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Enayla
07-17-2005, 05:29 PM
The rivers and eddies of hair

http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/final.jpg

Painting hair isn't, obviously, like painting a face. Doing a tutorial on it is a wildly different experience than a face tutorial. Why? A hair doesn't have any static features. There is no way of telling you where to place a strand of hair the way I can tell you where the nose goes. There's no anatomy of it, except that it has a certain weight and is likely to fall a certain way, and even that you can mess with because there is hair spray and gel and whatever else you might stick in it (blood or whatever, haha).

So. I've done the best I can. I've worked on this for a fair while (longer than I'd like to admit) and now I've finally added the finishing touches. This tutorial is for you guys, you CGtalkers. I'll add it to my homepage later for posterity (along with my other tutorials there), but it's dedicated to this wonderful community, and I'm hoping others will join in and keep this particular corner of CGtalk alive and kicking.

Throughout the tutorial you'll see some little tips and tricks added to the actual instruction pictures. Some of them are the brushes I'm using, some are tips directly related to the painting of hair, and some are just thoughts I thought I'd add as I went along.

http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/1.jpg

Instructions: The first thing you need to do is to decide on the colour of the hair. This hair will be brownish, but with a wee touch of gold in it. The darkest colour I'll pick for it is nearly black. This is usually true of ALL hair colours - even the lighter blondes where you'll end up painting over a lot of the dark tone, but it's still better to have it there underneath than to go too light. Once the colours are picked (make it one highlighter, two midtones and one shadow), just block in the shape of the hair.

Important: WORK ON A LARGE CANVAS. I can't possibly stress this enough - if you're going to do really nice hair, work big. If you're putting it into a full-body image and you don't think you can work big enough... eep, wrong: work big and then shrink it down to fit into the rest of the picture.

Common mistakes:
Starting out with a bright colour and then spending the rest of the time trying to darken it down with shadows. I can't stress enough how much it helps to do it the other way around. With skintones, it's best to start with a midtone, but with hair -- it's always helpful to begin dark. And the biggest mistake of all: not realising that hair really needs a level of detailing that 500x500 pixels won't give you. If you want this level of detail (not necessary, really, but if you do) work much bigger than that.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/2.jpg

Instructions:
What's done next is the blocking in on the large locks of hair. Just smoothly sketch in where you figure the strands will fall. The trick is to think of the hair not as a lot of individual strands at this point, but of it as thick sections that you will later work to detail down into individual strands in places. Pick colours at your leisure - starting out with the two midtones that you chose. No highlighting at this point.

Common mistakes:
A lot of people start painting hair by painting the strands. Some won't even block it in, initially, but start frantically sketching in strand after strand on top of each other. The end result of this will often look like a clump of straw pulled together. Hair naturally separates into locks. It's really, really hard getting this result if you're not painting it in sections - you'll have to somehow, miraculously, paint every individual strand and somehow get them to flow in the right directions.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/3.jpg

Instructions:
Pick a spackled brush now and try the clumps of hair out. What I mean by that is that you sketchily paint over the hard edges of the individual locks and just get a feel for how the locks will end, if they'll curl up a little and just the general 'feel' and 'flow' of the hair. Since there aren't, like I mentioned earlier, any static features of a hair it is so easily affected by the environment around. It's pretty good if you get the flow of it down right at this point.. From hereon, there will be detailing, and detailing, and detailing and if you realise later that you messed it up here, you will be more than a bit peeved.

So just get a feel for it. See if it falls all right considering the wind, the general look and check if you're actually happy with the hairstyle.

Common mistakes:
Not considering the wind - a skirt blowing in one direction, for instance, and the hair in the other. Not considering the weight of the hair (short hair often being fluffier, long hair heavier) or the effect that items might have on it (tiara weighing it down, ribbon pulling it up).


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/4.jpg

Instructions:
This is where the fun starts. You can now begin thinking about the fall of the light, the effects of colours around the hair (I'm making this easy for myself, the background is pretty much the same tone as the hair, but if it hadn't been I would have had to consider it here) but most of all just smoothing out the hard blocks of hair and giving it some smooth nice flow. I've got a perfect brush for this. When I just want to quickly smooth the hair out, I'll use a regular round brush with soft edges, but if I want to give the locks of hair semi-sharp edges in places... I can be clever and use a brush that has one side that's sharp and one that's soft (as seen in picture). Try making one, it's awesome.

Try starting to break up the blocks - into smaller sections while still keeping the bigger ones. Not as easy as it sounds.

Common Mistakes: Just painting over the blocks of hair. Big no-no. We still need the blocks, it's just that we're adding some more.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/5.jpg

Instructions:
Continue to both soften the hair AND break the blocks of hair up. Since we have those individual sections flowing in different directions, it will already start looking like 'hair' at this point. Continually use only soft-edged brushes and don't care if the result looks too-smooth or smudgey at this point. It won't later. Don't forget that the different locks of hair will have impact on each other. Where they meet, they might either shadow one another or merge together.

Common mistakes:
Starting to draw in individual strands already. I know it's a bitch to wait for so long - the detailing is the fun part - but when it comes to hair, there's really no rushing ahead.

(continued)

Enayla
07-17-2005, 05:30 PM
http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/6.jpg

Instructions:
Now. Here's the real trick. Even though we'll detail the entire hair, there's no need to super-detail all of it. Pick out one lock that will receive the most attention. Everything you do to the entire hair, you'll do twice as much to this strand. The texture and detail level of this one lock will have major impact on the rest of the picture even without everything else being quite so detailed. Just trust me on this one.

I'll pick the lock falling down along the side of her head. Once you've got a lock singled out, use a spackled brush and veeeery light pressure to softly follow the flow of the lock down to where it ends. Repeat over and over again in short strokes -- and keep your finger on the colour picker ( the alt key while you're using the brush) to use the right colour in the right place. This way, you will bring out the shape of the lock while keeping the separated, thinner sections The spackled brush will help to, even at this early stage, add some nice texture.

Common mistakes:
Unnatural fall. Take some time to study how hair actually falls. How the curls or locks wrap themselves and how they affect one another. Unless the hair is heavily styled with lots of hairspray and fussing, there are some things it generally won't do.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/7.jpg

Instructions:
Stop a moment and take a look at what you've done so far. This is as good a point as any to really consider the curves of the hair because we're about to go into detailing, and it's hell and some more trying to change it much after that. A successful looking hair will have nice, clean, natural lines to it. Even wildly curly hair looks better if the locks flow and work well together, than if it looks like they're just lumped together randomly. Do a separate layer and follow the locks of hair with some brightly painted arrows. Are they all pointing in different directions? If they are, chances are you might want to adjust them unless you're painting hair in motion or some pretty unnatural looking hair.

If it's looking okay, repeat step 6 over the rest of the head.

Common mistakes:
Getting carried away with how fun it is to paint flowing hair. Yes, big bouncy hair is nice, but the eighties are over and gone (hopefully buried) and it's better to keep this in perspective, unless something over-the-top is what you're aiming for. Subtle is often far prettier than overdone.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/8.jpg

Instructions:
We're finally getting to the details. There's not really any 'trick' right here. What you do is make a new layer. You pick a normal, sharp edged round brush and you paint strands following the general shape of the locks you have. You use a dark colour to begin with. You pause, you smudge it a little with a spackled brush - still in the hair's direction... and then you paint new strands on top of it in a slightly lighter colour... pause, smudge... repeat. Keep picking colours from the hair underneath and make sure not to remove the general shapes you've already created - and since you're keeping all of this on a separate layer... feel free to erase away in places to bring forth the nice texturing you've already done underneath.

Because you've prepared and textured the hair so nicely already, there is no need to overdo this and you don't have to be so careful all over the place. The hair was already looking pretty nice before you got to this point.

Common mistakes:
Completely abandoning the shapes you've already set down. At this point, it's SO easy to fall back on the old 'every hair for itself' principle. These might be individual strands, but they SHOULD be moving in group. They should be together. Flowing in unison. One crossing over the other now and then and breaking each other up.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/9.jpg

Instructions:
Texture, texture, texture. Once the flow is done, it's all about the texture. A really, really nice way to accomplish that wild puzzle of strands that makes up a hair is to paint strand after strand after strand on top of each other, then on top of those on a new layer, strand after strand. Do up to five different layers with different colours, set them to different opacity, blur the strands individually either with smudge or with the blur tool and just keep at it.

Varying between a slightly bigger brush and a really small one, you'll trick the eye into seeing small strands even where there aren't any. Remember that one lock that will have super-details? Focus on that one.

Common mistakes:
Thinking that every individual strand has to be painted all over the head. When I say a lot of details are nice, I don't really mean that level of detail.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/10.jpg

Instructions:
All right. Flatten. Just flatten all the layers if you haven't already. Chances are you'll have way, way, way too many layers at this point. Then, on top of your neat, nice one-layered image, add a new layer and set it to soft light.

Now you're going to do something that likely looks weird, but it really adds to the effect when viewed from a slight distance. Pick a brush, almost any brush, and make it decently small. Then, pick a colour from the canvas - set it as your background colour and then pick another colour as foreground. Go into brush settings and set the pen pressure to colour, and... scribble. Just scribble over the hair, shifting colours as you go, using a low opacity on the layer, and adding texture and depth to the hair. If you use dark colours, you'll also add a nice amount of contrast that will help the realism along a fair deal.

Common Mistakes:
Just skipping the random texturing. It really helps to add life to hair even if it seems like pure madness, so don't leave it out.


(continued)

Enayla
07-17-2005, 05:30 PM
http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/11.jpg

Instructions:
Zooming out, you'll see that the hair looks really nice already. If you don't care to do that much more, you can stop here.

What I generally do at this point, though, is to fix the hairstyle. I've usually painted using the first clumsy blocked in shape and now that I can see the flow of the hair better, I'll go in and just fix the edges up. I'll push it in in one place and out in another, perhaps, so that the shape of it follows the locks I've painted. Using the trick of painting individual strands of hair on a separate layer and very lightly blurring or smudging them, follow the outline of the hair and add some 'frizz' to it. It still looks smooth and sleek but there's more life to it, now.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/12.jpg

Instructions:
For added effect, go to the edges of the hair and use a soft, nice brush to feather the ends of the locks. There's really no overdoing this unless you totally go mad with it, and if you use a nice, dark colour - some of it will look like nice shadows, and some of it will look like shadowed strands. If the hair is shoulder-long, as it is here, it really breaks up monotony of skin... and if the hair has bangs, please do something similar with the bangs but not quite as feathery - or the hair ends up having a slightly frazzled look.

Common mistakes:
Just leaving the hair blocky. Generally, the edges have already been softened up by now, but even so, give it a once-over just for safety's sake.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/13.jpg

Instructions:
I said something about super-detailing, didn't I? This effect is extremely difficult to get if you haven't followed the other steps, and if you haven't got a pretty good idea of how hair 'works'. If you're having a rough time of it, please find some photos to study - it will really help... or just set a mirror up next to the computer (hard if you've got short hair, like I do, but even short hair is helpful).

The trick is to use a really small brush and first follow the flow of the hair with light pressure, and then swerve out from it and across the other strands. This is what really makes a difference, and also what takes painstakingly much time. It's not necessary, I give you that, but the end result is really nice. These separate strands should always be made on layers of their own and carefully treated before they're flattened down. The big upside of doing the strands on individual layers is that you can lock the layer and they paint and shade the individual strands to fit into their surrounding environment. Treat them the way you did those large sections of hair, with shading according to how they fall and where the light is.

The other great bit about them being in separate layers is that you can erase, smudge, blur, and adjust your happy hearts out until they look just the way you want them to. This all sounds really serious, but it's not. It's just serious and difficult until you get the hang of how to do them, then they're pretty quick work.

Common mistakes:
Making too many of these errant strands and ending up with static looking hair... making them too obvious or too starkly contrasting, which generally just looks dumb, or alternatively not adding a single wayward strand of hair into an entire hairstyle, and ending up with something akin to a brand new Barbie-doll style.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/14.jpg

Instructions:
Finally, and yes, we're at the last couple of steps now, add a few more 'obvious' strands that fall across entire sections of hair. If you skip the previous step because it's just too much into tiny details that you feel you don't need, at least don't skip this one. It really, really adds to the look of a hairstyle with a few of these playful locks.

The trick here is to make it seem as if they're actually escaping from a larger lock of hair and just sort of floating out across the rest of the hair, perhaps tugged away by the wind. To add to the effect, a very faint shadow from the strand might fall across the rest of the hair, just making it more visible and also enhancing the appearance of it flying free.

Common mistakes:
Unless it's windy or you're painting a wild-haired person, these 'errant strands' won't be that many, that obvious or that big. This is one of those discreet kind of touches that really makes a picture - but like all those kind of touches, it can also break something.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/15.jpg

And now you're done, and I hope it was a little helpful :]

I'm going away over the week again, and just wanted to drop this by you guys in case you have some vacation time to spare for painting. Enjoy, have fun, and I hope you're having a gorgeous summer so far!

NOOB!
07-17-2005, 05:53 PM
crap..i missed the ice cream truck.

oh and great tut...hyper realistic

ThirdEye
07-17-2005, 05:53 PM
priceless advice as always :)

Lc
07-17-2005, 05:58 PM
yeah, thx , very realistic !!
Really good tuts ;)

CGmonkey
07-17-2005, 06:06 PM
Wow, Enayla, great stuff!

You are really, really educational.. Love your method of teaching!

Squibbit
07-17-2005, 06:20 PM
yea ok, that sounds easy enough...



.

Reality3D
07-17-2005, 06:35 PM
Much appreciated! :thumbsup:

ceresz
07-17-2005, 07:00 PM
Tack Linda!
En jävligt bra tutorial om jag får säga det själv:D

Nazirull
07-17-2005, 07:05 PM
Yet another priceless tutorial from the master.....

Looking at the flow of things...it is really saying something about that guy who said Enayla is just copying photos to make her paintings...

Great contribution...Linda....couldnt applaud it more.........

umbrellasky
07-17-2005, 07:07 PM
Fantastic Linda!! Very generous it's an honour to be able to learn from such an amazing artist.

Elsie
07-17-2005, 07:57 PM
Out of all your priceless tutorials Linda, this one is THE one I've been waiting for *glomps you" thank you so much! Maybe now I'll finally be able to go and eat ice cream ^_~ hair has been the blight on my pictures for many years.

PerfectBlue
07-17-2005, 08:16 PM
great tut! :bounce:

ThirdEye
07-17-2005, 08:53 PM
[plugged on the front page]

Mal de Ojo
07-17-2005, 08:58 PM
wow, thanks so much! I have to try it right now...but yours looks so good and realistic that I have already fail... kidding, very usefull, sure I will Improve with this.

gizmosart
07-17-2005, 08:59 PM
Tnx Linda the bast like allways...

bkboggy
07-17-2005, 09:14 PM
You are trully incredible! That is the best hair tutorial I've seen so far, and it's so "into-detail", I just love it! Thank you very much.

jdsb
07-17-2005, 09:18 PM
cute chick,great tut and so much ice cream...thanks for the nice tuthttp://www.cgtalk.com/images/icons/icon10.gif

TheCleaner
07-17-2005, 09:26 PM
i am loving all these tuts that are cropping up lately

jmBoekestein
07-17-2005, 09:36 PM
Love it too. :thumbsup:

Gotta save these to my hd, they're real handy especially for beginners. A lot of insight from your tutorials Linda.

Thanks for sharing so much of your knowledge! Very nice of you.

Goro
07-17-2005, 10:17 PM
wow thank you for sharing! I'll try that out some time.

Cheers!
Goro

Trower
07-17-2005, 10:18 PM
You have got to wonder at this artists nature... Many people in the industry who are competing professionally, can be almost secretive to the extreme when asked about their techniques...

Miss B, is a diamond... el brilliante...

I must admit that I've been fishing for a material tutorial for ages, like a petulant child who's asked to wait for something... the wait continues... and then finally something even more usefull comes along... Wow...

Enormous thanks to the best thing to come out of Sweden since the Koenigsegg CCR... Hey... the cars got nothing on her... but I think you'll agree... it's an impressive car...

Biggies to the Lady of Digital Fantasy Art...

Respectfully. :)

robin
07-17-2005, 10:24 PM
You never stop to amaze me, great work

what are you asking in return ?


BRAVO!


.

-NG-
07-17-2005, 10:29 PM
Thank you linda! for again a very informative tutorial.:thumbsup:

PixelFloss
07-17-2005, 10:37 PM
Linda, thanks very much for the amazing tutorial and congrats on the very lively text.

Nehym
07-17-2005, 10:53 PM
So very helpful and interesting to follow your tutorials Linda. Thank you once again for your time taken to put it together; it is much, much appreciated.

Have a good time this week-end away from home! :)

Dr. Ira Kane
07-17-2005, 10:54 PM
You are too good for us, thanks for this tutorial I just got my wacom so it's the best timing it could be, hair painting time :D!

Neil
07-17-2005, 11:05 PM
Thanks for kicking off this new push with a great tut!

mac666er
07-17-2005, 11:06 PM
Three letters: WOW

:bowdown:

mac

sic6six
07-17-2005, 11:37 PM
great tut.
as always youve out done yourself enayla

hushi911
07-17-2005, 11:47 PM
That is very good!:thumbsup:

Rosewarne
07-17-2005, 11:51 PM
i am loving all these tuts that are cropping up lately

lots of great teacher indeed :)

Rosewarne

marsyas
07-17-2005, 11:52 PM
Thank you for the great tips! It is very kind of you to share.

Bohemiantoe
07-17-2005, 11:53 PM
I LOVE this.
My friend in Sweden referred me to your personal page once, and that is what got me motivated to snag a wacom tablet :-) and take up digital art.
Thank you for the tutorials! :bowdown: In about 3 days, my first attempts at digital paintings improved like 100% because of your tuts.

Won't show anything yet, though. It is still inferior to everybody else's here....lol

Hana-chan
07-17-2005, 11:59 PM
thank you very much! this is very helpful! :bowdown:

Troy McClure
07-18-2005, 12:00 AM
Usefull?? That was incredible usefull I really need that! :love:
Thanks a lot:thumbsup:
Best hair tutorial ever.

ogar555
07-18-2005, 12:07 AM
*nods* yes... yes...
5 stars 5 stars! :scream:
Great tutorial, i'll try it out as soon as possible!
p.s
I love the way you draw hair!

HellBoy
07-18-2005, 12:20 AM
wow, enyla, another great tutorial

thanks

depleteD
07-18-2005, 12:36 AM
Thanks so much for doing this. I really appreciate the time u take out of your day to help this community out. THis is such a god send for me cause my teaches dont do shit for me.
YOU RULE!:bounce: TO THE MAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAX

rawgon
07-18-2005, 01:34 AM
yeah! how great, thanks and keep painting:thumbsup:

ja-fett
07-18-2005, 01:39 AM
adjectives fail me to complement your cool work. :thumbsup:

Kraull
07-18-2005, 02:31 AM
Flawless technique!

Oh, by the way, congratulation for your master and servant entry! Your work is defintely impressive!

:)

retsbabe
07-18-2005, 02:36 AM
thank you linda for this. much appreciated :) and congrats on winning the master & slave contest.. you were my 1st pick.

jingajo
07-18-2005, 02:53 AM
Thanks so much Linda! :) this will be so helpful

hhssuu
07-18-2005, 03:15 AM
Alsome tute really learnt a lot, thankyou so much, i loved it. :applause:

jcbray
07-18-2005, 03:20 AM
Hey :) I don't normally post much around here, but thanks for the tutorials. I'm one of those people you spoke of who usually ends up with a haystack ;) Progress must be made!

Thanks Linda :)

Lunatique
07-18-2005, 04:37 AM
Damn, Linda. That is intense. The way you paint hair makes me look lazy. I simplify mine so much.

Word of caution to people attempting this tutorial

If you are going to attempt Linda's tutorial, you really gotta have a lot of patience to paint in that style. It would also help if you are not an absolute beginner. Highly detailed yet aesthetically pleasing (unlike boring photo-rape) painting styles like Linda's comes from years of experience and hardwork. The tips she's given are essentially "secret ingrediences"--things that you would never have figured out unless you were told--like the layer properties, how to create textures in the hair..etc. If you don't succeed, just keep practicing. Hair is never easy. This painting style is highly advanced in terms of technique, so don't be hard on yourself if you can't achieve success right away.

On a seperate note--all you people in the past who doubted Linda and called her a cheat and a photo-rapist--if this tutorials doesn't prove that she's the real deal, then nothing will ever convince you. On the other hand, there ARE liars and cheats out there, and they absolutely do exist, so you shouldn't just take it for granted that everyone can paint like Linda. These people would have to prove themselves like Linda has.

nachogrande
07-18-2005, 05:12 AM
Another great tutorial. Thank you very much Linda.

luima
07-18-2005, 05:41 AM
Outstanding work!! i dont work a lot with 2d but this is inspiring, simply amazing!! i like your style a lot. good work!!!

io-d
07-18-2005, 06:07 AM
I Love you.... Did you know that??

monsitj
07-18-2005, 07:44 AM
geezz! linda! you do it again!! I still practice with your eye tutorial , and here is the new hair tutorial!! many many thanks to you , linda! very great and imformative tutorial! :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

madart
07-18-2005, 08:18 AM
Excellent tut, Linda! You've put a lot of work into it.

A very good idea to write a "common mistakes" paragraph like that. In my classes/courses/tutorials I've never written it separate like that. Nor have I seen it anywhere before either.

Will have to try your way of doing hair, you do get realistic results.

Trignom
07-18-2005, 08:37 AM
Great tutorial, awesome result.
Thank you, your description is simply enough for me to understand :)

DrFx
07-18-2005, 10:23 AM
Awesome, Linda! Thank you so much... again!

BTW, how are you enjoying your new workstation? :cool:

realfantasy
07-18-2005, 10:28 AM
Love you as always >///<
You are my idol.

Thanks again.
(Two tutorials in this short period... a bit hard for me to digest XD~)




What? who called Linda a liar and cheater? They must be JEALOUS of her talent.

mutou
07-18-2005, 10:36 AM
wonderful always!! like your work so much!:thumbsup: :thumbsup:

tinitus
07-18-2005, 10:42 AM
WOOOOOOOOW:love:

R-K
07-18-2005, 10:47 AM
I only managed to grab the ice cream..

nah, didn't try painting hair today. Nice looking tutorial, thanks a lot for sharing! Just gotta fake most of the detail, right?




Lunatique: I have never had doubts about Enayla's skills, just about taking shortcuts (which is understandable sometimes). But not to dwell on that, nobody has to prove their painting skills, but to really earn respect, it might be necessary.

buzzz3d
07-18-2005, 01:29 PM
Thanks for taking the time to create these tutorials Linda, much appreciated.
One question, in step 3, shouldn't the spacing for the speckled brush be lower than 25% or am I doing something wrong here?

Hawke
07-18-2005, 01:31 PM
Excellent, amazing to see the detail build up to the finished style. V informative and quite inspiring :applause:

sergioKomic
07-18-2005, 01:55 PM
Once again I bow down to your infinite artistic wisdom!:bowdown: :bowdown:

Skjoldbroder
07-18-2005, 02:21 PM
Gorgeous hair, and a good read. Love it Linda.

*off to get my tablet* :)

Enayla
07-18-2005, 02:34 PM
Thanks guys :)

I realise I should have warned that it is a fairly complicated tutorial, and not really one for beginners - it's best if you already know your way around Photoshop before tackling this one. Also, admittedly, this is the most complicated hair I've ever painted - I'm childishly pleased with it at the moment. I was hoping that, even if you're not aiming for an end result so ridiculously detailed (my big weakness, I just don't know when to let things go!) you'll still find something or other useful in the tutorial.

As for the 25% setting... I'm embarrassed to admit I usually use it for most of my brushes. It's partly just not bothering to change it, and partly because it fits my way of painting - I find it easier to apply pen pressure with a spacing set high than low. It might be that I'm still only using an Intuos 1 (boohoo), but I find that when I lower the spacing, I get annoyed because the strokes are too 'harsh'. Working in this large format, the slight unevenness of the 25% doesn't really show, especially not when you paint it over, and over again with different brushes.

Just nabbing a typical, sharp edged round brush, this is the difference of the result I get when using the same kind of pressure -- I just find the higher spacing setting more versatile.

http://www.furiae.com/images/25.jpg

I suppose most illustrators have some little thing they're stubborn about to the point of stupidity, and this is mine. I worked with this one fella at one time and he told me I was dumb for not using a lower spacing on most of my brushes, and I tried, I tried, but I ended up going back to this again.

Anyway, thank you so much, everyone - I'm just happy the tutorial is appreciated, and I hope it's some help to someone. I didn't do it to prove anything, please don't feel that - I've never felt I had anything to prove. I did it in hopes of helping the community in what small ways I can.

Enayla
07-18-2005, 02:35 PM
Argh, I must correct myself. The spackled brush doesn't have a 25% setting. I think it's got a 5%, force of habit made me write that. Must edit.

:goes to edit:

buzzz3d
07-18-2005, 02:38 PM
:)

We love you.

danielkenobi
07-18-2005, 03:11 PM
Txs enayla :scream: this is great, txs for sharing your knowledge with simple mortals like us.

HoangQuan
07-18-2005, 03:22 PM
Thank you so much Linda. You know, in the past, I used to draw like Manga, but now i feel so bored and I want to change my style, and your tuts really help me a lot.I can't say anything, but I really want you to know one thing: I always appreciate your tuts,thanks for sharing!!!

HoangQuan
07-18-2005, 03:26 PM
Thanks a lot! I always luv your tuts!

R-K
07-18-2005, 03:30 PM
now maybe I must make myself more plain of how I like this tutorial: I'm really thankful that someone takes time to do this stuff and help others.. and actually is able to really teach, not just show off. So thanks really much again, sorry if my earlier comment was slightly annoying.

PS. The face is wicked!

abourabe
07-18-2005, 03:41 PM
WOW great technique ! thnx very much enayla and congratulation for m&s you really worth more than that ..:thumbsup: thnx again .

Terro
07-18-2005, 04:28 PM
This is the second tutorial I seen from you and I'm looking forward to many more :) Thank you for a great lesson.

Keek em coming

--=leon=--
07-18-2005, 05:14 PM
this is the best hair tut i have found so far,
thanx a lot for your time.

cheers.

Squibbit
07-18-2005, 05:46 PM
i dunno ... i dunno how u do it, it's like this is not even close...

man , i gave it my all

http://www.saunalahti.fi/panuom/DaHair.jpg

SDIT
07-18-2005, 05:46 PM
thank you for sharing and for the effort!
The tutorial's great!


mauricio.

snwbrdn7
07-18-2005, 06:14 PM
Very cool tutorial. I am definately doing this one tonite.:thumbsup: Excellent work.

tAstyBITs
07-18-2005, 06:29 PM
great work. I wonder if you used photographs in any way when you made this image?

peekoot
07-18-2005, 06:44 PM
big big thanks! :) this is just what i had problems with (or not enough patience to discover clever ways to do it :rolleyes: )... excellent tutorial! thanks for the effort!

vikkie
07-18-2005, 07:05 PM
Thank you, now all i need is talent...ahem... you rule.

sidneyhop
07-18-2005, 08:43 PM
are you going to add this one to your web page? I love having all your tutorials in one place:)

Boone
07-18-2005, 10:27 PM
Hmmm. I like the app-indepentant tut!

I never really understood how all this digital-paint thing worked, but this has certainly shown me the real deal. I could do this in Paint Shop Pro...cool! :bounce:

pixelkeg
07-19-2005, 12:05 AM
Thank you for taking the time to put this tutorial together! It's very informative and well thought out

Cheers,
=pK=

starqueen
07-19-2005, 02:06 AM
thank you so much!

phospt
07-19-2005, 02:45 AM
Ooh, great stuff. Gonna read it again and then give it a shot. Thank you so very much!

tevih
07-19-2005, 02:48 AM
Great tutorial!! Thanks Linda - you're the best! :)

I've never used spacing before - I think I like it! Also, of course you weren't trying to prove anything with the tut! Thanks for sharing your [hard earned] knowledge with us! (What is there to prove after Expose 1, Expose 2, D'artiste, winning first place in Master & Servant challenge....?!) :scream:

p.s. - you're tut character looks like Catherine Zeta Jones :)

navate
07-19-2005, 03:29 AM
Oh, Linda. This one is just brimming with lovely goodies of knowledge :D *steals them all* I love how you go about showing things, throwing in little jewels of wisdom with each step. You're absolutely awesome for sharing your technique with everyone. <3

I've wondered how you managed such beautifully lifelike hair recently. I can figure out how you do most things just from having watched you for so long, but the hair really had me stumped. Particularly helpful since I'm pants at hair myself. :D I'll have to wait until my next image to use this, though--the one I'm working on now has an afro sort of thing going on, hahaha, so this isn't much help. XD Next time, though, my figure with have gorgeous flowing locks! You just wait. ;]

rwitzsche
07-19-2005, 04:16 AM
Just wanted to say your tutorials are awesome! I am learning so much from you - you totaly rock!! Keep em comming - though they must take a while to do!

Harafnir
07-19-2005, 04:52 AM
I just want to thank you for your tutorials, your images, your amazing fantasy and splendid compositions, a stupendosuly funny homepage, with some fantastic art and now these bombastic tutorials. You, singlehandedly, is pushing me back to the art of the pen, and away from the polygon. Not to try and achieve what you do, to become as good as you... But I have missed the joy you have, that shine from everything you do, the joy in painting, and in creating and sharing with others... I am gonna get a board myself and sit down with your tutorials and see if my old fingers can get back some of the skill they once had. It has been years... But if I only for five minutes can get all giddy over a few lines on a digital paper, then that is all that i am looking for.

Tack gumman. Du är en otrolig inspiration, hela du. Man blir varm av allt du gör.

turtle-rn
07-19-2005, 06:32 AM
Great tutorial, very educational and helpful; thanx alot for being so generous.

RealCapri
07-19-2005, 07:15 AM
Nice tutorials!!! Thanx a great deal Linda :)

sablebrush
07-19-2005, 09:15 AM
thanks! :eek: wonderfull :bounce: :applause:

shiwenzi
07-19-2005, 09:56 AM
Thanks~~~~I always can not paint hair well~~~I will go to try^^

ramairy
07-19-2005, 10:06 AM
this is amazing, keep posting this kind of valuable tutorials :thumbsup:

Danihel
07-19-2005, 10:37 AM
maybe you would like to make a vtm
i would love to see you in action (although it :sad:wont help my "croocked" hands)

anyway thanx for the tutorial it looks awesome

florian
07-19-2005, 10:39 AM
Thanks a lot for taking the time.

I'm just enjoying my ice cream :thumbsup:

Mirwen
07-19-2005, 01:20 PM
Whee... I love your sketches almost more than your finished work. This is really excellent tutorial. Thank you for sharing your knowledges.

fabricedelage
07-19-2005, 01:28 PM
excellent travail, un step by step extraordinaire. bravo

Alice
07-19-2005, 03:16 PM
Thanks for sharing Linda!
But do I really have to do all that to get an icecream...?

BernardoDelgado
07-19-2005, 03:31 PM
thank you so much linda, its an amazing tutorial and very helpful in my case. keep the good work =)

karlrickhunter
07-19-2005, 03:48 PM
a very big thank you for the tutorial, i am working on it.

eight272
07-19-2005, 04:08 PM
priceless advice as always :)

I couldn't of send it better myself...:thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Mike.H
07-19-2005, 05:32 PM
super tutorial Linda, thumbs up!

Freefall Omega
07-19-2005, 05:51 PM
thanks enayla.

it is a truly great painting aswell!!! i've never seen the soft brush and soft effects used so well.

offbeatworlds
07-19-2005, 06:01 PM
Thanks so much for the tutorial Linda. I've been playing around with hair for sometime, and you just helped my refine my technique a bit. Thank you!

One small request: Could you perhaps share the brushes you showed in the tutorial, because I'm having a problem capturing them. (I collect custom brushes like crazy, haha!) Thanks!

3d49sue
07-19-2005, 11:04 PM
Thanks so much for the tutorial -- I can't wait to try it!

Mephistoph
07-20-2005, 06:55 AM
Fantastic tutorial! You're a phenomenal artist. How would you do hair if it was wet? Remove most of the "loose" strands and add more highlights? If you don't have a million other things to do (which most likely you do), could you do a tut on hair in various states?


Thanks a feather load!

Meph

mikke
07-20-2005, 10:19 AM
can anyone tell me what program did she use to do that?

I'd love to give it a try..... i dont think is PS...right?

CarpeNoctem
07-20-2005, 11:21 AM
Ha, this should for once silence all those, who never believed that you can paint that photorealistic =).
Great tutorial. Thank you so much for sharing.

HoangQuan
07-20-2005, 02:07 PM
I tried it but I have a question: I don't have any spackled brush, and I don't know where to find or download them. I'd tried to create them myself but when I set spacing in 25% and draw, it doesn't smooth as I hope.:sad:
So Enayla or somebody else here can please answer my question?(cause' I've known and used P.s for a month)

theteuton
07-20-2005, 11:23 PM
The spackled brush is supposed to be used with spacing 5% i think, she made a mistake in the tutorial and already corrected it. So just change the spacing of the brush you already have to 5% and it should work out fine (that is what I did).

P.S. In case you dont already know, you change the spacing by clicking on the brushes tab on the upper right corner of photoshop, and then select brush tip shape and then there is a slider for brush spacing (its the bottom most setting there I believe).

Have fun :D

Healdria
07-21-2005, 11:31 AM
Wow!!! This tutorial is packed with goodness!!! Fun and thoughtful explainations made it so much easier to get into. Great Job, can't thank you enough for sharing this with us. And just a little side note, if the packground and foreground was in a very constracting colour scheme, under the same light source as this tutorial, would it be right to say that the colour of the background is reflected on the very contour of the hair and the foreground colour is reflected on the body and crown of the hair?

AWaqas
07-21-2005, 12:51 PM
Thanks Linda.. its an awesome tutorials. Perhaps we can see other simpler hair painting tutorial specially for beginners.. :)

Elaeria
07-21-2005, 01:03 PM
*phew* Wow Linda, this is beautiful. I'll add this to my collection of tutorials for sure! I still have a long way to go, but tutorials like this keep me going.:) You certainly set a high quality standard in this field! I really hope you are personally getting as much out of creating these tutorials for people to learn from as you do put into making them. You contribute so much, so selflessly. Thank you. :love:

Hope you had a good vacation at your cottage this week! It's certainly deserved.
Thanks again!
~Ela~

snowkiwi
07-21-2005, 05:05 PM
Linda, thanks again for treating us to another tutorial. The girl/woman is very pretty.

OrO
07-21-2005, 06:32 PM
slurp .....:drool: :drool:

K. Scott Gant
07-21-2005, 09:11 PM
Linda,

I just have to ask about the soft brushes compaired to the hard brushes. Is this how you mainly work with everything? Hard brushes? Even on skin tones etc etc? Do you go back afterwards and blend/blur?

I'm trying to do that now on some paintings and I'm not getting the feel for it yet. I guess being an airbrush guy from a long time ago I'm stuck in the soft brushing mode but I'd like to break out and try newer things.

Gord-MacDonald
07-22-2005, 12:32 AM
I am so happy you did this tutorial - hair is sooo hard to do. :thumbsup:

Gord

FrozenSun
07-22-2005, 01:36 AM
Great tutorial. I have been a fan of your work for a long time. Your great :thumbsup:

clandestine
07-22-2005, 04:02 AM
Wow, thanks! This tutorial really gave me a feel for how to render hair in that manner, and just reading it (haven't completely tried it out) helped me understand some technique.

Very much appreciated.

Lilith
07-23-2005, 04:53 AM
Thanks for the tutorial. What version of Photoshop do you use? I'm wondering if the brush will work the same way in the version 6, the one I have. I'm very lazy making brushes but I have to try the one with soft and hard edge in the same brush. :D

Peddy
07-25-2005, 06:28 AM
i have but one crit for this tutorial: tell me about the ice cream at the start, it would have been a nice compliment to a fantastic tutorial that makes me want to drop what im doing and paint.

Sanne-chan
07-25-2005, 06:07 PM
You have no idea how long I have been surfing the web, stalking...erm...asking other artists to make a tutorial on this. If I get Rich & Famous (you can all roll your eyes now ;)) someday, I'll tribute a painting to you :p

Peddy
07-26-2005, 04:18 AM
:rolleyes:

Maidith
07-26-2005, 12:14 PM
Enayla, I really appreciate your effort to make this tutorial. It is very helpful and I learnt some new things :)

An approach to paint realistic hair...
http://img328.imageshack.us/img328/6074/enaylahairsmall9vj.jpg

mikke
07-28-2005, 10:48 PM
can anyone tell me what program did she use to do that?

I'd love to give it a try..... i dont think is PS...right?



anyone?????

Squibbit
07-28-2005, 10:54 PM
photoshop dude



.

ceresz
07-28-2005, 10:55 PM
anyone?????

what I know,is that she uses PS:D
but hey, what do i know:D

Kkrishna
08-03-2005, 07:49 AM
It's really helpful. Thanks for putting this up.

everlite
08-07-2005, 03:36 PM
Hey,

I never new photoshop brushes could be so great, i always thought Painter was the app for such effects but it seems i was wrong. I've just created a few arty custom brushes for photoshop. If your interested you can head over to my site and download them:

http://www.thedaveidentity.co.uk (click on freebies at the bottom)

10 in total.

http://www.thedaveidentity.co.uk/brushes.jpg

This is all from one brush. (new to me 8-)

Now i must go and create something, makes ya feel like a kid with a bucket of paints 8-)

~ Dave.

Adina
08-16-2005, 05:45 PM
you did a really great tutorial- easy to understand and some very good and useful tips :) thanks a lot linda :)
i just had to try it ;9

http://img356.imageshack.us/img356/5160/51kc.jpg

Lync
08-16-2005, 11:38 PM
Nice image, Adina.

I've been struggling getting the effect I want with hair because I don't own a tablet...doh! (I get there eventually, it just seems to take longer than it probably should - and certainly seems more painful)

phospt
08-18-2005, 08:21 AM
Well, I did this a while ago and really meant to get back to it. I think I lost my steam. I figured I ought to post it anyhow. It was a blast and I learned a ton, Thank you!!
http://www.photoscreenprint.com/art/Hairtoday.jpg
Thankyou for sharing. Your the best!

chocolate198
08-21-2005, 02:27 PM
Cool !! thanks it helped me a lot :D

Enayla
10-28-2005, 10:35 AM
I just thought I'd say that after some pressure, I've added the tutorial to my website and it's available there, too, now (along with the other tutorials).

I am so happy my help was appreciated, and I can't stress enough what a big smile you guys put on my lips :D I'm sorry I took so long getting back to this.

I did this tutorial in Photoshop CS. I'm afraid I can't share the brushes anymore because the program crashed at some point and I lost most of them - I'm back to the basics again. If you guys still want the brushes though, just tell me and I'll try to duplicate the exact ones I used and upload them to my site.

Also, beautiful hairs you guys have painted <3 Lovely stuff.

hems4grafix
11-10-2005, 09:50 AM
http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/11.jpg

Instructions:
Zooming out, you'll see that the hair looks really nice already. If you don't care to do that much more, you can stop here.

What I generally do at this point, though, is to fix the hairstyle. I've usually painted using the first clumsy blocked in shape and now that I can see the flow of the hair better, I'll go in and just fix the edges up. I'll push it in in one place and out in another, perhaps, so that the shape of it follows the locks I've painted. Using the trick of painting individual strands of hair on a separate layer and very lightly blurring or smudging them, follow the outline of the hair and add some 'frizz' to it. It still looks smooth and sleek but there's more life to it, now.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/12.jpg

Instructions:
For added effect, go to the edges of the hair and use a soft, nice brush to feather the ends of the locks. There's really no overdoing this unless you totally go mad with it, and if you use a nice, dark colour - some of it will look like nice shadows, and some of it will look like shadowed strands. If the hair is shoulder-long, as it is here, it really breaks up monotony of skin... and if the hair has bangs, please do something similar with the bangs but not quite as feathery - or the hair ends up having a slightly frazzled look.

Common mistakes:
Just leaving the hair blocky. Generally, the edges have already been softened up by now, but even so, give it a once-over just for safety's sake.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/13.jpg

Instructions:
I said something about super-detailing, didn't I? This effect is extremely difficult to get if you haven't followed the other steps, and if you haven't got a pretty good idea of how hair 'works'. If you're having a rough time of it, please find some photos to study - it will really help... or just set a mirror up next to the computer (hard if you've got short hair, like I do, but even short hair is helpful).

The trick is to use a really small brush and first follow the flow of the hair with light pressure, and then swerve out from it and across the other strands. This is what really makes a difference, and also what takes painstakingly much time. It's not necessary, I give you that, but the end result is really nice. These separate strands should always be made on layers of their own and carefully treated before they're flattened down. The big upside of doing the strands on individual layers is that you can lock the layer and they paint and shade the individual strands to fit into their surrounding environment. Treat them the way you did those large sections of hair, with shading according to how they fall and where the light is.

The other great bit about them being in separate layers is that you can erase, smudge, blur, and adjust your happy hearts out until they look just the way you want them to. This all sounds really serious, but it's not. It's just serious and difficult until you get the hang of how to do them, then they're pretty quick work.

Common mistakes:
Making too many of these errant strands and ending up with static looking hair... making them too obvious or too starkly contrasting, which generally just looks dumb, or alternatively not adding a single wayward strand of hair into an entire hairstyle, and ending up with something akin to a brand new Barbie-doll style.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/14.jpg

Instructions:
Finally, and yes, we're at the last couple of steps now, add a few more 'obvious' strands that fall across entire sections of hair. If you skip the previous step because it's just too much into tiny details that you feel you don't need, at least don't skip this one. It really, really adds to the look of a hairstyle with a few of these playful locks.

The trick here is to make it seem as if they're actually escaping from a larger lock of hair and just sort of floating out across the rest of the hair, perhaps tugged away by the wind. To add to the effect, a very faint shadow from the strand might fall across the rest of the hair, just making it more visible and also enhancing the appearance of it flying free.

Common mistakes:
Unless it's windy or you're painting a wild-haired person, these 'errant strands' won't be that many, that obvious or that big. This is one of those discreet kind of touches that really makes a picture - but like all those kind of touches, it can also break something.


http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/15.jpg

And now you're done, and I hope it was a little helpful :]

I'm going away over the week again, and just wanted to drop this by you guys in case you have some vacation time to spare for painting. Enjoy, have fun, and I hope you're having a gorgeous summer so far!


hi this is hemant
from india it's really incredible...
amazing tutorial..
there is so many things to learn from this tutorial
wish you good luck for ur future..
thank you...

hems4grafix
11-10-2005, 09:53 AM
hi this is hemant
from india it's really incredible...
amazing tutorial..
there is so many things to learn from this tutorial
wish you good luck for ur future..
thank you...

LeadMagnet
03-04-2006, 05:19 PM
Hey, this is a fantastic tutorial. It's the best one i've seen for hair.


I'm a bit confused by the image in your second step http://www.furiae.com/images/hair/2.jpg
I don't understand what you mean. Could somebody please explain this to me?

I feel stupid for asking because i bet the answer is very simple.

Mu
04-12-2006, 09:29 AM
Hi,


thank you Linda (in case you ever read this, hehe) for this wonderful tutorial. I must say, in case it isn't painfully obvious from the rest of my painting, I am an absolute beginner, but I followed every step of the tutorial with artweaver (don't have PS) and it worked like a charm.

http://img142.imageshack.us/img142/7048/facestudyfinal9au.jpg
And LeadMagnet (late reply, but well, maybe you are subscribed):

I think the color setting refers to PS's ability to give the brushes similar modes like the layers, e.g. color mode. I don't have that in artweaver, so I had to do without it. Still worked pretty fine for me.

til soon everyone.

yylau
05-12-2006, 09:05 PM
1. http://designers.no-ip.biz/lyy/a.jpg

2. http://designers.no-ip.biz/lyy/b.jpg

3. http://designers.no-ip.biz/lyy/c.jpg

4. http://designers.no-ip.biz/lyy/d.jpg

The forth picture looks little bit different from linda's sample. (I have change the contrast in order to make the reflection of the hair brighter)
I am a cg beginner and bad in ENG = ="

Really thanks Linda. I like your works, like your tutorials, like your tatent.


everyone, give me some comment pls :D

Carlosestupinan
11-03-2006, 05:51 PM
I'm can't belive .......work hard or genius.....

windy9
01-15-2007, 05:02 AM
thank uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu :thumbsup: :applause:

ThePhotographer
01-15-2007, 10:09 PM
I once tried to follow this tutorial, but found it a bit complicated ....

Now, looking at the images, I really find that there's an area where the hair is very, very sharp and then SUDDENLY to each side, it gets blurred ....

I'd recommend that the limit between sharpness and blur is much much more subtle ....

You can't have a bunch of hair in the middle which is extremely sharp and detailed and then all of a sudden at both sides have big blur ....

comixnut
06-24-2007, 02:20 PM
G'day, my name is PJ and this is my first post on the site! I was actually sent to your website by a friend to check out your tuts and then found my way here. Despite having used photoshop for a few years i have only just recently decided to try and paint with it, so forgive me if some of the questions i have about this awesome tutorial seem quite noobish!

I am using PS CS3
1) When you say spacing 25% that is the same as Flow, correct?
2)i know you can choose the opacity of a brush, but what does set itit to opacity mean?
3) similarly, how do you "set your brush's opacity to colour on top of your regular opacity"?

I am sure i will have more in the near future as i have just started the tutorial.

Thanking anybody in advance who cares to point me in the right direction,

Cheers.

gaiXyn
07-18-2007, 08:14 PM
well Linda, yourWork is aweSome and this tutorial proves why.....I've read it's not so much for beginners, but I'll still try to see what I can get from it.....hopefully I'll be able to transfer your teachings into a 3D environment...I would like to say thank you for your giving of this knowledge so freely....it would be nicer of you tho if you could zip this baby up, or PDF this badBoy so that I ( I mean we, hehe ) could view it where and whenEver I ( we ) want.....but that would be asking for icing on a already delicious cake ( sorry, I have a really bad sweet tooth...lol...noReally!! )

thanks again Linda,


ltr-

miJmi
07-21-2007, 04:44 AM
Well done, smooth delivery, fantastic art and lesson! No go have some summer fun with... can we say it... ice-cream (what's that song again?)... Unless you want to turn into that other "teacher" :) Cheers 'n much thanks, Michael

greekgodgeo
07-21-2007, 05:57 AM
Hmm... I'd take this tutorial with a grain of salt. It is informative, but Linda Bergkvist is blending a photo in this piece: I brightened up my monitor and I can clearly see the photo she's blending. I brightened up one of her steps so you can clearly see it:

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t259/enaylafraud/faketut.jpg

It looks like she is in fact a liar; She should mention she uses photos in her works, especially in a tutorial. Does the CG Society know what she's doing? This should be mentioned in her tutorial.

greekgodgeo
07-21-2007, 07:02 AM
I want to know why CG Society is covering enayla's photomanipulation left and right. Have you no ethics? Have you no respect for your readers? I bring this up and I get banned or flamed. Why? Because I have the balls to speak the truth? Or is it because you're profiting from Linda Bergkvist's photomanipulations, and you don't want her exposed. I made a new thread regarding this matter, and it was quickly deleted. Gee, I wonder why.

I want to know why CG Society finds this acceptable:

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t259/enaylafraud/faketut.jpg

She's blending a photo in this tutorial, and she makes no mention of this. Why is this acceptable?

Ego
07-21-2007, 07:18 AM
George, what we want to know is why you have this incredible obsession with Linda? Seriously, there are doctors for what you have. Most people have moved on with their lives post Linda. You just registered another id again after getting banned, and out of 17 posts, 15 are spamming Linda. Please go see a shrink.

greekgodgeo
07-21-2007, 07:27 AM
George, what we want to know is why you have this incredible obsession with Linda? Seriously, there are doctors for what you have. Most people have moved on with their lives post Linda. You just registered another id again after getting banned, and out of 17 posts, 15 are spamming Linda. Please go see a shrink.

It's funny how you have to resort to childish name calling when it's obvious to anyone with some form of intelligence (not you, please don't give yourself too much credit), that Linda Bergkvist photomanipulates. Seriously. I'm sure if you have a pair of eyes, you can clearly see this.

In case you can't, let's recap:

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t259/enaylafraud/boat.jpg

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t259/enaylafraud/overlay.jpg

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t259/enaylafraud/hair.jpg

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t259/enaylafraud/paintoverevidence.jpg

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t259/enaylafraud/Cheat.jpg

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t259/enaylafraud/faketut.jpg




Again, can you tell me why you think this is acceptable? You can't, you have to resort to asking why am I pointing out the fact that she's a liar. The question should be, why didn't she mention she blended a photo in this tutorial. Don't blame/ban me for having the balls to point it out. Ban her for lying to you all.

Maidith
07-21-2007, 12:20 PM
George, I thought that discussion was over. How much time do you have on your hands, that you can spend it all looking on the internet for your so-called proof? Could it be that you are slightly obsessed? Linda has done hundreds of digital paintings in the past eight years, yet you can only present "proof" for a small fraction of those.

It IS possible to paint in a very photorealistic manner, even when you work in acrylics or oil paints. Think of the realist movement in art scene of the 1980s, where paintings were made that looked exactly like photos (Chuck Close for example). Linda herself said that she uses photos as reference heavily, so why shouldn't her work be very photorealistic? The big canvases on computers make it possible to paint even the smallest details. Haven't you proved that yourself with your photorealistic paintings?

Please cut it, finally.

Nazirull
07-21-2007, 12:35 PM
Go show ur proof at the matte painting thread. They use lots of photos...:rolleyes:

SylvanMist
07-22-2007, 03:26 AM
I always admired her artwork, but I never knew that she used photo references that much. That doesn't change my admiration for her art, but it does make me feel a whole lot better! :D

I think a lot of beginner artists can be a bit too intimidated by these "art gods" who can pull such masterpieces seemingly out of their minds. And we get wound up in trying to only draw/paint from our minds instead of trying to make a beautiful piece by using references, models, etc..
I'm sure there are a few who can draw/paint nearly 100% from their minds, but that doesn't mean we should "have" to do that as artists.

So here's proof that even the best artists around here use photo references quite a lot. I do wish she would have mentioned that though when the art was posted though, I never would have known.


Nevertheless, Linda, your artwork is beautiful, it's truly inspiring and I hope to see something new from you soon! :)

Cnecktor
07-22-2007, 04:07 AM
I never knew she use photos but I still love her art. I do feel kinda slaped in the face thoe I have tryed many of times to follow her tutorials with very dissatisfied resaults. I usually just figered I don't have the skill she has and that I should try harder and practice more. I don't know how I could ever get my paintings to look as good when there are photos being used and I didn't know that. I don't think its bad to use photos I just thought she painted everything her self. I don't how thoe one would expect to get the same or similar look in her tutorials if we aren't told there are photos being use or how to use them.

WyattHarris
07-23-2007, 05:34 PM
I'm sorry but I didn't realize Linda using photo reference makes her a liar seeing as how we all do it. Does she have to specifically show you all the references she used in an image, of course not. For those of you who sound so disappointed at this "discovery" try her techniques with your own reference. Its not like it becomes paint-by-numbers just because of that, you still need skill developed from practice.

And George I don't get why you sound like Mr. Super Detective Guy who has found something that will ROCK the digital art world. Linda has posted her photo references many times in the past. To me it is helpful to see where an idea comes from. Find something better to do, like art.

W-I-L
07-24-2007, 11:52 AM
rather thna starting a new thread and as this is still recently active i would just like to ask what has actually happenened to linda? she seems to have disapeared and no new artwork is on her site... anyone?

W-I-L
07-24-2007, 02:04 PM
Hmm... I'd take this tutorial with a grain of salt. It is informative, but Linda Bergkvist is blending a photo in this piece: I brightened up my monitor and I can clearly see the photo she's blending. I brightened up one of her steps so you can clearly see it:

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t259/enaylafraud/faketut.jpg

It looks like she is in fact a liar; She should mention she uses photos in her works, especially in a tutorial. Does the CG Society know what she's doing? This should be mentioned in her tutorial.


btw slick . . . I do not belive that linda is blending a photo iun this piece... does it look like she has cut and paste this in due to the hard cut corners you have pointed out? . . .yes it does... but there is a much more obvious explanation for this. As she has stated time and again, linda often cuts a bit of her painting from the whole canvas and pastes that into a new document, blowing it up for detailing and then once done, pastes the detailed part of the image back into the main canvas
This is all this looks like to me.. i often do the same thing and paste it back into the main canvas .... so i can not see where you are coming from as many times linda has shown form start to fin how she makes the image.
As to your previous rants on showing images she has painted over.. i think they are merely refrenced.... and there are not many artists that do not reference... is there any law that states it must all be from your head?.. surely without life drawing and copying we would never learn

gaiXyn
07-24-2007, 02:24 PM
well like many of you I didn't know she used photographs that heavily....but her work is still great...so it doesn't bother me tooMuch....it would of been nice tho that she mentioned using a photo in the tutorial as it was easy to assume that none was used...not saying that it would automatically make my works better if it was mentioned....but it would be nice know......I'm new to the artWorld and only recently ( taking 3D CG seriously ) started learning myWay around it....but it seems to me to get realWorld results, you have to look at the realWorld....veryFew of us can pull something str8 out of ourMind that looks great right out of the gate....but the one with the ship does look exact tho ....so.....

anyWays, in George's defense....you can't expect him to find all the prove...I mean the one's he did find are pretty compelling....for him, it would be almost impossible to find every single photoRef she used, using just the internet.....but again, I still enjoy and will continue to enjoy herWork....only now it wouldn't seem so out of reach....:)...after all, for me it's about the idea/imagination and not only about the drawing itself....


rather thna starting a new thread and as this is still recently active i would just like to ask what has actually happenened to linda? she seems to have disapeared and no new artwork is on her site... anyone?

on herSite (http://www.furiae.com/index.php) it mentions that she's been ill......


ltr-

MasonDoran
07-24-2007, 02:26 PM
i fail to see the differance between straight up painting over photos, drawing from real life, or tracing photo referance.

The end result is what matters, not the steps taken.

In the professional world, painting over photos is completely necessary merely to meet deadlines or to reach a certain standard of quality. I know some concept artists that will download images of random object, and do complete paintovers to make it into an entirely different object. The entire industry depends on this.

Also, do a comparison of Art, before and after the invention of the camera to see how photo referance quickly became influential to artists.

It really is ridiculous that art nazis try to attack people like this, as if there was some ethical law when in fact the entire industry is doing it everyday.