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THECLYKE
07-02-2005, 02:37 PM
GREETINGS FELLOW CG TALKERS

Line,shape,form,colour,value,texture,space

:) What does that mean to you ?

NOOB!
07-02-2005, 02:40 PM
the annoying techniques it takes to become a great artist.

offbeatworlds
07-02-2005, 07:03 PM
Something I may think about when painting, and a couple of terms that people like to use when giving critiques. :p

nebezial
07-02-2005, 07:48 PM
Line, the first spur of the moment elemental outburst of ideas i guess
shape... something to be aware off.. to be calculated in physical space
form... seriously dunno bout that one
colour, essential language... makes things pop out through saturation and warmth
value... beats me
texture... in onw word FUN
space the most difficult thing to acchieve

ashakarc
07-02-2005, 08:20 PM
Line: Abstract manifestation of form
Shape: Coded arrangement of lines reduced from its context
Form: Conscious subject that entails a meaning within time-space Fold
Colour: Poetic existence of the Immaterial Cognito and light
Value: Spatio-temporal description of the inbetween intensities
Texture: The driving force of evolution and the essence of structural difference
Space: The Fold whereby nothingness exist
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Ariel
07-02-2005, 08:27 PM
To my understanding these are the most fundamental and essential elements of visual design.

Line is just a connection of 2 points and it can be straight or curve. There are many types of line, but most lines can be simplified and represented by a combination of straight curves.

Shape is the first thing that you see, in 2d. Basically the silhoutte of something. Shapes are usually very simple at first sight and they easily give us the length, width and proportions of any given subject. There are also light shapes and shadow shapes, etc.

Value is how light or dark something is. Value can be determined by the local tone or color of something or by how light interacts with something (creating highlights, halftones and shadow).

Form is what gives something the look of being 3d. It happens in the areas of an object where shadow turns into light, revealing the 'topography' or elevations of the surface of something. Subtle gradations of value usually represent smooth surfaces,like a sphere, while sharper shifts in value show surfaces that have solid and sudden plane changes, like a box or bony areas of the body.

Color is both value and hue. I think it includes how light or dark something is, plus what 'tint' and saturation something has.

Texture, I think, has to do with surface detail and includes things like how rough or smooth, or how even or irregular a surface is. Another term also used for texture is noise. Design can be achieved by creating interesting noise patterns, which have combinations of busy parts and other areas of rest.

Space, in my opinion has to do with composition and arrrangement of elements in a picture plane as well as the illusion of 3dimensional depth through the use of linear and aerial perspective.

THECLYKE
11-02-2005, 11:28 AM
Wow It's Funny How Every Body Has There Own Opinion To This...lol

RO
11-02-2005, 11:54 AM
That is because art is not a science. Art is based on theory (theory=openion with a little more info) mostly when doing a formal critique or when making peices. I have seen plenty of works that follow a lot of the rules of composition/color/etc and are technically great pieces but it still does not captivate me.

Areil has the closest text book definition of the words though.

I like the definition Neb put of color being the essential language. Colors hold feelings and can be symbolic.

THECLYKE
11-28-2005, 01:30 AM
WOW LOVE THE FEED BACK YALL KEEP IT COMING
ANYBODY CARE TO SHOW DIGITAL EXSAMPLES OF FOLOWING THE
Line,shape,form,colour,value,texture,space PRICIPALS.

Kyena
12-02-2005, 01:00 PM
Actually - art theory is somewhat a science. There is a lot of Logic and Physics you need to know in order to really understand what's going on. I also think that there are certain rules to why an illustration works or works not.

I think Ariel pretty much nailed the overall description of the terms. Here are some of my thoughts (wether they are right or wrong...dunno :D)

LINE
Theoretical description:
"Line is just a connection of 2 points and it can be straight or curve. There are many types of line, but most lines can be simplified and represented by a combination of straight curves"

In regards to art:
Lines are specially important for special kind of art (drawings, comics, inking).
Line weight is particularly important in this case. Even lines make for a boring effect as where as different line-weight can make something more interesting. Besides it is used to hint at shapes (this would go towards inking and that would be a whole little section on its own :)) Depending on what you want to achieve/say the left or the right might be more interesting. Sometimes you don't even have to draw the whole line but a hint of an ending works much better.

http://www.tascha.ch/wordpress/tutorials/theory/lines.gif

Kyena
12-02-2005, 01:06 PM
VALUES:
Theoretical description:
"Value is how light or dark something is. Value can be determined by the local tone or color of something or by how light interacts with something (creating highlights, halftones and shadow)."

In regards to art:
Values are probably the most important aspects to consider. They are also the reason that we like black and white illustrations a lot. It is much harder to achieve the right values with colors. This is mainly the case because the more value something has the less hue of the actual color it shows. I hope I am not wrong here but most of the time we just use "brightness" instead of value. However Value is actually the relationship between the brightness of one color in regards to another.

Look at this gif: The grey a middle value and it's exactly the same on both sides (128, 128, 128 - a neutral grey): It does look warmer while surrounded by cold colors and appears to be colder while surrounded by warm colors. That means if some elements have the same value they will react on the hue of the surrounding elements instead if you compare them.

http://www.tascha.ch/wordpress/tutorials/theory/values1.gif


Values are extremely important in regards to texture and surfaces as well, how objects interact and to create forms.

It's always a good trick to desaturate your painting to check how your values are. In general you should have the biggest value contrast around the center of interest because your eye gets drawn to that point automatically. In general you should have most values in the mid range, then less in dark and lighter values. (highlight and shadows).
I think you could write a whole book about values only but generally make sure you have a the whole range from very dark to very light in your painting.

Values are also sometimes tricky to "see correctly" since our brain makes us think that we see a different value than it actually is. That is particularly hard to see if you look at something with a smooth value transient - now tell me you are not a tiiiiiiiiny bit surprised how big the difference from value a to value b is on the bottom bar?

http://www.tascha.ch/wordpress/tutorials/theory/values.jpg

Kyena
12-02-2005, 01:39 PM
SHAPE and FORM:
Theoretical description:
"Shape is the first thing that you see, in 2d. Basically the silhoutte of something. Shapes are usually very simple at first sight and they easily give us the length, width and proportions of any given subject. There are also light shapes and shadow shapes, etc."

"Form is what gives something the look of being 3d. It happens in the areas of an object where shadow turns into light, revealing the 'topography' or elevations of the surface of something. Subtle gradations of value usually represent smooth surfaces,like a sphere, while sharper shifts in value show surfaces that have solid and sudden plane changes, like a box or bony areas of the body."

Art wise:
Shapes can be a great help to create a more appealing image. I tend to sketch in shadow/shape figures to check if a character or an object may look interesting (sorry for the crappy quality). You will also see that as soon as I add some values (in this case some grayscale elements) you actually start to see shapes and surfaces/textures thus the actual elements get more defined.

http://www.tascha.ch/wordpress/tutorials/theory/shape_form1.jpg

Forms are defined by values. If you add values to a shape you automatically create a form and it's surface.

http://www.tascha.ch/wordpress/tutorials/theory/shape_form.jpg

Kyena
12-02-2005, 02:08 PM
COLORS:
Theoretical approach:
" Color is both value and hue. I think it includes how light or dark something is, plus what 'tint' and saturation something has."

Artistic:
uhohh...ok...hmm...way too much to write here. Nothing about how colors work together or how they influence themselves but how they basically get created mayhaps?

Light is the main reason we see colors. Basically if something looks green it means that all other light hues get absorbed and only the green parts of the spectrum gets bounced off into our eyes. That is also the reason you should always have your ambient color in mind..because that is technically light that bounces off everywhere and influences all of the basic hues in your painting.

For me while painting I define colors by three main elements:
Hue, saturation and value (or to simplify it - brightness).
In Photoshop if you have the window with the color tab open you can chose to work with exactly those three elements. If you are not already working with the HSB (rings a bell?) Slider - you can go and click the little arrow at the top right to open a little menu and chose "HSB".

http://www.tascha.ch/wordpress/tutorials/theory/hsb.jpg

Hue is basically what we normally call "color". You name it: yellow, orange, purple, pink...
Saturation means how much of the actual hue there is in the color. Screaming pink or neon colors are good examples for extreme saturation.
Value we already covered :)

There is so much to colors..warm colors, cold colors, how they interact, complementary colors..yadda yadda..too much to write about really.

Besides color's are also a matter of taste and personal style. They help tell your story in a painting and can create certain feelings in the viewer.
The can be like a character to your story.

Some more in depth information about light and shadows can be found here (http://tascha.ch/wordpress/?page_id=38).

Rebeccak
12-02-2005, 02:15 PM
Kyena, darling, :)

Want to do a kick a** tutorial on the Anat. Forum? :bowdown::arteest::beer:

Payment = *hugs* :)

Cheers,

~Rebeccak

umbrellasky
12-02-2005, 05:52 PM
Great comments everyone! :)

:eek: wow Tascha!!! that was a really interesting read. Thanks for going into so much depth, really cleared a few things up for me.

Rebeccak
12-02-2005, 06:16 PM
*Hugs* granted! :D :deal: :)

Kyena
12-04-2005, 04:53 PM
Well, I just had the time to address some of the elements quick. I am about to write a pretty in depth explanation about my thoughts about theory with better and more examples too.

It's all Becca's fault :D

Rebeccak
12-04-2005, 04:55 PM
*Accepts responsibility with a smile* :D

Lookin' forward to it, Natascha! :bounce:

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Ariel
12-05-2005, 12:02 AM
Well, I just had the time to address some of the elements quick. I am about to write a pretty in depth explanation about my thoughts about theory with better and more examples too.

It's all Becca's fault :D

Before you do so... :), I'd really like to encourage you and the rest of the artists on this thread to give a good look at this page:

http://www.fineart.sk/index.php?s=0&cat=13

It's Andrew Loomis' Creative Illustration Online. The main question asked on this thread is answered in full detail and with very good examples. It actually has chapters named: line, tone (value), color, composition, etc.. all the basics are covered.

Also, you can check out on e-bay the 'Famous Artists Course on Design and Illustration'. It is out of print but you can still find it on auction sites for around $50. It has exercises and step-by-step tutorials, while also covering the theory pretty in-depth as well.

Rebeccak
12-05-2005, 12:40 AM
Ariel,

Hehe, I for one would still like to hear what Kyena / Natascha has to say on the subject ~ :) ~ Loomis is great, but Natascha is an artist of the digital age, and times have changed, though of course, the basic principles remain the same.

Plus, I've had to beg dear Natascha to do a tutorial ~ don't dissuade her! :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

Ariel
12-05-2005, 03:51 AM
Ariel,

Hehe, I for one would still like to hear what Kyena / Natascha has to say on the subject ~ :) ~ Loomis is great, but Natascha is an artist of the digital age, and times have changed, though of course, the basic principles remain the same.

Plus, I've had to beg dear Natascha to do a tutorial ~ don't dissuade her! :)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

oh, I wasn't trying to dissuade her at all. But for the sake of this discussion, Loomis has all the answers that 'The Clyke' was seeking.

I'd be really interested in her tutorial as well!

Rebeccak
12-05-2005, 03:53 AM
Hehe, no prob! :) Our dear Kyena is a bit shy about posting is all. ;)

Cheers, :)

~Rebeccak

umbrellasky
12-05-2005, 10:11 PM
hehe. I look forward to the tutorial Tascha :)

THECLYKE
12-03-2006, 12:58 AM
HEHE...LOVE THE ANSWERS.
:thumbsup:

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