PDA

View Full Version : Book on computer graphics fundamentals


jshuler
07-12-2005, 07:25 PM
I was looking my first book on computer graphics and found the following:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1568811241/qid=1121190344/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/103-6238597-7801442?v=glance&s=books

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0321321375/qid=1121190369/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/103-6238597-7801442?v=glance&s=books

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0023548568/qid=1121191446/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/103-6238597-7801442

Has anyone used these books and might have an opinion?

Thanks,
J.

mummey
07-12-2005, 08:45 PM
I was looking my first book on computer graphics and found the following:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1568811241/qid=1121190344/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/103-6238597-7801442?v=glance&s=books


Good, but has a bunch of typos.


http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0321321375/qid=1121190369/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/103-6238597-7801442?v=glance&s=books


Read it once, don't remember anything significant from it.


http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0023548568/qid=1121191446/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/103-6238597-7801442


Ok, but far from perfect.


Andy van Damm's book is pretty good. Peter Shirley's is well-rounded but pretty new so I recommend looking for the errata if you're going to use it.

-b

chromiumjade
07-14-2005, 04:19 AM
I agree with mummey: I found the Shirley book to be useful and the Hill book not overly useful.

If you're going to get any OpenGL books, I would pass on your choice and go right to the source and buy the Orange and Red OpenGL Programming Guide from by the OpenGL ARB. My copies are pretty tattered from being hauled around!

Nerd_Pack
08-05-2005, 05:43 PM
also, if you go to the opengl website they have guides online on the language for free, red book and blue book. They're not the latest version, but when you're just learning you don't need the latest version. I always used these as a quick reference while I was learning.

AdamAtomic
08-05-2005, 06:34 PM
The only books I use for graphics programming are the OpenGL Red and Blue books, which are invaluable if you are using OGL, and this:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1568811829/qid=1123263185/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_sbs_1/103-6426688-0819008?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

I learned everything I know about the basics of graphics and 3D rendering from that book, it is the best one I know of.

mummey
08-05-2005, 09:33 PM
The only books I use for graphics programming are the OpenGL Red and Blue books, which are invaluable if you are using OGL, and this:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1568811829/qid=1123263185/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_sbs_1/103-6426688-0819008?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

I learned everything I know about the basics of graphics and 3D rendering from that book, it is the best one I know of.

Red Book pdf (http://www.gamedev.net/reference/count.asp?LinkID=993)(though its for OpenGL 1.1, all of it applies today.)

jfelrod1960
08-05-2005, 10:27 PM
The only books I use for graphics programming are the OpenGL Red and Blue books, which are invaluable if you are using OGL, and this:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1568811829/qid=1123263185/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_sbs_1/103-6426688-0819008?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

I learned everything I know about the basics of graphics and 3D rendering from that book, it is the best one I know of.

I super duper agree!
http://www.realtimerendering.com

stew
08-05-2005, 11:01 PM
I was looking my first book on computer graphics and found the following:
(emphasis mine)

What exactly do you want to learn? How stuff works, how to write a game or how to write a renderer? As a first book on computer graphics, Foley et al's "Computer Graphics Principles and Practice in C" is probably the most popular book. I also found Alan Watt's books quite helpful for the basics. Regarding "how to write a renderer", Pharr and Humphrey's "Physically based rendering" or Stephenson's "Production rendering" are the new shooting stars. For writing real-time applications, there are quite a few references in the previous posts.

mjs1
08-06-2005, 06:30 AM
I think the red and blue books are great, but if you've never done 3D before, it will help to get a book covering the basic theory as well. The red and blue books are centered primarily on learning OpenGL programming syntax. Invaluable, but if you don't know the principles of matrix transformations and/or the basic geometry/trig behind it all, you'll find it a tough road.

I am a new graphics programmer myself (been doing it about two years). The book I read after the Red Book was the F.S. Hill book. What's nice about it is that it teaches the basic theories with OpenGL, so you learn both as you go. I also bought a copy of the OpenGL SuperBible at the time.

The "Physically Based Rendering" and "Production Rendering" books are outstanding, but are probably not the best books for someone brand-new to 3D graphics programming. They're more geared toward people already well-versed in the basic concepts of graphics programming. For example, people who want to learn how to go from the basic raytracer you typically build in a beginning college-level computer graphics course to more advanced, more highly-featured, more efficient renderers/raytracers.

Your best bet if you are going to start learning from scratch is to get access to a linux system (free compiler), install glut, and get the OpenGL Red Book. They have excellent examples in there and you can very rapidly get squares and spheres flying around on screen. When you feel comfortable with that, pick up one of the books that goes more into the theory. If you get the Hill book, you get theory along with OpenGL examples. I know the Hill book isn't perfect, but having a basic, in-depth theory book that used OpenGL was very helpful to me. It's also written in a slightly less academic style than the Watt books. The Watt books are very good, don't get me wrong. They are sitting right next to me as I write this. :) But if you are just learning and they are your only source, it might be a little tough going.

In the end, you will most likely have several books that all cover the same info but from slightly different angles. Many times I was reading Hill's book only to find something that was covered better in the Watt books, David Eberly's books, or Advanced Renderman, and vice versa.

Just my two cents.

stew
08-06-2005, 07:04 AM
Your best bet if you are going to start learning from scratch is to get access to a linux system (free compiler), install glut, and get the OpenGL Red Book.
Linux isn't necessary - free compilers can be had for almost any other operating system. OS X ships with Xcode and Microsoft is giving away the "Express Editions" of Visual Studio. But if you haven't touched Linux before, learning to use it can't be wrong either.

CGTalk Moderation
08-06-2005, 07:04 AM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.