thing before and rather than try to downplay it or minimize the artwork like others do, I would like to say it was impressive. Seeing things like that is what makes me happy to know the world has artists.

umbrellasky
07-30-2005, 10:27 PM
Those are pretty cool.
I think the technique is similar to how some of the renaissance artists used to paint. A lot of their work was for churches and cathedrals so went high up on ceilings and walls so they had to use a for-shortening ( I think that's the right word) technique so that the image would look great up on the ceiling but when you took it down you can actually see how they have stretched the image.

It's all sort of a trick on perspective :)

SheepFactory
07-30-2005, 11:00 PM
Personally I had never seen such a thing before and rather than try to downplay it or minimize the artwork like others do, I would like to say it was impressive. Seeing things like that is what makes me happy to know the world has artists.

Seriously , you'd think every 6 year old with a chalk and photoshop can do that from some of the responses in this thread :rolleyes:

heythatreallyhurts
07-30-2005, 11:12 PM
I think he might actually be using the lines on the pavement as guides (check out how some of the images line up). They could function sort of like a readymade grid, and he could just distort the perspective of any drawing using the grid. I honestly don't think he's using Photoshop and a projector or any kind of intricate preparation, though, however he achieves it.

GeoGraphiX
07-31-2005, 03:10 AM
If seen his work like 1 year ago,its simply unbeleeveble,and works only from 1 angle,
looking ad it from other side simply dont make sence,and yes he is allways preparing,or adleast dit something to figguer out how he is going to approuche it,
line of grid is a very old methode,when his doing old art drawings of formal artists i think he adleast use some form of a imagionary grid or adleast something that comes close to it.
He dint use the pavement as real grid looking ad 1 picture whit the gold piles.
plus on the self portred.
He is simply a great thinker,what can i say hehe.

AKDesigns
08-01-2005, 12:36 PM
Seriously , you'd think every 6 year old with a chalk and photoshop can do that from some of the responses in this thread :rolleyes:

like WHO's sheep factory? Just cos ur impressed by something doesnt mean everybody else is.... its nothing new... like i said before.... he watched the worldcup, saw the football pitch and thought cool idea....

the technical ability involved is just as talented as any 2d or 3d pieces i have seen around this forum... i think u guys may be getting carried away with some gimmicks...

mangual
08-01-2005, 01:02 PM
AKDesigns,

Of course people know that just because you are impressed by something not everyone else is going to share that opinion. Are you pretending to educate us on that fact or just being condescending or both? How about this: Keep your negative attitude to yourself and try putting your energy to good uses instead.

If being unimpressed by something that others admire makes you feel more confident or evolved than the rest of us -- knock yourself out. Go to the WIP and CG Choice gallery right now and start posting every time something fails to impress you. Then after a few days of doing that please come back here and let us know if you feel any better.

But if that seems like a big waste of time, there's always that thing about putting your energy to good use instead.

AKDesigns
08-01-2005, 09:55 PM
AKDesigns,

Of course people know that just because you are impressed by something not everyone else is going to share that opinion. Are you pretending to educate us on that fact or just being condescending or both? How about this: Keep your negative attitude to yourself and try putting your energy to good uses instead.

If being unimpressed by something that others admire makes you feel more confident or evolved than the rest of us -- knock yourself out. Go to the WIP and CG Choice gallery right now and start posting every time something fails to impress you. Then after a few days of doing that please come back here and let us know if you feel any better.

But if that seems like a big waste of time, there's always that thing about putting your energy to good use instead.

hey, before u go admin but kissing, i never said that this was unimpressive.. my first post stated that it is not a new concept merely... it seemed like sheep factory was saying we should all be in awe of this, when i didnt think it was necessarily true... i do think it is very impressive, but, yet again, its not a revolutionary idea...

when i look through the cgtalk wip and finished forums, i am just as in awe by the quality of work there.. thats all i was trying to say

GeoGraphiX
08-02-2005, 12:30 PM
AKDesigns,you came out wrong,and harsh,and simply dint had no taste in what you sayt,
you should leave everybody in there own state of mind and contribute ad least whit one deasant reply,Keep things cool,
It dont has nothing to do whit asz kissing,every topic on its self,is a worthwile to stand still about it,im learning lots of things by bullshit topics to:)

phoenix
08-06-2005, 07:06 AM
I think wether revolutionary or not but this guy did something really impressive .... and as far as the football field is concenred. its people like these whose art derives the mainstream market.

Regards

pentaphobe
08-08-2005, 01:55 PM
hey thanks! I came across some of these before, but as anonymous images on a communal web-space. nice to finally know the origin :)

Surely the fact that the technique is "simple" and "nothing new" doesn't detract from the quality of the work?
most of the techniques used by (some quite amazing) artists - both new and old - have been done before, but like with music; the art is in what you do within the confines of structures and techniques. (or creative use of punctuation... :rolleyes:)

oh - and I've hear through the grapevine that people use pieces of string to establish perspective in these and other mural styles.

macievelli
08-08-2005, 07:33 PM
Hi people, been a while since I posted. (work work work) Anyways, there is another method that, while neither simple nor easy to perfect, is simpler than some of the methods mentioned previously.

Take your original image. Draw a grid over the image with lines intersecting at specific intervals (1"x1", etc.) Then, to change the perspective of the image or to stretch it out considerably, reproduce the grid and elongate the grid vertically or horizontally or both. The more distorted you want it, the longer or wider you make your squares as you move from top to bottom or left to right (i.e. first sqaure is 1"x1", last one is 6"x6") Then, reproduce your original image using the grid as your guide (i.e. this line connects to this line at this point of the grid square, etc.) until the general image layout corresponds to the original layout within the grid.

If you have your original image, by doing this you don't end up needing therapy by focusing on perspective distortion and image warping...you focus on reproducing what is in each square of the grid, and you will distort it accurately.

I've used this method to produce a "folded out" look on a painting, and it works rather well and is quite accurate. It can also be used to reproduce images without distortions.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v322/macievelli/distort.jpg
In order: original image, original with grid, distorted grid, image after reproduction within distorted grid.

Of course, to get the right viewing angle of some of these sidewalk images, you would need to pick your viewing point and work out the distances for the distortions that way, but I still think it would be considerably easier and more accurate.

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