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HONG KONGer
07-11-2005, 06:27 AM
Hi, I'm a Maya beginner user.

I've self-learned many modeling tools (both Nurbs and poly) from many Maya books. But when I want to model something (a computer mouse for example), I just don't know how to build it.

See the problem? I know the tools but don't know how to use it.

Anyone facing the same problem?

HONG KONGer
07-11-2005, 06:29 AM
Oh it sould be weak, not week

tntcheats
07-11-2005, 07:10 AM
It's called requiring practice.
Just work at things, and you'll get better.
If you're struggling, look it up.

Everyone has to do it.
You can't read a guitar tab and suddenly be able to play the Metallica solo for Enter Sandman if you've never even touched a guitar in your life.

thom905
07-12-2005, 08:22 AM
Try taking pictures of the front, side, and top view and place that in Maya as a refferece.

Nicool
07-12-2005, 10:39 AM
Hi HONG KONGer !

Keep it up. I want you to have pleasure at modeling. Maybe you've no method. Let me propose you mine (not saying I am good or it is the best method)

1 - It is actually the most important part (and the one you should take the more attention). Place main lines and surface. Obviously you need reference and/or experience for modeling. Get inspired by well lighted photographs (with shadows to understand the shapes) and muscles/skull orientations. At this step, it easy to check proportions with a low number of vertices (and no connectivity). Keep your model really simple to work only on your model shape (dont get annoyed with your software functions and limitations) Dont go to the next step before this one is completed : good proportions, low number of really usefull surfaces only :banghead: Otherwise you will whad more polygons on a model that is wrong since the beginning (and it will be really hard to correct it then).

2 - Since you have good proportions your can now connect first step's surfaces. Take care to keep the main lines you have drawn! Those main lines will give you automatically a good topology because in the first step (which was quite esay) you've worked without any constraints by getting inspired "artistics" lines. Don't had too much details here (no nostrils, no hears, no detailed eye area), make sure your model is made of one good piece.

3 - Then simply tweak your model and had more and more details. Since the two lat step where validated (in term of proportions and topology) it goes easy to bring your model to an upper level of quality. Or stop here to switch to Zbrush or switch to Sub-D surfaces

Hope it helps. I am looking forward your model :thumbsup:

http://ndhaussy.free.fr/temp/tempIMAGES/modeling_steps_Nicolas_dHaussy.jpg

StephanD
07-12-2005, 12:47 PM
I like this method Nicool :thumbsup:


I used a similar one in the timelapse on this thread,it's an almost foolproof method for edgeloops and it's fast.

http://www.cgtalk.com/showthread.php?t=223986


For some,it can be more intuitive to model out of a box or other primitive and cut edges around it or even mix several methods you have learned.Any method that gets you good results is valid and don't restrict yourself to one.


Usually,wether method I use,I want to start by 'encapsulating' the reference with the object/surface...be it an extruded set of Edges,a Cube or cylinder then add a few edges here and there to quickly define the overall shapes and Extrude/Cut some more to follow the actual surface of the thing and start moving vertice either with standard Move tool or a Sculpt tool.

Don't be affraid of higher polygon counts,if you need to push it up to mimic the shape, by all means do it but keep in mind that you'll have to select and delete edges/polygons to increase viewport performances for animation/rendering.

For organic modeling it's a matter of coherence,observation and ,when required,a good knowledge of anatomy...But that's only physical,a good character is also much deeper than looks,especially since it's digital,the personality has to be much more transparent or descriptive.I wouldn't go as far as saying that you need to get into anthropology but that could help for that kind of projects.

Get good references(sculptures!!!,images,videos) and start with a small project,eventually,you'll want to try your hand at harder stuff.


Hope this helps

Princesinha
07-12-2005, 02:49 PM
Hi, I'm a Maya beginner user.

I've self-learned many modeling tools (both Nurbs and poly) from many Maya books. But when I want to model something (a computer mouse for example), I just don't know how to build it.

See the problem? I know the tools but don't know how to use it.

Anyone facing the same problem?

Can you give me the link to the tutorials or tutorials name 'cos I'm starting now maya techniques but I don't know how to do anything :(

Please, someone can help me giving me tutorials and some advices?

Nicool
07-12-2005, 05:47 PM
The tutorial is right up this thread :) Otherwise go to learning-maya.com

Mouse
07-12-2005, 09:04 PM
Usually,wether method I use,I want to start by 'encapsulating' the reference with the object/surface...be it an extruded set of Edges,a Cube or cylinder then add a few edges here and there to quickly define the overall shapes and Extrude/Cut some more to follow the actual surface of the thing and start moving vertice either with standard Move tool or a Sculpt tool.Something along these lines I find very useful is to sketch out the shape in 3D where I'll be building the model with splines before I start building with 3D shapes, either tracing reference images I've got set up in viewport backgounds (my usual way) or simply drawing them from scratch. Having something with more form than my reference images that can be rotated around while I work (and used as guides in 3D space to build the model around) is a huge help when it comes to visualising what I'm building.

Splines are much easier to edit than partially-built models, and can give you enough of an idea of your model's form to be sure you've got the shapes down correctly before you start working. The first time I did this I built a cat's head, and I'm pretty sure I'd have come up with a horrible model if I was just trying to build it from bitmap references (and from trying to convince my cat to sit still for five seconds ;) ).

I guess this technique isn't anything new, but I thought it worth mentioning.

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07-12-2005, 09:04 PM
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