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View Full Version : How to pick a proper Power Supply?


Maven
07-19-2005, 09:03 PM
So, I have been picking out my components for the last couple of days and now I need to pick up a new PSU because the one I have now I don't think is going to cut it.

So How do I go about picking the right one?
and what does "Dual 12+V" mean? Do I need it?

Here my specs so far:

Epox EP-9NPA+ Ultra
Athlon 64 3500+ Venice
Corsair XMS 400 two 512-MB
eVGA Geforce 6800GT

and this is the PSU that I was looking at...but I'm not sure about it.

Enermax Noisetaker EG495-P 485 Watts - it's 90 bucks at newegg - too much???

Thanks for the help....

Valkyrien
07-19-2005, 10:10 PM
well, the topic has been covered to death recently here, so for more depth go on a search. Suffice it to say, brand does matter in this case. Can't go wrong with Antec TruePower:)

SweetDreamz
07-20-2005, 01:34 AM
That looks like a fine PSU...didn't go check on it...so much stuff to do.

And $90 is not expensive...lower middle rangeish.

Maven
07-20-2005, 03:04 AM
what does "Dual 12+V" mean? Do I need it?

I didn't find anything about this part of my question when I searched.

thanks.

lots
07-20-2005, 05:57 AM
This is a different way of building the PSU (referring to the "dual 12V rail" from above).

Think of it this way. In older traditional PSUs you had one "plane" or one 12V rail. This meant that when you plugged things into the system, they all drew power from this one plane. Meaning you had to have a big beefy PSU to deliver the required power.

Potentially this is more hazzardous to people on larger PSUs, so companies started to divvy up the power. They created multi plane PSUs which pretty much function like many smaller PSUs.

So in the case of this dual 12V PSU, each 12V rail can deliver some ammount of power to the system, and everything isnt drawn off of just one place. There's no real big advantage to split plane vs single plane really. Its just how people are building the things now adays. Though ocasionally, with the split plane PSUs you have to be careful that you do not overload one plane and leave the other completly unused. Such a problem does not exist in single plane designs

Maven
07-20-2005, 01:21 PM
Thanks Lots! I understand that now, so if there is no advantage to picking a PS with dual 12v then what would one look for when choosing a particular one? Because two different 500W PSU can very in cost.

I just want to get the right one for the job.

Thanks again.

TheCleaner
07-20-2005, 01:35 PM
i recommend you head over to this forum.. very useful.. and if you ever feel the need to check your psu is keeping it voltages.. check my sticky [/shameless plug]

http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/forumdisplay.php?f=231

lots
07-20-2005, 02:57 PM
When looking for a PSU, look at ones with high amperage on each rail, along with enough watt delivery to power all your devices. There are various charts and caculators out there that determine how much watts you really need for your system, googling probably will get you some. Also, you want to make sure you pick a powersupply with over voltage protection, in case you do have a surge, or what have you. This will protect the system (hopefully) in the case of a surge.

Brand is actually a big thing in PSUs. Antec, PC Power and Cooling, and a few others are pretty good companies to buy from. They make stable, clean PSUs that should last you. And generally speaking a good PSU usually costs up around $200 (should you need the absolute best). Of cource you could always go for Antec which is generally a good price/performance ratio (at around $60-$110 for thier PSUs).

Maven
07-20-2005, 03:16 PM
i recommend you head over to this forum.. very useful.. and if you ever feel the need to check your psu is keeping it voltages.. check my sticky [/shameless plug]

http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/forumdisplay.php?f=231

Thanks for that link, it's very useful.

When looking for a PSU, look at ones with high amperage on each rail, along with enough watt delivery to power all your devices. There are various charts and caculators out there that determine how much watts you really need for your system, googling probably will get you some. Also, you want to make sure you pick a powersupply with over voltage protection, in case you do have a surge, or what have you. This will protect the system (hopefully) in the case of a surge.

Brand is actually a big thing in PSUs. Antec, PC Power and Cooling, and a few others are pretty good companies to buy from. They make stable, clean PSUs that should last you. And generally speaking a good PSU usually costs up around $200 (should you need the absolute best). Of cource you could always go for Antec which is generally a good price/performance ratio (at around $60-$110 for thier PSUs).

Thanks for your thoughts, lots. I think I will check out either OZC and Antec.

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07-20-2005, 03:16 PM
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