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danielh68
07-28-2005, 07:46 PM
Someone mentioned that I should do an introduction to color theory. Color theory is really complex and I only understand a smidgen of it. Nonetheless, itís enough for me to get by. Here are some tips:

I like the Munsellís Color wheel instead of the standard color wheel. My reasoning is not based on hours of research or anything scientific, itís just the Munsellís wheel seems prettier Ė specifically itís complimentary systems. For instance, the typical compliment to red is green, but with Munsell, itís red to blue-green. I find this combination much more visually appealing.

To start, I usually pick one of three different color schemes:

Analogous
Complimentary
Grays
Analogous colors are neighboring colors on the wheel. For example: red-yellow, red, red-purple. However, I decide I want my work based on a green-yellow, green, blue-green scheme (below).


http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/color1.jpg

Then, I base my painting from the color scheme and the end result is something like this:

http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/color2.jpg


Complimentary colors are opposite colors on the wheel. For example: red and blue-green. With that in mind, I decide to base my work on a blue and yellow-orange complimentary scheme (below).

http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/color3.jpg


Then, I base my painting from the color scheme and the end result is something like this*:


http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/color4.jpg


Grays are either colors that have been lightened or darkened with black, white or the colorís compliment. The colors are earthy and dull (but in a good way). They can create some powerful moods. I decide I want my work based on a warm red and cool green scheme.


http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/color5.jpg


Then, I base my painting from the color scheme and the end result is something like this:


http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/color6.jpg


I know this is short, but I only had three hours to do the sketches and tutorial. Hopefully you will find this helpful.



Best Regards,

Dan

yAdam
07-28-2005, 08:36 PM
i know a little about colour theory. but this has helped me immensly! Seems like a little knowledge can go a long way. Thank you daniel. :thumbsup:

ravioli_rancher
07-29-2005, 12:56 AM
Dan,

Dazzling work for only three hours. I'd never used Munsell's color theory before, but, of course, now I'll be flooding my papers and pixels with it. Many Many Muchas Graciases. :bounce:

Since somebody requested this one, I think somebody else should request a tutorial on composition lines from you. :D But not me. I think you should take your time and make a giant flapjack sized PDF or .swf or .avi showing you painting a 2500 x 2500 image from start to finish. :applause: Complete with a keystroke by keystroke addendum. :bounce: :buttrock:

Or tips on composition would be fine too. :)

Three for Three! :applause:

ceresz
07-29-2005, 07:11 AM
thank you so much, this helped me alot:thumbsup:

Bandicoot
08-02-2005, 02:30 AM
I find that sometimes the best thing to do is to ignore the tradional methods and try some off combo's. You can really get some great alien, and ethereal results if you skip off the beaten path. Of course, you can also get some really gross results as well :) so it's a mixed bag. Trial and error.

danielh68
01-09-2006, 02:42 PM
I was asked to submit a color wheel, so here it is. Initially, I used it quite a bit; but after so long it leaves a permant impression on your skull and, as a result, one isn't nearly dependent on it. In any case, I created this color wheel in Photoshop because (to my knowledge) PS7 (which I use) doesn't contain a color wheel palette. As I would start a painting, I'd open this file and drag it over to my reserve monitor for color picking. Sometimes, I would create files of the same palette, then I'd use hue/saturation on each to varying degrees to develop a library of nice grey tones.

Again, when I would start a painting, I would first determine some criteria (such as the stuff above.) I would look at the subject and then at the color wheel and ask myself "Should I use a complimentary, analogous, muted/gray, cool or warm, etc.?"

On a side note, some list the primary colors of the wheel as Red, Blue and Yellow. For many reasons I can't get into now, I prefer the Cyan, Magenta and Yellow configuration.

Anyhow, I hope this is helpful.

http://www.danielhelzer.com/color/color_palette.jpg

Mu
01-10-2006, 07:23 AM
Anyhow, I hope this is helpful.

it was indeed, thanks very much!

Also, I would like to point out that besides explaining and clarifying color choices in general in a great way this tutorial was very enlightening about your own work in particular which has a very unique feel about it.

:applause:

DDS
01-10-2006, 10:34 AM
Hey thank you for this. Some nice color sketches you got there. It looks like you have the color wheel exam passed man! :D

By the way, what's your theory about choosing a color scheme, before going for the complimentary/analogous? I mean...when do you choose the red, or the blue?

Rebeccak
01-10-2006, 02:04 PM
Thanks, danielh68! Great tut! :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

danielh68
01-10-2006, 04:22 PM
Rebeccak - you're welcome :)

DDS - Thanks. Concerning your question about my method of choosing colors...well, I don't know for sure. It really depends on your idea and what you wish to accomplish.

For instance, I did this quick sketch (below) and, while it was in its line stages, I decided I wanted to surround the Sultan's daughter with an air of mystery. Since the night is more mysterious than the day, I chose a night-time setting. Purple is also a mysterious color, so I thought I would build my palette around purple and it's neighboring hues. From there, I decided to illuminate the balcony with a complimentary color (opposite on the color wheel). Then I went about with pressure sentive pen and dashed some like on the faces, ornaments and such.

You may notice that yellow is the true compliment of purple and, in my piece, I use an orange. It's okay to bend the rules and be flexible. In this case, temperature played a part in my decision making: yellow is just too warm for a night-time scene. It would be a bit jarring and ruin the mystery of the piece. Yet, orange is still along the complimentary guideline and, while warm, is cooler than yellow and engenders the feel I'm looking for.

Mr. Mu - glad I can help :thumbsup:


http://www.danielhelzer.com/sketches/sketch86.jpg

DDS
01-10-2006, 04:45 PM
wow meng, this is what I call a tip :thumbsup: Thank you.

How do you add so good texturing to your pieces? Just some textures with multiply blending mode on top, and then playing with them? or do you actually use brushes and paint all that?

L.Rawlins
01-10-2006, 05:26 PM
When I read 'colour theory' in the thread title, I thought this would contain some information about the theory of feelings/moods implied through the use of specific colours in art, which is an area I am quite interested in exploring. Perhaps 'Quick Color Wheel Tutorial' would be a more accurate title for this content... :shrug:

Just a thought. :)

Some nice examples here. I would be quite interested to here more about this 'Cyan, Magenta, Yellow' perspective, should the thread author find the time.

Any furthur reading that you (or infact anyone) could recommend on Colour Theory and our interpretation/reaction of/to it?

Thanks. :)

danielh68
01-10-2006, 06:23 PM
L.Rawlins - I understand your point. This was sort of a quick thing for me to do, due to a couple of requests. I didn't put too much thought into the title.

As far as reading, my favorite "Color" book is: Color Theory Made Easy. It's geared for the traditional artist but is applicable to digital art as well. It deals more with the theory of mixing paints. However, if you're looking for something dealing with the symbolic and emotive purposes of color, you might have to look elsewhere. In any case, Thanks for the feedback :)


DDS - you're welcome:) I did this tutorial awhile back ago on texture. It might be of interest to you:

http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=262309&highlight=texture

GeekAnimator
01-10-2006, 08:10 PM
When I read 'colour theory' in the thread title, I thought this would contain some information about the theory of feelings/moods implied through the use of specific colours in art, which is an area I am quite interested in exploring. Perhaps 'Quick Color Wheel Tutorial' would be a more accurate title for this content... :shrug:

"Colour Theory" is the accurate title for this material, though.

Sept13
01-15-2006, 08:04 AM
Thanks danielh68! I myself also had only little experience of color theories, this cleared up quite a bit for me. I wouldn't mind if you did a grande color theorie tutorial too ;)

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