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Armanguy
07-05-2005, 06:28 AM
Im trying to join a mod and they asked me to do some quick sketches to see my skills what do you guys think?

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v92/armanguy/scan0004.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v92/armanguy/scan0003.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v92/armanguy/scan0002.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v92/armanguy/scan0001.jpg

i know i need to work on the porportions but what else should i work on? i dont have wacom so i just doodle them scan them into my como and take my time detailing them:)

commodore
07-05-2005, 09:27 AM
Wacom? You don't need a wacom for drawing. It's better to draw with the good old pencil.

Armanguy
07-05-2005, 10:03 AM
i agree but it would make it easier when i put it in the computer instead of using the mouse.

Armanguy
07-05-2005, 08:13 PM
+friendly bump+

no comments or crits?

CodeNothing
07-05-2005, 11:00 PM
Its all line work.

To design characters, environments, etc, you need the artwork to look 3d even though its on a 2D surface. The more 3D the concept looks the better your client will visualise the model in the game, and the less the modeler will need to think when actualy modeling it.

A good example would be trying to model the simpsons. The style of the simpsons is very simple line work with simple filled colors. There is no shading so it appears as very flat (graphic) artwork. when modelers attempt to make models of them they usualy turn out very awkward if viewed at certain angles. This is because there was not enough structural information given from the cartoons.

You need to get a much more "painterly" style of art done to show the structure of the models, not just the details. In fact details are the least important aspect of any piece. Its just eye candy. You should go take some figure drawing classes, and look at work by creig mullins ( goodbrush.com ) and see how SIMPLE his brush strokes are, but he gets everything looking totaly solid. He also doesnt add tons of details, he just implys them.

good luck!

kraal
07-05-2005, 11:21 PM
i would suggest learning the basics of drawing .... forget the wacom, forget the internet tutorials, forget the gnomon dvd's and learn the basics.... head over to your local library and find some art books that teach methods of drawing and study i still have books i was lucky enough to recieve from my grandfather at a young age by the grumbacher library which include ' drawing animals' ' landscape painting' and 'art of drawing' all published in 1965 and to this day i would sell my whole gnomon analog colection before i give any of these away.....

StylusMonkey
07-05-2005, 11:33 PM
Its all line work.

To design characters, environments, etc, you need the artwork to look 3d even though its on a 2D surface. The more 3D the concept looks the better your client will visualise the model in the game, and the less the modeler will need to think when actualy modeling it.

A good example would be trying to model the simpsons. The style of the simpsons is very simple line work with simple filled colors. There is no shading so it appears as very flat (graphic) artwork. when modelers attempt to make models of them they usualy turn out very awkward if viewed at certain angles. This is because there was not enough structural information given from the cartoons.

You need to get a much more "painterly" style of art done to show the structure of the models, not just the details. In fact details are the least important aspect of any piece. Its just eye candy. You should go take some figure drawing classes, and look at work by creig mullins ( goodbrush.com ) and see how SIMPLE his brush strokes are, but he gets everything looking totaly solid. He also doesnt add tons of details, he just implys them.

good luck!

100% totally agreed.

I'm doing pretty much what you want to do arman, I'm a lead concept artist for a video game company and although you can get away with simple line drawings, in my experience the more "descriptive" your illustrations can be, the better the modellers can create your imaginings.

I have a jr artist under me who is an "anime" illustrator *sigh* and her work is exaggerated and heavy lined and is just not condusive towards game asset creation because she cannot understand the fact that she needs to be more descriptive.

When I hand concepts over to 3d artists, I have to do minimal communication because it is described to a T, this saves time and if much more efficient. If your work isn't descriptive enough, you'll spend half your time explaining what you want - you should be able to draw orthographic views to an accurate degree too, and be able to make completely profiled drawings appear 3 dimensionally.

This field isn't for everyone, its challenging in its time constraints but you still need to be able to develop work that is of a high quality - for instance I judge my work harshly, if I would not show it in public, then I haven't done my job.

The biggest thing about game design is the ability to generate designs at the speed of thought, originality and pen men ship and you need to develop techniques to get you through the workflow as quickly as possible. You'll get this only by observing the pros, emulating then finding your own niche.

I'd heavily suggest learning to use marker.

Ducklator
07-05-2005, 11:41 PM
as said magic, kraal n' codenothing, you must work more in this sketch. It's like guy's notebook in a boring class... if you try to work in something important, try to do a best job in..:)

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