PDA

View Full Version : What is the standard size?


Leonardo Vega
07-17-2005, 03:43 PM
What's a good size (pixel @ dpi) to work in? I really want to make a peice for the expose book. They ask for atleast 3700 x 2700 @ 300 dpi. Should I go bigger or stay around their?

I'm very new to the digital painting world, so all this talk about size and dpi aren't too familiar to me. I know dpi stands for dots per inch, the higher the better.

But I just wanted to know what standard size the veterans use.


Thanks,
- Leo

mzee
07-17-2005, 03:56 PM
What's a good size (pixel @ dpi) to work in? I really want to make a peice for the expose book. They ask for atleast 3700 x 2700 @ 300 dpi. Should I go bigger or stay around their?

I'm very new to the digital painting world, so all this talk about size and dpi aren't too familiar to me. I know dpi stands for dots per inch, the higher the better.

But I just wanted to know what standard size the veterans use.


Thanks,
- Leo

A4 = 2480x3508
A3 = 3508x4961

Hope this will help you.

Lc
07-17-2005, 03:59 PM
There's not universal size. All depends on the work you wish to carry out, but also its finality. I mean if your pict will be on internet, or will be print on a book, T-Shirt.... After you know that, you can work on a high resolution image to add more details, etc and resized it at the end. then you'll have a better render.

The resolution given for the expose book is a minimum I think, for the quality of print.

cya ~~ le coYote

Leonardo Vega
07-17-2005, 04:04 PM
It's just that sometimes you just create to create, like I did with my pirate. But then when I went to submit my work for the expose I noticed my work was too small (1200x800)... so I felt kinda bad. So I'd like to make work that I can use for future purposes.

But I guess I should just go as big as possible... 35,000x27,000 lol ;)

- Leo

Lc
07-17-2005, 04:22 PM
if you decide to create a picture as big as possible (35 000 x 27 000 for example :p) make sur that your pc can support it ^^ cause that would be a pity that you spend 3 hours to open your psd... :)

moreover, the picts will be very very big (Mo).

PerfectBlue
07-17-2005, 09:35 PM
Bigger the better! But only as big as it is livable to draw with.


With freehand drawing, the huger the pic is, the more corners or flat spots you get when attempting larger/fast curves with a brush. I work at screen res, or slightly bigger with 72dpi. When i make a piece which needs to be larger i usually double or quadruple my DPI, so it can be printed (if need be) easily. :)

Schwinnz
07-18-2005, 12:26 AM
A4 = 2480x3508
A3 = 3508x4961

Hope this will help you.

You have to specify the DPI, your numbers are then totally useless.

Lilith
07-18-2005, 04:00 PM
I think it depends on what you want do with the image. If you want to print an 16x21 image just make the new document 16x21 inches, drop down the little menu in photoshop to change px to in, and choose 300dpi because you want to print the image.

Its better to go for a larger size than recommended, it depends in your computer and if you like to make little details, you know. :)

navate
07-19-2005, 01:28 AM
I think it's all about what is comfortable for you. I started out doing pictures at 1000 pixels 150 dpi (because I knew nothing about printing), then I moved up to 2000, 3000...etc. I currently work around 5000-6000px at 300 dpi for full paintings--not because "the bigger the better", though I know my images will look better in print larger, but because it's a size I am comfortable with for the level of detail I put into my pieces. Even my speedpaints are done at 1000-2000, simply because I like the detail level there. So, my canvases have grown as I have, because of the detailing level I'm demanding of myself.

So, yeah. Do what is comfortable to you. :] No use painting if the canvas's size daunts you--or poops out your computer.

heythatreallyhurts
07-19-2005, 01:41 AM
I have a similar question. Should I be starting my paintings at the size of the final piece, or is there some way to increase the size as you work without getting pixilation? I really don't like starting a large image (an image too big to fit entirely on my monitor) and then zooming out to work on it, but I'm pretty retarded with Photoshop, so I can't figure out a good way to start at a low resolution and up-res as I work. (I work in Painter, by the way, just using Photoshop for sizing and cropping and sometimes fixing mistakes.)

navate
07-19-2005, 02:18 AM
It is possible (and helpful, I think); just don't make the starting image -too- small and expect some blurriness to occur, depending on how big to increase it to. So--definitely wait to do any detailing and stuff until after you enlarge it, just in case, so you don't lose the work. In Photoshop, go to Image > Image Size to increase or decrease size.

I actually start all my paintings at around 1500 pixels (always 300 dpi), just to get the shapes and colors blocked in because blocking in color on a 6000px canvas...no. Just, no. XD It starts lagging too much for me. I find it much easier to plan things out on a smaller scale. So I "sketch" it out smallish, fiddle with it compositionally and color-wise until I'm happy, and then blow it up to refine the sketch and start the real work. ;] Everything ends up getting overpainted in the detailing, but the "frame", if you will, was already there. But this is just the way I work--there is, of course, no real right or wrong way to go about things. :] Do what you're comfortable with.

rogfa
07-19-2005, 03:06 AM
I remember from the Ryan Church DVDs he started with something like 1500 pixels @ 72dpi and then eventually up-rezed it to around 3000 or higher but always keeping it at 72dpi. Is there any correlation between dimensions and dpi? What am asking is, if my document is 3000 by 4000 pixels, does it matter if it's 72dpi or 300dpi?

tayete
07-19-2005, 09:34 AM
The 72 dpi is a "urban legend", a myth. We take for granted what we read and we don't check the truth beneath, at least myself.

Try this: save a picture (let's say 300x300) at 72 dpi, and the same picture (300x300) at 1 dpi. Take a look at it on your screen. Upload it to some web. Do you notice anything? Yes, they are exactly the same!!!

Conclusion: dpis are something to take care for printing, but if you just want to show it on the web, use 1 dpi instead of 72, and you'll save some space, bandwith, and you'll suffer less lag while painting.

gane
07-19-2005, 02:26 PM
The 72 dpi is a "urban legend", a myth. We take for granted what we read and we don't check the truth beneath, at least myself.

Try this: save a picture (let's say 300x300) at 72 dpi, and the same picture (300x300) at 1 dpi. Take a look at it on your screen. Upload it to some web. Do you notice anything? Yes, they are exactly the same!!!

Conclusion: dpis are something to take care for printing, but if you just want to show it on the web, use 1 dpi instead of 72, and you'll save some space, bandwith, and you'll suffer less lag while painting.

we are talking about printing...
300 dpi for printing (but if you print bilboard, resoulution must be 72, if you print buissines card it can be 250 dpi...)

on web everything must be 72, it can be higher but some people have low connection and if you put on web page picture with 300 dpi it will open for a few weeks on dial-up connection...

fourcrowsArt
07-19-2005, 02:28 PM
The 72 dpi is a "urban legend", a myth. We take for granted what we read and we don't check the truth beneath, at least myself.

Try this: save a picture (let's say 300x300) at 72 dpi, and the same picture (300x300) at 1 dpi. Take a look at it on your screen. Upload it to some web. Do you notice anything? Yes, they are exactly the same!!!

Conclusion: dpis are something to take care for printing, but if you just want to show it on the web, use 1 dpi instead of 72, and you'll save some space, bandwith, and you'll suffer less lag while painting.

ACK!!! Is this true?? Wouldn't it be miniscule in size? That's why you have an actual pixels view in photoshop...so you can see how it will show in pixels...

....wandering away to do an experiment...

heythatreallyhurts
07-19-2005, 11:02 PM
ACK!!! Is this true?? Wouldn't it be miniscule in size? That's why you have an actual pixels view in photoshop...so you can see how it will show in pixels...

....wandering away to do an experiment...

Nah, it would look just the same. Using the actual pixels view, everything is at 72 ppi, because that's what monitors display. (At least, I think so?) The only difference would be the actual size of your image if you were to have it printed.

greyface
07-19-2005, 11:32 PM
DPI only matters if you specify the size in Inches, that's why it stands for Dots Per Inch. So if you give pixel dimensions, it won't change anything. If you want to print to a specific size, enter the paper size in Inches, specify the quality via the DPI setting: usually 300 for high quality prints.

c-g
07-20-2005, 02:20 AM
Nah, it would look just the same. Using the actual pixels view, everything is at 72 ppi, because that's what monitors display. (At least, I think so?) The only difference would be the actual size of your image if you were to have it printed.

Isn't that a throwback from the old Macs that all had standard monitor sizes? I mean won't my 21" Monitor have a different dpi than someone's 17" ? :) What happens if I'm not at 640x480? (like was standard back when everyone decided that 72dpi was correct)

tayete
07-20-2005, 10:03 AM
on web everything must be 72, it can be higher but some people have low connection and if you put on web page picture with 300 dpi it will open for a few weeks on dial-up connection...

Soooooo....another member of the 72dpi Myth Club. For the web you can use just 1 dpi. Just try it. Your monitor will display it exactly the same, with much less bandwith and size.

FourCrows][/b]
ACK!!! Is this true?? Wouldn't it be miniscule in size? That's why you have an actual pixels view in photoshop...so you can see how it will show in pixels...

....wandering away to do an experiment...
No, the size will be what you decide. If you upload a 300x300 image at 1 dpi, it WILL be 300x300 pixels.

fourcrowsArt
07-20-2005, 12:27 PM
ok, here was my test...

This is one of my birds from ebay...I took out the old file and changed nothing but the resolution in photoshop...

72pxls...

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/fourcrows/birdtest72pxl.jpg

1pxl.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/fourcrows/birdtest1pxl.jpg



SO THEN....I went back and checked if the pixel dimensions had changed when I had resized the resolution...it had...so I changed them back...lol...which I had never even noticed before...(why does it do that?)

this is what I got after I changed the pixel dimensions...what amazes me is no change in quality what-so-ever....

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/fourcrows/birdtest1pxl324dpi.jpg

...so DAMN! you guys taught me something HUGE! Do you know how much bandwidth this could save me???

but, that said, since you change the dimesnion size back to original, is it really using just the same??


(I'm sorry to sound completely daft about this, but this is a bit of a revelation to me...)

either way...thank you!! :thumbsup: (because when folks snag your art off of ebay, they get a dot instead of something to reproduce!)

DrFx
07-20-2005, 01:15 PM
Soooooo....another member of the 72dpi Myth Club. For the web you can use just 1 dpi. Just try it. Your monitor will display it exactly the same, with much less bandwith and size.
[/i]

Tayete, there is no difference in KB size between resolutions (if you don't resample, duh!)
The 72dpi "myth", as you call it, exists because it is the standard resolution for most screens. Of course, you can configure your screen to show more or less, but if there is a standard that is it!
And you are the one engaging on a myth, saying that changing dpi will alter your bandwidth requirements, I've tried it with TIFF and downloaded FourCrows JPEGs and they're absolutely the same!

DrFx
07-20-2005, 01:17 PM
To be a little more elaborate: If you want people to print what they see on screen easily and at the same size, do put it at 72ppi, if you want them to get a poster size print, then 1ppi will be fine.

fourcrowsArt
07-20-2005, 03:52 PM
....sigh.....


I wish I had been born about 10 years later...then I may actually understand all this...as it stands, I'm just pathetic...

ok, so, I'm just going to keep doing what I've been doing...

and get back to the art...lol...


thanks DrFx

DrFx
07-20-2005, 09:49 PM
I hope I helped a bit, but once you understand it, it's not difficult to deal with at all! As an architect, I have to deal with scales as well as print sizes, and sometimes I get quite confused!

I sometimes wish "I'd had the knowledge I do now when I was 10", but that would just make me a cynical and bitter ten-year-old! :curious:

tayete
07-22-2005, 07:39 AM
Well, DrFx, maybe Wayne Fulton can explain it better than me. Please take a look at

http://www.scantips.com/no72dpi.html (http://www.scantips.com/no72dpi.html)

and you'll understand what I mean. Maybe I am explaining myself badly (English is not my language), or maybe you are doing something wrong experimenting this.

Lilith
07-23-2005, 02:47 AM
Well, DrFx, maybe Wayne Fulton can explain it better than me. Please take a look at

http://www.scantips.com/no72dpi.html (http://www.scantips.com/no72dpi.html)

and you'll understand what I mean. Maybe I am explaining myself badly (English is not my language), or maybe you are doing something wrong experimenting this.

I read the article, very interesting. But you forgot something, if you change the dpi, the size in pixels of the document will change too. Thats why some people here talk about how big or small will be the size of image if you change de dpi. So if you want to change the dpi without changing the pixels size you have to deselect "resample image". Something like that, my english is very bad too. :D

jmBoekestein
07-26-2005, 07:38 PM
Jinkies, look at it as standard metrics for instance where x and y cover a range in space which can be covered with pixels.

say you made n drawing at 800 x 600, and you want to print it 10 cm wide, here's what you do.

you divide 800 by 10, getting 80 pixels per cm. Now I don't deal with inches iof I don't have to actually, but it applies as well.

Usually there's a dropdown when changing canvas/image size, it will give you options on which units to use.

The rest is perceptive. the more pixels on a surface the higher the feinition of that surfaces paint.

edit: if you're going to print simply consult the print service for it's standard resolutions, or figure it out with your printer driver. ;)

CGTalk Moderation
07-26-2005, 07:38 PM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.