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Rebeccak
07-11-2005, 01:58 AM
REFERENCE BOOKS FOR ARTISTIC ANATOMY AND FIGURATIVE DRAWING:

(Click book titles to be taken to their particular page on Amazon.com - you don't have to buy from them, but you can see what the cover looks like, etc. and compare prices)

INSTRUCTIONAL:

"Albinus on Anatomy" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/048625836X/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&n=507846&s=books&v=glance), by Robert Beverly Hale and Terence Coyle - Dover Publications, publisher

"Artistic Anatomy" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0823002977/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Dr. Paul Richer - Watson Guptill, publisher

"Anatomy Lessons From The Great Masters" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0823002810/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Robert Beverly Hale and Terence Coyle - Watson Guptill, publisher

"Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195030958/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Stephen Rogers Peck - Oxford University Press, publisher

"An Atlas of Anatomy for Artists" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0486202410/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Fritz Schider - Dover Publications, publisher

"Anatomy for the Artist" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0316875236/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Jeno Barcsay - Barnes & Noble Books, publisher

"Human Anatomy for Artists - The Elements of Form" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195052064/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Eliot Goldfinger - Oxford University Press, publisher

"Master Class in Figure Drawing" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0823030148/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Robert Beverly Hale - Watson Guptill, publisher

"Figure Drawing For All It's Worth" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00005VWK3/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Andrew Loomis - Viking Press (out of print)

"Dynamic Anatomy" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0823015521/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Burne Hogarth - Watson Guptill, publisher[/url]

"The Human Machine: The Anatomical Structure and Mechanism of the Human Body" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1892053039/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by George Bridgeman - Dover, publisher

" (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0879515368/pricecompar0d-20/ref%3Dnosim/102-1911993-6034569)High-Focus Drawing - A Revolutionary Approach to Drawing the Figure", by James McMullan - Overlook Press, publisher (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0879515368/pricecompar0d-20/ref%3Dnosim/102-1911993-6034569)

"The Artist's Complete Guide to Figure Drawing" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0823003035/ref=pd_kar_gw_1/103-2497184-1739012?%5Fencoding=UTF8%2CUTF8&v=glance&n=283155) by Anthony Ryder (artist).
Excellent book, and not too expensive! The artist is a traditional artist working in pencil ~ his work is HIGHLY realistic and beautiful.

Anatomy for the Artist (Hardcover) (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/078948045X/sr=8-2/qid=1149647792/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-5070899-5230558?%5Fencoding=UTF8) by Sarah Simblet, John Davis
This books contains beautiful photographs, more so than it does Anatomical instruction. It does contain a few overlays of skeletal drawings etc., but it is worth the money for the excellent professional quality photographs of highly muscled models.

EDIT:

(http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-form/002-3325844-7329607)Entire Master Draughtsman Series of Paperback Books: (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/ref=br_ss_hs/103-2497184-1739012?platform=gurupa&url=index%3Dstripbooks%3Arelevance-above%26dispatch%3Dsearch%26results-process%3Dbin&field-keywords=Master+Draughtsman+Series&Go.x=15&Go.y=5&Go=Go)
Great books because they are cheap, light, and great for copying from, as you will not be concerned about destroying the book ~ they are really instructional devices, more than anything else.
(to find: run search for "master draughtsman series" on Amazon.com).

EDIT 12/07:

Visualizing Muscles: A New Ecorché Approach to Surface Anatomy (Paperback) by John Cody (http://www.amazon.com/Visualizing-Muscles-Ecorch%C3%A9-Approach-Surface/dp/070060426X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1198271373&sr=8-1)
Fantastic reference featuring photos of a model painted with muscle striations. Great book!!!

EDIT 12/07:

BOOKS BY / ABOUT DRAUGHTSMEN:


"Michelangelo" (http://www.garygeraths.com/purchase.html), by Bernard Lamarche-Vadel - Chartwell Books, Inc., publisher

"Michelangelo And His Drawings" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0300047967/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Michael Hirst - Yale University Press

"Pontormo" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0810937174/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by/edited by Salvatore S. Nigro and Marianne Scheider - Schirmer / Mosel, publisher

"The Drawings of Rubens" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0875051863/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), Master Draughtsman Series of books - Borden Publishing Company, publisher

"The Drawings of Harry Carmean" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/087505210X/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), Master Draughtsman Series of books - Borden Publishing Company, publisher

"Carmean" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0875052304/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by June Harwood - Harwood / Carmean, publisher


[u]OF INTEREST:

"Encyclopaedia Anatomica - Museo La Specola Florence" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/3822810185/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance)- Taschen, publisher

_____________

Clearly, you don't need all of these! The best thing to do is hunt a few of the top INSTRUCTIONAL books down online or in the bookstores, and see what you like best.
So long as the books that you find contain reference including the skeleton in front, back, and side view, as well as the muscular and surface structures in these three views, you should be fine. Often, artists like to have several books on hand, however, as each reference book can offer something unique, even if the same subject matter is covered.

In terms of books about ARTISTS, everyone should have a book containing Michelangelo's Drawings and Paintings in my opinion! After that, Rubens. After that, Pontormo. These are just my three favorite artists that I drool over. But definitely collect books on artists you love and never loan them! :)

Hope these are useful!

~Rebeccak

Rebeccak
07-11-2005, 02:55 PM
AmirP suggested the following book:

"Anatomy Drawing School" (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/3895082899/qid=1121093510/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/102-0070910-5066563?v=glance&s=books&n=507846) book by Andras Szunyoghy and Gyorgy Feher, Its a big one :D

Thanks, AmirP! :)

~Rebeccak

NOOB!
07-11-2005, 09:36 PM
i recommend rebbeca k's books,but they aren't out yet.

*bwuahaha*

Rebeccak
07-12-2005, 02:12 AM
Ah, NOOB! My "secret" book agent on the prowl! ;)

~Rebeccak

fabianv
07-12-2005, 07:14 PM
I would buy all those books If I had some money :D

Books are great.. instructional dvd's are better :D That is why im saving up for Gnomon first :thumbsup:

inky2
10-26-2005, 06:11 AM
Yes, "Anatomy for the Artist", by Jeno Barcsay - Barnes & Noble Books/publisher/-very easy for understending book,very often to use for study in to the artist schools.

PixelColada
10-26-2005, 04:07 PM
Spirit of the Pose (http://spirit-of-the-pose.com/product,page.html) isn't bad.

What do you guys think? Have you seen it?

It's clear that Gnass has been influenced if not taught by Carmean. Personally, I like the freshness of it as I've seen too many people doing too many clean charcoal paintings rather than capturing dynamic gestures. I'm guilty of that myself and I'd like to be leaning back in this direction.

CBee
10-26-2005, 11:33 PM
I noticed that Rebecca has a Bridgeman book on her list. There is also a single volume compilation of 7 of his books called "Bridgman's Complete Guide to Drawing From Life" and it's almost the same price. I haven't checked this book out yet, but it's probably a better buy.

Rebeccak
10-26-2005, 11:37 PM
CBee,

Cool, thanks for that! :) I don't use his books often, but they are very good, particularly for beginners. :) Fooxoo mentioned that she has an original edition of one of his books...very cool! :)

Cheers,

~Rebecca

CBee
10-27-2005, 01:08 AM
That is cool. Not just because it is an original but I also read somewhere that the pictures where better in the original books. :buttrock:

Thanks for the recommendation. :) I'm probably going to pick up the Bridgeman book after I finish Loomis. I'm having fun with Loomis and apparently the two systems are similar, but Bridgeman refines things more. So he seems like a natural next step.

Rebeccak
10-27-2005, 03:01 AM
CBee,

Definitely post your work! As you go along with the books, you may wish to create your own thread, "Anatomy Thread of CBee". :) Then we can all follow your progress ~ I guarantee you will get better with collaborative feedback, as in the Anatomy Reviews! :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

CBee
10-27-2005, 03:38 AM
Heh, probably a good idea. I think making a commitment to post regularly is also a good way to stay focused. I'll start a thread soon... just need to clean things up a bit first. :D

Rebeccak
10-27-2005, 03:49 AM
CBee,

No prob. :) Looking forward to your thread! :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

zhuzhu
10-27-2005, 03:06 PM
maybe wrong thread here, but i need some help there.does anyone know P.Peak? the great artist who have draw the poster of "my fair lady",i really like his drawing, but i have googled it, can't find his drawing or some website. so, if someone get some link, please tell me,thanks~!

PixelColada
10-27-2005, 04:55 PM
Zhuzhu,

His name was Robert Peak and he died years ago.

http://www.bobpeak.com/

zhuzhu
10-28-2005, 02:07 PM
Zhuzhu,

His name was Robert Peak and he died years ago.

http://www.bobpeak.com/


thank you very much~~~!!! that's him~~~!!! i am crazy about his sketch.

Hugh-Jass
11-17-2005, 05:21 PM
www.barcharts.com/default.asp?page=chart_details&gid=2&pid=491-6 (http://www.barcharts.com/default.asp?page=chart_details&gid=2&pid=491-6)

totally random..I saw this laminated anatomy chart in a grocery store of all places for 5.95..it's actually really good reference especially because it's compact and you can keep it pinned up nearby. it's also probably very easy to find for many people and affordable.

Rebeccak
11-18-2005, 12:53 AM
hugh_jass,

Thanks for the link!

Everyone,

>>The books at the beginning of this thread are now all linked.

(to Amazon.com ~ though these books I'm sure can be found elsewhere. Check around for cheapest price).<<


Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

harshdesign
11-30-2005, 08:07 AM
AWESOME...great books rebs and ppl...thought of sharing small collection of "MY PRECIOUSSS" books :)

http://www.harshcg.com/stuff/mybooks01.jpg



The history of world sculpture and Michelangelo are my fav. though all of them are gr8...a must for analog and digital artists.
sorry i dont have online/amazon links of them though...

Rebeccak
11-30-2005, 11:02 AM
harshdeep,

Cool, thanks! I'll have to get that 'Modeling and Sculpting the Human Figure' one! :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

fooxoo
11-30-2005, 05:39 PM
Just got my Hogarth's Drawing Dynamic Hands and Dynamic Figure Drawing - I love it :D:D:D

Rebeccak
11-30-2005, 05:51 PM
Awesome, fooxoo!! Can't wait to see your studies! :D

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

SpeccySteve
12-02-2005, 01:22 PM
The Practice and Science of Drawing by Harold Speed.

Online and free.

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/14264

Rebeccak
12-02-2005, 01:23 PM
SpeccySteve,

Sweet, thanks! :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

CGmonkey
12-03-2005, 01:31 PM
You shouldn't just list books like this, I've got a couple of these books and to be honest, they are not even worthy of mentioning here.

A rating system should be in place (recommended / other books)

Rebeccak
12-03-2005, 01:41 PM
CgMonkey,

Which books do you not like? I understand your opinion. Hmm, it would be hard to have a rating system, as different books work for different people. But I would be really interested in knowing which books you do not like.

Cheers, ;)

~Rebeccak

bono3d
12-10-2005, 05:43 PM
I just got these three:

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y92/faraujo/BOOKS.jpg

Drawing the Human Head (Burne Hogarth)
Drawing Lessons From Great Masters (Robert Beverly Hale)
Modeling the Figure in Clay (Bruno Lucchesi)

My next one will be Artistic Anatomy - Paul Richer
Did I make a good choice?

Rebeccak
12-10-2005, 06:06 PM
bono3d,

Great choices! :applause: I don't have the "Modeling the Figure in Clay" but I'm sure it's good. :)

Check out the work of those who did copies from Richer's book in the CGWorkshop:

http://forums.cgsociety.org/showpost.php?p=2817397&postcount=12

(Workshop participants' thread are noted).

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

bono3d
12-11-2005, 02:11 AM
Nice!
I didn´t resist and got Richer´s book too:
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y92/faraujo/richer.jpg

So, I will be around here for next, let´s say......decades, to learn something from you guys.

BTW, those threads are nice and I hope to learn from them too.

Thanks Rebeccak!

Rebeccak
12-21-2005, 02:42 AM
bono3d,

Sweet! :) I can't recommend that book enough. It's a classic! :thumbsup:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Rebeccak
01-01-2006, 02:04 PM
"The Artist's Complete Guide to Figure Drawing" by Anthony Ryder (artist).

Excellent book, and not too expensive! The artist is a traditional artist working in pencil ~ his work is HIGHLY realistic and beautiful.

Will add this to the first post, as well as a link later.

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

cypherx
01-02-2006, 07:50 PM
Rebecca, firstly, I want to say I think it's great that you're willing to put so much time and effort into helping people.

I just know you're going to say you can't pick a very favorite one, but out of all the books that you have listed, which one would you say is just hands down the best?

Also, which one is good for people with really short attention spans who don't like to read thru books that have any sort of unrelated rambles?

Rebeccak
01-03-2006, 05:23 AM
cypherx,

Thanks, I appreciate your kind words. :) I quite enjoy seeing all of the fantastic activity here, so it doesn't quite feel like work. ;)

It sort of depends on what you are looking for. If you can more specifically describe what you think you need / are your greatest weaknesses, that would help me. :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

adiere
01-03-2006, 10:11 AM
Hi Rebecca,

this is my first post in these forums (cgtalk). I followed and now admire your intense activity in teaching and giving feedback to people here.

I am just a programmer and drawing for me is a hobby.

I took a look on the links to the books you posted and I want to buy one. Can you recommend one for me please?

thanks a lot.

cypherx
01-03-2006, 10:27 AM
hmnnn
ok

I guess I have no trouble drawing what I see, my problem is drawing what I can't see. I'm a science major, but not the science of anatomy, so I would like to become intimate enough with anatomy to do things much like your drawing of the human male knee/leg. Where you're able to see within it, as well as outside of it. So I can stop trying to be a perfectionist (especially when drawing from life, it's easy just to sit there with a photo and "copy" the photo, in real life people are all twitchy!). I have only taken one art class, and the guy who taught it (no names :/) was very very post post modern, and didn't want us drawing anything that resembled an actual person.

SooOoo yeah, I guess I want something that's easy to understand, flows really well, and that helps me get past trying to "copy" the person and allows me to draw the innards and outards of their form. Make any sense?

Rebeccak
01-03-2006, 10:35 AM
cypherx,

Makes perfect sense! :)

2 books I would recommend:

"Vilppu Drawing Manual" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1892053039/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Glenn Vilppu - (self-published)
About Drawing in a methodical, simplified, but beautiful way.

"Anatomy Lessons From The Great Masters" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0823002810/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Robert Beverly Hale and Terence Coyle - Watson Guptill, publisher
Lots of master drawings, which are great to copy. Best way to learn, imo. See Erich / El Chief's Anatomy Thread ~ he is doing copies from this book.

Hope this helps. :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

cypherx
01-03-2006, 10:45 AM
Well I'll give both of them a whirl and let you know
thanks!

Rebeccak
01-03-2006, 08:08 PM
Hi Rebecca,

this is my first post in these forums (cgtalk). I followed and now admire your intense activity in teaching and giving feedback to people here.

I am just a programmer and drawing for me is a hobby.

I took a look on the links to the books you posted and I want to buy one. Can you recommend one for me please?

thanks a lot.
adiere,

Just saw your post. :) I validated it this morning, guess it takes a while to appear. :)

At any rate, welcome to the forums, and thanks for the support! I am thrilled that you have found the forums useful, and hope that you will post your work here. :)

I would say that if you are a beginner, to try Betty Edwards' classic work, The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain (http://about.pricegrabber.com/search_getprod.php/isbn=0874774195/).

Also be sure to check out this Anatomy Forum list of links for Beginners:

(http://forums.cgsociety.org/showpost.php?p=2897666&postcount=2)Resources for Beginners: (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showpost.php?p=2897666&postcount=2)
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showpost.php?p=2897666&postcount=2

I recommend most the Beginner's Lounge and the Drawing On The Right Side of the Brain Workshop ~ both of these threads you are welcome to join at any time.

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

adiere
01-04-2006, 06:18 AM
I've orderd two books on amazon, I'll have them at the end of Jannuary (I'm from romania)
1. Drawing Lessons from the Great Masters: 100 Great Drawings Analyzed, Figure Drawing Fundamentals Defined - Robert Beverly Hale

2. The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain - Betty Edwards

thanks for the advice.

Rebeccak
01-04-2006, 04:49 PM
adiere,

Happy to be of help! I hope you really enjoy your books, once you get them. :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

Elaeria
01-04-2006, 05:00 PM
Has anybody ever looked at "Anatomy for the Artist" by Sarah Simblet?

I bought the book, and it has been interesting for me to go through. I call it "mah big book o' nekkid peoples". Muah haha! :P

At ay rate, here's a link but I would like to hear some feedback from anyone who would like to comment on it. I think it looks pretty good, but being fairly inexperienced at drawing figure anatomy, perhaps someone has a more educated opinion than myself?

ANATOMY FOR THE ARTIST (http://www.powells.com/cgi-bin/biblio/078948045x) by Sarah Simblet

Much appreciated,
Meredith

Rebeccak
01-04-2006, 05:06 PM
Meredith,

I just recently purchased that book, and I have to say that the photographs are beautiful. I have not read through it yet, however, and would be unable to comment on any of the instructional drawing material there.

The book seems mostly a showcase of the photographs, which are certainly worth the money ~ the models are flawless muscular specimens shot in beautiful black and white by an expert photographer ~ in that way, the book seems more like a coffee table photography book than a drawing book, but I'm only judging it as such from the pictures, not the text.

I think it's worth having a variety of books, but I would recommend other books for purely instructional purposes or Anatomical breakdowns.

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

DoctorBone
01-24-2006, 07:27 AM
Excellent book design and great pics Sarah's work is exceptional <> copy and instruction is very average <> but still a worth while book to own <> I also have her other book "Sketchbook For The Artist" same story there <> really great drawings <> hers and many others <> great survey of styles and techniques with wonderful examples <> but not much content in terms of actual
HOW TOs and do like both books and would put they on a recommend list.

BTW it should be no surprise that I own just about everything out there so feel free to ask!

LouisCho
02-21-2006, 03:59 AM
I just got today from amazon the Bridgman Life Drawing.
http://www.booksfirst.co.uk/img/products/02E5EC76.jpg

I seems to be a lot of good information in this little books. Numbers of practice hours. It will be perfect for a beginner like me.

ACantarel
03-21-2006, 11:41 PM
Does anybody know the Books of Gottfried Bammes? A friend (studying art) told me that his books are good for learning and understanding human anatomy.

Unfortunately I only know the german title which is:
"Die Gestalt des Menschen Lehr- und Handbuch der Künstleranatomie"

473 Pages / October 2002

Maybe someone has it and can tell me if it is the right one for me or not?
I´m more a beginner.

At Amazon everybody seems to be happy with it.

Thank you :)

André

Rebeccak
03-22-2006, 12:21 AM
ACantarel,

Hey there, :) I don't have that particular book, but I've certainly heard of it. :) I think generally it's good to have a range of books, and I'm sure that would be an excellent one to have.

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

ACantarel
03-22-2006, 10:20 AM
Hi Rebeccak!

Thank you for the fast answer :) So it´s not so bad to have several books? At first I thought it would be a bit confusing because everybody might have a different style of teaching and beginning.

André

Rebeccak
03-22-2006, 01:56 PM
André,

Yep, the generally held knowledge is that no one book can cover everything anatomy related ~ so it's good to have a number of different books, as they will all contain something a bit different. :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

ACantarel
03-22-2006, 02:38 PM
Ok thanks, so I´ll buy the german one and borrow some others from friends :)

Cheers,

André

umbrellasky
06-02-2006, 07:11 PM
:eek: I'm going to spend a lot of money today :D

Currently working out which books to buy here's my 'definite' list so far:

Bridgman's Complete Guide to Drawing from Life: Over 1,000 Illustrations - George Bridgman;

Dynamic Anatomy-Burne Hogarth

Force:the Key to Capturing Life Through Drawing: -Michael Mattesi

Here's some others I want, but may not be able to afford to add the the list:

Drawing Dynamic Hands-Burne Hogarth

Anatomy Lessons from the Great Masters - Robert Beverly


What do you think? Any here not worth buying? Or any that a more worth buying then some that maybe arn't as good?

Thanks

Rebeccak
06-03-2006, 06:01 AM
enialadam,

Here are the books which I recommend getting in addition to what you are currently purchasing if you can:

"Artistic Anatomy" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0823002977/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Dr. Paul Richer - Watson Guptill, publisher

"Dynamic Anatomy" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0823015521/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Burne Hogarth - Watson Guptill, publisher

"Vilppu Drawing Manual" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1892053039/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Glenn Vilppu - (self-published)
Describes how to break down form simply. Definitely worth getting.

Master Draughtsman Series of Paperback Books: (You don't have to buy them all, but I recommend getting the ones on Michelangelo, Rubens, Harry Carmean (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/ref=br_ss_hs/103-2497184-1739012?platform=gurupa&url=index%3Dstripbooks%3Arelevance-above%26dispatch%3Dsearch%26results-process%3Dbin&field-keywords=Master+Draughtsman+Series&Go.x=15&Go.y=5&Go=Go)
Great books because they are cheap, light, and great for copying from, as you will not be concerned about destroying the book ~ they are really instructional devices, more than anything else.

I don't know about this one: Force:the Key to Capturing Life Through Drawing: -Michael Mattesi (I've not heard of it, but it certainly doesn't mean it's not good).

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

umbrellasky
06-03-2006, 03:40 PM
Thanks Rebecca,

looks like I'm only going to be able to afford around 4 books :

What do you think of this list? I can always buy some of the other later on.

Dynamic Anatomy-Burne Hogarth

Vilppu Drawing Manual-Glenn Vilppi

Bridgman's Complete Guide to drawing from life-George B. Bridgman

Drawings of Michelangelo (Master Draughtsman Series)

Rebeccak
06-03-2006, 04:11 PM
enialadam,

I think that's a great list! :thumbsup:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

akumar
06-29-2006, 07:27 AM
Hi Rebecca

I have been following your artistic and anatomy thread for quite some time and since the time I have joined this forum I have been a very big fan of your hardwork and mainly your artistic skils. I have been drawing for past few months due to the lack of knowledge I have not been able to improve upon my drawing skills especially getting the contours ( human body or any organic form). I have selected a few books from the list u have recomended.

Atlas of Human Anatomy For artist (Stephen Rogers)
Albinus on Anatomy
The New Drawing on the right side of Brain

Are these fine for a beginner if not please recommend any other books so that I can improve my figure drawing skills. I am finding it difficult to select books after I have looked into their reviews.

and sorry for that long piece of text.

thanks a lot BYE.

Rebeccak
06-29-2006, 05:38 PM
Originally posted by akumar: I have selected a few books from the list u have recomended.

Atlas of Human Anatomy For artist (Stephen Rogers)
Albinus on Anatomy
The New Drawing on the right side of Brain

Are these fine for a beginner if not please recommend any other books so that I can improve my figure drawing skills. I am finding it difficult to select books after I have looked into their reviews.
akumar, thank you for the compliments! :) I hope that you will post your work sometime soon to the Anatomy Forum. :)

Regarding books, I think that the following list might be better for a beginner:

The New Drawing on the right side of Brain
Great exercises for the very beginner in drawing

"Vilppu Drawing Manual", by Glenn Vilppu - (self-published)
Breaks down form into simple shapes and describes well how to put them back together

"Artistic Anatomy", by Dr. Paul Richer - Watson Guptill, publisher
A classic text with clear Anatomical plates (drawings)

(perhaps) "Dynamic Anatomy" by Burne Hogarth
Great reference and artist to copy, though I would not recommend drawing in his style ultimately

There are many resources here for beginners! :

Beginners' Lounge (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=297229)

Resources for Beginners (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showpost.php?p=2856632&postcount=2)

Hope this helps! :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

akumar
06-30-2006, 04:32 AM
Thanks Rebecca, I think it now very clear to me what I have to purchase. I soon start posting my work on the anatomy forum as soon as I get a digi cam to photograph some of my recent works.

Bye

d_jnaneswar
07-02-2006, 07:24 AM
How about Andrew Loomis books?


No one mentioned them here (Atleast I didnt see them). Is there any reason? or just that they are not up the snuff?

I have downloaded all of them and am thinking of following them... what do you advice?

And how do you think this book is ? "Figure drawing without a model"

And last but not least, are there anybooks that would help me learn quick gesture drawing? I am a character animator, and although drawing is something i like to do, most of it is used for quick studies in pose and gesture for animation. And usually its exaggerated and cartoony. Are there anybooks that would help me in this line and also with gesture drawing in public?


cheers..
dj

Thomasphoenix
07-02-2006, 12:27 PM
d_jnaneshwar,

Andrew Loomis has been mentioned in Steven Stahlberg's Reference and Tut thread !Loomis is definitely worth studying, but ull need other Anatomy books also.

cheers

Siju

Rebeccak
07-02-2006, 06:12 PM
Originally posted by d_jnaneswar: No one mentioned them here (Atleast I didnt see them). Is there any reason? or just that they are not up the snuff?

I have downloaded all of them and am thinking of following them... what do you advice?
Hi there, :) Loomis is actually mentioned with great frequency on this forum. Someone who has done some incredible Loomis studies and whose thread you should check out is Lyneran:

Anatomy Thread of Lyneran (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=303591)
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=303591

And how do you think this book is ? "Figure drawing without a model"
I don't have this book nor have I seen it personally, but it seems to have a good rating on amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0715306464/sr=8-1/qid=1151863773/ref=sr_1_1/102-8259949-5143308?ie=UTF8) :)

And last but not least, are there anybooks that would help me learn quick gesture drawing? I am a character animator, and although drawing is something i like to do, most of it is used for quick studies in pose and gesture for animation. And usually its exaggerated and cartoony. Are there anybooks that would help me in this line and also with gesture drawing in public?
The established industry drawing for animators master instructor is Glenn Vilppu, whose work you should familiarize yourself with. :)

http://www.vilppustudio.com/

Check out his "Drawing Manual" and his dvds. Additionally, razz has done a number of lovely Vilppu studies on his Anatomy Thread:

Anatomy Thread of razz (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=352287)
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=352287

Definitely check it out, you can also ask razz how he likes Vilppu's work. :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

dreamflow
07-20-2006, 07:02 AM
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b192/dreamflow/art/drawing-the-head-and-figure.jpg

Books from Glenn Vilppu, Gottfried Bammes, Andrew Loomis, Jack Hamm, and more...
(http://basangpanaginip.blogspot.com/2006/01/downloads.html)

EvenHH
11-01-2006, 07:50 AM
I want to learn the anatomy of animals like tigers, lions, hyaena and beers....
What books do I need to get?
What is the best, with bone-structure and real pictures?

Rebeccak
11-03-2006, 05:08 PM
I don't know if this will help or not, but check this book out:

Animals in Motion (Hardcover) by Eadweard Muybridge (http://www.amazon.com/Animals-Motion-Eadweard-Muybridge/dp/0486202038/sr=8-1/qid=1162577227/ref=sr_1_1/102-9838146-8596941?ie=UTF8&s=books) http://www.amazon.com/Animals-Motion-Eadweard-Muybridge/dp/0486202038/sr=8-1/qid=1162577227/ref=sr_1_1/102-9838146-8596941?ie=UTF8&s=books

Intervain
11-13-2006, 05:02 PM
perhaps it has been mentioned before but I couldn't find it :)

I recently came across this book:
Grand cours d'anatomie artistique by András Szunyoghy (http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/701-6383276-2178742?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books-ca&field-author=Andr%C3%A1s%20Szunyoghy),György Fehér (http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/701-6383276-2178742?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books-ca&field-author=Gy%C3%B6rgy%20Feh%C3%A9r)

It's in French but that really doesn't matter - the plates are fantastic [and include humans as well as animals + comparisons]

Piek
11-23-2006, 05:04 PM
Hello, for an in-depth look at anatomy, I'd like to recommend the two volumes of the "Sobotta Atlas of Human Anatomy". These are medical student books, but every page is a full colour plate. Being academic books they are pretty hefty, money-wise - each volume cost me £60 - but I've found them to be worth it. Because they are geared towards medicine, many of the plates have no direct relevance to form - internal systems, blood vessels, nerves etc. But I've found that stuff interesting nonetheless.

Caution: Don't blind buy online, flick through first.

ares623
03-20-2007, 01:37 PM
hello, i just want a quick opinion.
i am looking for an anatomy reference book and my friend has offered me his Atlas of (http://www.amazon.com/Atlas-Human-Anatomy-Artist-Galaxy/dp/0195030958/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4426441-3546515?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174397179&sr=8-1)Human Anatomy for the Artist by Stephen Rogers Peck (http://www.amazon.com/Atlas-Human-Anatomy-Artist-Galaxy/dp/0195030958/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4426441-3546515?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174397179&sr=8-1)
since this is my first time trying to buy a book, and i don't have a lot of money, i really want to know if this book is worth it? (he's selling it at around 22.59 US$, converted.)
thanks for any input. :)

Piek
03-20-2007, 02:19 PM
The printing is a little dark, but that's the only minus in my opinion.

Intervain
03-20-2007, 04:31 PM
I really like Peck's book! lots to learn from!

ares623
03-21-2007, 07:13 AM
thanks for the replies.
:)

Xevious
05-09-2007, 11:04 PM
hello, i just want a quick opinion.
i am looking for an anatomy reference book and my friend has offered me his Atlas of (http://www.amazon.com/Atlas-Human-Anatomy-Artist-Galaxy/dp/0195030958/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4426441-3546515?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174397179&sr=8-1)Human Anatomy for the Artist by Stephen Rogers Peck (http://www.amazon.com/Atlas-Human-Anatomy-Artist-Galaxy/dp/0195030958/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4426441-3546515?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174397179&sr=8-1)
since this is my first time trying to buy a book, and i don't have a lot of money, i really want to know if this book is worth it? (he's selling it at around 22.59 US$, converted.)
thanks for any input. :)

I heard this is an excellent book for beginners.

LordBishop08
06-13-2007, 12:31 PM
Atlas Of Human Anatomy For The Artist By Peck Is One Of My Top Three Study Guides. The Other Two Are Artistic Anatomy And Bridgman's Complete Guide.

ForzaInter
11-21-2007, 10:11 AM
I borrowed Drawing Human Anatomy (http://www.amazon.com/Drawing-Human-Anatomy-Giovanni-Civardi/dp/0289800897/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1195642868&sr=1-1) by Giovanni Civardi from our library and i think it's a pretty good reference book. Begins with the head and some facial expressions and explains every muscle from top to bottom, with drawings of the human figure at the same time.

Thinking of buying an anatomy book, because i think it's a great investment, and will never expire. Any suggestions on which to buy? I'm between the above and the Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist, which i read is a classic.

Thank you :)

Rebeccak
12-21-2007, 08:17 PM
I can't recall if I've added this here, but this book is fantastic:

It features photos of a nude male painted with the muscle striations in different poses. The model is an athlete, and the poses are great. Mainly b/w with some color. I've also added this to the list at the front of the thread:

Visualizing Muscles: A New Ecorché Approach to Surface Anatomy (Paperback) (http://www.amazon.com/Visualizing-Muscles-Ecorch%C3%A9-Approach-Surface/dp/070060426X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1198271373&sr=8-1)
http://www.amazon.com/Visualizing-Muscles-Ecorch%C3%A9-Approach-Surface/dp/070060426X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1198271373&sr=8-1

Rebeccak
12-31-2007, 05:11 PM
I just added this to the master list as well:

"Drawing Animals" by Gary Geraths (http://www.garygeraths.com/purchase.html)
Fantastic drawing book by Otis College of Art Instructor.

Great book, I've recommended it to my students. Loaded with drawings and tips on drawing animals, highly recommended.

kilpatrick
01-05-2008, 11:56 PM
What about Anatomy: A Complete Guide for Artists (http://www.amazon.com/Anatomy-Complete-Artists-Joseph-Sheppard/dp/0486272796/ref=pd_bbs_sr_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1199579898&sr=8-3) by Joseph Sheppard?

Would your recommend it?

Khannalxy'tys
03-11-2008, 02:53 PM
Hello people of the Anatomy forums!

I have recently decided to dwell deeply into the realms of traditional drawing and anatomy studies now that I have still 5 months before I begin my 3D program in modelling and animation. Now, i'm not a true beginner per se, I have had some practice with drawing but nothing very extensive. With that in mind, I thought of buying some instructional books to help my understanding of drawing and a couple of them have sprung to my mind:

- Drawing Lessons from the Great Masters
- Artistic Anatomy by Paul Richer
- Anatomy Lessons from the Great Masters.


I also thought of Burne Hogarth's book but it seems like his proportions and shapes are a little bit altered from reality, are they not?

In any case, which books do you recommend? And if possible, in what order? (I'm one who likes to finish something first and then moving on to the next).

Thanks in advance!

Rebeccak
03-11-2008, 03:50 PM
Hello people of the Anatomy forums!

I have recently decided to dwell deeply into the realms of traditional drawing and anatomy studies now that I have still 5 months before I begin my 3D program in modelling and animation. Now, i'm not a true beginner per se, I have had some practice with drawing but nothing very extensive. With that in mind, I thought of buying some instructional books to help my understanding of drawing and a couple of them have sprung to my mind:

- Drawing Lessons from the Great Masters
- Artistic Anatomy by Paul Richer
- Anatomy Lessons from the Great Masters.


I also thought of Burne Hogarth's book but it seems like his proportions and shapes are a little bit altered from reality, are they not?

In any case, which books do you recommend? And if possible, in what order? (I'm one who likes to finish something first and then moving on to the next).

Thanks in advance!
Hi there, any of these books are fine. I think Drawing Lessons from the Great Masters is a great one to start with but you will be fine starting with any of these. I might also recommend Glenn Vilppu's Drawing Manual.

Khannalxy'tys
03-17-2008, 06:27 PM
Thanks for your help, Rebecca =)

RogerRyan
03-23-2008, 05:22 AM
:thumbsup: Thanks for bringing out the entire library of anatomy books!:)

TremareL
04-21-2008, 05:06 PM
hi, i was wondering witch book would you recomend me for anatomy study for modeling, as me beying a beginner

thanks

Rebeccak
04-22-2008, 08:43 AM
hi, i was wondering witch book would you recomend me for anatomy study for modeling, as me beying a beginner

thanksHi there, I think this book is really good:

Visualizing Muscles: A New Ecorché Approach to Surface Anatomy (Paperback) by John Cody (http://www.amazon.com/Visualizing-Muscles-Ecorch%C3%A9-Approach-Surface/dp/070060426X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1198271373&sr=8-1)
Fantastic reference featuring photos of a model painted with muscle striations. Great book!!!

However, the book doesn't feature the skeletal structure of the body.

Check out the model offered from freedom of teach:

http://freedom-of-teach.com/products/prod_category.php?sect=products&pid=cat_anatomy

For a modeler, that is probably more helpful than a book.

TremareL
04-23-2008, 08:11 AM
Hi there, I think this book is really good:

Visualizing Muscles: A New Ecorché Approach to Surface Anatomy (Paperback) by John Cody (http://www.amazon.com/Visualizing-Muscles-Ecorch%C3%A9-Approach-Surface/dp/070060426X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1198271373&sr=8-1)
Fantastic reference featuring photos of a model painted with muscle striations. Great book!!!

However, the book doesn't feature the skeletal structure of the body.

Check out the model offered from freedom of teach:

http://freedom-of-teach.com/products/prod_category.php?sect=products&pid=cat_anatomy

For a modeler, that is probably more helpful than a book.

The book looks interesting, but the model form freedom of teach it's a bit expensive. and i was thinking more about this book:
"Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195030958/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Stephen Rogers Peck
is it good for me?

Rebeccak
04-23-2008, 05:23 PM
The book looks interesting, but the model form freedom of teach it's a bit expensive. and i was thinking more about this book:
"Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195030958/002-3325844-7329607?v=glance&n=283155&s=books&v=glance), by Stephen Rogers Peck
is it good for me?It's a good book, and I would recommend it. That being said, you will eventually need several anatomy books, as no one book can offer *everything*. That said, I think Peck's book is a good starting point.

As for free resources, check out Bridgman online:

http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?f=177&t=602916

Also Google Gray's Anatomy, there's an online version of just images as well, as well as just tons of online resources (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?f=202&t=257570) regarding anatomy.

bkkm
03-11-2009, 05:37 AM
Hi all,

I have been studying anatomy from a few books (mostly Bridgman, Richer and Peck, coupled with Vanderpoel) and now I am looking for a good book which help me see the origin of each individual relevant muscle and their insertion. I've found that Bridgman's sketches, though illuminating in some other aspects, are not very helpful with this. And it is hard to understand the origin/insertion of each important muscles in Peck and Richer, because they usually appear together with the neighbouring, and often interlaced, muscles. Would you guys recommend any particular book? I can think of three books, and would like to hear what you could say about them:

One is Eliot Goldfinger's Human Anatomy for Artist's. I know it shows each individual muscle separately, and in great detail, but my feeling is that it also shows too many muscles that are not that relevant when depicting the human figure, and this overload of information sometimes not so relevant information may prove convincing. Am I wrong?

The other one is Valerie Winslow's recent Classic Human Anatomy. I haven't been able to look at it, but would be glad to hear people's opinion about it.

The last one is "Albinus on Anatomy", edited by Robert B. Hale and Terence Coyle. Would you say this book is particularly helpful for what I am looking for? I haven't been able to take a look at it either-- I was able to read Hale's foreword to it on Amazon, though, and it sounds promising... Do the plates/descriptions/explanations that follow live up to this promise?

Thanks very much!

Brenno

Kristinkk
07-08-2009, 08:23 AM
Good idea! Thanks for the books :thumbsup:

artmodelandrew
10-09-2009, 06:36 PM
I hope this is an appropriate thread to mention my new book:
The Art Model’s Handbook: The Naked Truth about Posing for Art Classes and Fine Artists.


Figure drawing is a collaborative exercise. The model can better serve artists by understanding why they draw the human figure and what constitutes and interesting pose. Artists and instructors can have a more productive session by understanding the model's perspective and the standard protocols for working with models.

Art Books Reviews senior editor Eileen Morey gives the book 5-stars:
“This book is 141 pages of to-the-point information. There’s no fluff, and the author is knowledgeable, experienced, and addresses issues on both sides of the canvas (or sketchpad)… If there’s anything missing from this book — from either the model or artist’s standpoint — I can’t see it. And, I’m speaking as a third-generation artist who worked as an artist’s model during her college years.”

Only $16.95 on Amazon.com. More reviews, table of contents, and ordering information can be found at http://www.artmodelbook.com/index.htm

longhi
10-09-2009, 11:32 PM
Really good Thread guys!

Well, I have on my website a list of my books, I`m always putting more stuff there...
Drop me a message anytime for any reason.

http://longhifineart.com/blog/?page_id=390

Hope I can learn a lot with you folks.

Cya around

Best Regards from Brazil.

parka81
10-21-2009, 02:58 AM
Hi all,

I have been studying anatomy from a few books (mostly Bridgman, Richer and Peck, coupled with Vanderpoel) and now I am looking for a good book which help me see the origin of each individual relevant muscle and their insertion. I've found that Bridgman's sketches, though illuminating in some other aspects, are not very helpful with this. And it is hard to understand the origin/insertion of each important muscles in Peck and Richer, because they usually appear together with the neighbouring, and often interlaced, muscles. Would you guys recommend any particular book? I can think of three books, and would like to hear what you could say about them:

One is Eliot Goldfinger's Human Anatomy for Artist's. I know it shows each individual muscle separately, and in great detail, but my feeling is that it also shows too many muscles that are not that relevant when depicting the human figure, and this overload of information sometimes not so relevant information may prove convincing. Am I wrong?

The other one is Valerie Winslow's recent Classic Human Anatomy. I haven't been able to look at it, but would be glad to hear people's opinion about it.

The last one is "Albinus on Anatomy", edited by Robert B. Hale and Terence Coyle. Would you say this book is particularly helpful for what I am looking for? I haven't been able to take a look at it either-- I was able to read Hale's foreword to it on Amazon, though, and it sounds promising... Do the plates/descriptions/explanations that follow live up to this promise?

Thanks very much!

Brenno

Bridgman's books are more for conceptualizing mass and form.

(All links below are to some pictures of the books on my blog.)

Goldfinger's Human Anatomy for Artist (http://parkablogs.com/content/book-review-human-anatomy-artists-elements-of-form) is a comprehensive anatomy reference book. It shows lots of individual parts in drawings and accompanying photos. What's lacking might be whole figure illustrations.

Classic Human Anatomy (http://parkablogs.com/content/book-review-classic-human-anatomy-artists-guide-form-function-and-movement) by Valarie Winslow is pretty good. It shows the essentials that contribute to surface form. For the price, it's well worth the money.

Another reference book you want to check out should be Human Anatomy for Artists (http://parkablogs.com/content/book-review-human-anatomy-artists) by Andras Szunyoghy. Very big and detailed illustrations.

I can't say about Albinus on Anatomy because I don't have that book yet. But I've seen a few pictures before and they look great.

parka81
10-21-2009, 03:10 AM
I've a couple of anatomy books reviewed (http://parkablogs.com/content/anatomy-and-figure-drawing-books-artists) on my blog complete with some pictures and a page flipping video. I'm also still learning drawing as well.

Hope they will be helpful.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2783/4030366851_d7673b1c41.jpg (http://parkablogs.com/content/anatomy-and-figure-drawing-books-artists)

Dingoo
11-17-2010, 12:06 PM
Ok seriously, isnt there some easier book to get started with?

I've got 5 of the books recommended here, all of which got high reviews everywhere I looked. But none of these actually feel like they're really for beginners ( even though some reviews say otherwise ). Isnt there some book out there that covers a few general things to help you slowly get started on the topic of anatomy rather than covering you in a huge pile of technical terms and details from the start? Because personally I dont feel like any of the books I read are really accessible to the average artist.

mister3d
11-20-2010, 12:34 PM
Hi all,

I have been studying anatomy from a few books (mostly Bridgman, Richer and Peck, coupled with Vanderpoel) and now I am looking for a good book which help me see the origin of each individual relevant muscle and their insertion. I've found that Bridgman's sketches, though illuminating in some other aspects, are not very helpful with this. And it is hard to understand the origin/insertion of each important muscles in Peck and Richer, because they usually appear together with the neighbouring, and often interlaced, muscles. Would you guys recommend any particular book? I can think of three books, and would like to hear what you could say about them:

One is Eliot Goldfinger's Human Anatomy for Artist's. I know it shows each individual muscle separately, and in great detail, but my feeling is that it also shows too many muscles that are not that relevant when depicting the human figure, and this overload of information sometimes not so relevant information may prove convincing. Am I wrong?


Yes, you are wrong. First of all, he shows not all muscles, but only key important ones. i.e. he skips some deep muscles which Barchai for example lists. Still I believe Elliot does a better job, as Barchai lists some redundant which do not affect the outer form. And yes, you need to learn them all, which Goldfinger lists, if you want to draw/model well. Anatomy courses in our academy of arts take 2 years, one year for bones and the other one for muscles. Sure you can learn it faster as in academy they also learn 10 other courses. So you can memorize all those muscles in several months of learning.

I chose 3 books, which serve me well: Bammes, Goldfinger and Barchai (Barchai just because it's in Russian and I kind of got used to it as used it from the school). I believe Bammes old prints (1982) and Goldfinger's "human anatomy for artist: the elements of form" are two serious sources for those who are at the level of studying anatomy thoroughly. When I started, I liked form figure drawing books, but then you realize until you learn all the bones and muscles origin and insertion you won't get far. Still, I believe there's no ideal book, and each person may like different one.

TheSkorax
04-25-2012, 03:27 AM
Bridgman's books are more for conceptualizing mass and form.

(All links below are to some pictures of the books on my blog.)

Goldfinger's Human Anatomy for Artist (http://parkablogs.com/content/book-review-human-anatomy-artists-elements-of-form) is a comprehensive anatomy reference book. It shows lots of individual parts in drawings and accompanying photos. What's lacking might be whole figure illustrations.

Classic Human Anatomy (http://parkablogs.com/content/book-review-classic-human-anatomy-artists-guide-form-function-and-movement) by Valarie Winslow is pretty good. It shows the essentials that contribute to surface form. For the price, it's well worth the money.

Another reference book you want to check out should be Human Anatomy for Artists (http://parkablogs.com/content/book-review-human-anatomy-artists) by Andras Szunyoghy. Very big and detailed illustrations.

I can't say about Albinus on Anatomy because I don't have that book yet. But I've seen a few pictures before and they look great.

I have to second your opinion on Classic Human Anatomy (http://www.amazon.com/Classic-Human-Anatomy-Function-Movement/dp/0823024156/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1335324226&sr=8-1) by Valarie Winslow

I have this book and it is really really good. I can't stress that enough. It goes through the skull, torso, arms, hands, legs, and feet picking out the bones as well as showing its structure in front, back and side view in skeletal and muscular forms.

mortezashad
06-27-2012, 12:48 PM
HI DEAR REBECCAK

I'm just looking to a few free books can be found through internet. I guess 1 or 2 references are enough. is it possible?
can you give me the links? I've red your references. but they're too much. as you said it's not necessary to read all but which of them are the best? can i download them free?

AutoRunFail
07-18-2014, 11:17 PM
I didn't see that anyone had posted this, so I thought I would mention that if you are doing Figure Drawing, the book Figure Drawing: Design and Invention by Michael Hampton ((http://www.amazon.com/Figure-Drawing-Invention-Michael-Hampton/dp/0615272819/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1405725278&sr=1-1&keywords=figure+drawing+design+and+invention)) is an excellent resource, works like a class, and is much used by many in the illustration/concept art industry. It goes into gesture drawing and drawing the figure and is also works through analytical figure drawing which deals with the actual breakdown of anatomy within the figure.

I have also found the Force series by Mike Mattesi ((http://www.amazon.com/Force-Dynamic-Life-Drawing-Animators/dp/0240808452)) a great resource for animating and concept art, though the style is admittedly looser and less anatomical.