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ReaperXVIII
07-06-2005, 05:19 AM
I just remembered that I had another question, if you don't mind answering.

I was just watching the making of Finding Nemo on the dvd today, and Mr. Stanton said that all of the animators had to become SCUBA certified. I assume since you were one of them that you got certified. Did you enjoy it? What level of certification are you at and are you continuing to SCUBA or do you not have enough time? I'm asking because I'm advanced certified (diving in the Bahamas ;) ) and I always enjoy hearing from other SCUBA divers. :)

Thanks for answering my other question. Even though you couldn't really answer my main question I appreciate you taking time out to give me something. It means a lot to a beginner like myself. :)

vnavone
07-06-2005, 05:21 AM
What is your thought about character design and style in reference to enable story telling?

In character animation acting as oppose to real actor acting, is overacting a good thing? when you use yourself for reference, do you emphasize, go over the top in expression?

What makes a good voice actor? what does Pixar look for when they hire a well known actor for their voices, and do they film them as well as voice recording for references material?Here are my thoughts on animation and character design: Animation is by nature an abstract medium that has endless opportunities for stylization and experimentation. Everything on the screen in an animated feature must be designed and rendered from scratch, so why not try to make a creative statement, other than "doesn't this look real?". I think realism in animation is just lazy design. Animation is not about reproducing real life, it's about distilling, simplifying, exaggerating. Just as a caricature drawing can look more like a person than a photograph of that person, so animation can feel more believable than a live-action performance. Just as a painting can say more about a subject than a photograph of the same subject. The more stylized and abstract the animation and design the more the audience can suspend their disbelief and surrender to the metaphor. This is the power of animation. So to answer your question about acting, we may exaggerate but we try not to over-act. We want the acting to feel natural, but also simplified and clarified.
Good voice actors visually suggest a character to you in your mind. When you listen to Ellen Degeneres or Frank Oz or Robin Williams you can see the performance in your head and it's a joy to animate to. We look for actors who's voices fit the characters and inspire the animators. They do video record the dialog sessions so that the animators can look at them for reference, if needed. Some actors performances are good reference and some aren't.

vnavone
07-06-2005, 05:25 AM
I know that family is important to you. Do you sometimes think that you could be even better at animation if you hid yourself in your work, or do you think that your animation would suffer if you didn't have so much human based experience from which to draw inspiration?

Also, do you involve yourself in sport? I have noticed that a lot of good animators are quite physically active.Hi John, I think it's important for an animator (or any artist) to have a real life outside of his work. It is real life that informs our work, and the people we are trying to communicat with exist in the real world, so we need to have the same constant frame of reference. Real life makes for great inspiration, too.

I play volleyball, but I'm not very good. I used to be pretty good at pingpong but I haven't played in a couple of years.

vnavone
07-06-2005, 05:28 AM
So dare I say it? You can sometimes get away with more in acting pieces than game animation because its easy to judge full body-animation, yet small subtleties in acting stuff arent always seen (or arent as blantantly obvious to criticize). In other words, making a talking head is cake compared to a good run cycle, even when that talking head is perfectly animated. Sure, games dont have the huge exposure and pedigree-audience that film has, but the artists devloping them still strive for top-notch animation, and in many cases have to work harder due to more limitations. Yeah, I guess I feel game animators dont get enough street cred. Don't forget, we can act too. ;)I'm not at all belittling the work that game animators do. I'm just saying you need more breadth on your reel if you want to get a job at a film studio.

vnavone
07-06-2005, 05:33 AM
Like Frank Thomas, Olie Johnston, Milt Kahl, Richard Williams, Tex Avery, and other great animators that inspired us, our generation since 1930's. Now, you, Bobby Beck, Carlos Baena, and many other cool guys from Pixar, or Dreamworks, or ILM, or Weta is inspiring next generation animators. How does it feel to be considered among one of the most "inspiring" animators? Do you feel like a celebrity sometimes?I don't consider myself to be even remotely near the caliber or reputation of those artists. I've only been animating for about 7 years and I've got a long way to go to earn that kind of mantle. I do enjoy a certain amount of internet celebrity but I think that's mostly because I make an effort to have a web presence and answer email. Believe me, I haven't met any hot chicks because of my "celebrity".
I know that many artists are suffering from Procrastination. Do you Procrastinate when working/animating? If so, do you find a way to deal with it. If I have a shot on my desk that doesn't interest me then I may take longer to start than I should, but I remember that they're paying me to do this so I buckle down and get to work!

vnavone
07-06-2005, 05:38 AM
when you started animating with Pixar. Did you realize a hightened sense that you may not have been able to come up with their demands for high quality animation. Did you have a hard time adjusting or was it easy to make excellent consistent work from the start of your company career?I'm never able to make consistent, excellent work. I make lots of mistakes and have to work really hard. I've always had to work hard since the beginning, and luckily I've gotten better at what I do. I started out doing background characters on Monsters, Inc. and with the help of the director and other animators I steadily improved and was assigned better shots. I'm always worried that I wont be able to satisfy the director. The fear inspires me.

vnavone
07-06-2005, 05:39 AM
1st off, you're awesome, i love alien song and all the pixar movies. What would you try to do or focus on if you were a 16 year old hoping to become a character animator, what roads would you take, how should i approach my dream?Thanks, Anthony. Check out my web page for some advice:
http://www.navone.org/HTML/3dadvice.htm

vnavone
07-06-2005, 05:44 AM
In the bio it stated that you started out as a traditional artist. Do you have some of your earlier drawings or paintings around the time you started art school and the time you finished? I think it would be great to see what kind of a great 2d artist you were before you hit the computers.I wouldn't say I was a "great" 2d artist, but you can see some of my traditional work on my web site.

vnavone
07-06-2005, 05:46 AM
I was just watching the making of Finding Nemo on the dvd today, and Mr. Stanton said that all of the animators had to become SCUBA certified. I assume since you were one of them that you got certified. Did you enjoy it? What level of certification are you at and are you continuing to SCUBA or do you not have enough time? Only the department leads got SCUBA certified. I got certified on my own during production but I only went diving a few times during my vacation in Maui.

michaeljr
07-06-2005, 06:39 AM
I just want to say hi... I doubt you remember me, but I can remember way back, maybe 6 or 7 years ago on CgChar list, actually giving you critiques on your Alien Song short. Can you believe that? I bet I have rough animations of that on a CD somewhere. You amazed a lot of people back then and look how far you have come.

Did you ever expect to hear someone say they got into animation because of you?

I just want to say congrads on sticking with it and working hard through it all. You remind me a lot of my bro-in-law, whom you may remember or even know, Michael Comet. How far you guys have come over the years. I'm an example what not to do, get stuck worring about computer speeds, fancy fx, and wanting to learn it all. what's the old saying, Jack of All Trades, but Master of None. always learning but never doing. all you kiddies out there take look at Victor as an example of how to succedd at this..

anyway, now that I'm a bit more mature if my attitude towards animation (ie, I ain't wasting time worring how fast my computer is anymore), you have re-inspired me to try even harder and stick with it, just like you did years ago when you made Alien Song and the inspiration and enjoyment I got from that...

good luck to ya Victor, I hope one day to meet ya, shake your hand, and maybe spike a vollyball at ya....

AndyH
07-06-2005, 10:36 AM
Congratulations on the incredibles - its my fave 3d animated movie yet, and a huge inspiration for me!
Im not much of an animator, more of a character modeler, but part of my job entails the creation of morph targets.
To create the superbly supple and flexible facial animation for the incredibles, did you use morphs or bones? And if you used morphs, how many phonemes and expression targets does the average main character use?
Also, do the character modelers make everything from scratch using polys, or are they scanned in from sculptures/ maquettes?

avmani
07-06-2005, 01:04 PM
HI Navone!:bounce:

I'm glad to have this opportunity to be with u here .

u and Carlos Baena are my all time favorite and inspiration artists in this industry.

Right now i'm working as texturing & matte painting artist.If i have to work in company like pixar what they would expect in my show reel and how many years i should have as experiance? because i don't know anything about animation and all.So can u explain me about how my show reel has to be? and how should i prepare to get in to?

thanks for u and CGtalk for this nice opportunity.

manuel
07-06-2005, 01:17 PM
Hi Manuel, I don't know anything about the Disney stuff you mention, but I do seem to recall reading about some experiments carried out by Nazi scientists involving implanting USB ports directing into the animator's cerebral cortex. Anyway, I use a mouse and a wacom tablet for my work, but nothing as fancy as a Cintiq. There's always room for improvement in animation UI's. We've got some pretty neat tools in the pipe.

Silly nazi's, they should have used firewire.

vnavone
07-06-2005, 04:07 PM
To create the superbly supple and flexible facial animation for the incredibles, did you use morphs or bones? And if you used morphs, how many phonemes and expression targets does the average main character use?
Also, do the character modelers make everything from scratch using polys, or are they scanned in from sculptures/ maquettes?Hi Andy, we don't use morph targets. The faces are rigged with special deformers that allow the animators more control over every part of the face. Some of the models are scanned directly from sculpts but many are just made by referencing drawings and sculpts.

csDevil
07-06-2005, 04:16 PM
hey, victor!

1- Can you improvise when animating at pixar?

2- Have you ever tried some crazy experiments in 3D like doing a Tex Avery-like animation? if yes, what did you get?

3- Few top notch professionals are popular or even present in internet forums. Why is that so?


thx =)
-Daniel

cJaynes
07-06-2005, 04:26 PM
Wow, thanks so much for this, you are doing a great job and giving some awesome answers.

1) You've gotten the question already about having free time and you say you do ( not crazy hours), but are you really the exception or the norm. Kind of wondering about maybe the tool and effects guys. I can imagine they put in some long hours?

2) Also this was bothering me I was watching the indredibles this weekend for the God knows what time, but one of my friends asked me something and I was like ummmmm. So is mirage a super? It alludes to it but I can't find anything anywhere... just bothered me cause I never thought it. Oh well.

Thanks! Keep up the awesome work!

AndyH
07-06-2005, 04:46 PM
A few more questions, if its ok:


1 - What is general office life like at pixar? Do you practically give up your life while working on a production, or do you get plenty of time to focus on your shots and get them looking good at your own pace?

2 - Is the general office as 'cool' as it seems? The featurettes on DVDs show the office to be a spectacular place to work, with numerous recreational areas, 'themed' rooms, bars, and other non-officey things - you even have an office monkey! Is it like this really? Are the 'true' studios held in an underground bunker in a shabby, windowless factory where workers are chained to the desks and fed moldy bread and dirty water?

ahem - got a bit carried away there.....

;)

Kwago
07-06-2005, 04:57 PM
Hi Andy, we don't use morph targets. The faces are rigged with special deformers that allow the animators more control over every part of the face.

can you elaborate more on this? can you provide any insight as to what kind of controls the proprietary software you use at Pixar for facial animation usually provides? too bad posting screenshots are probably forbidden but damn i'd love to get a look at how the app looks like 8]

agreenster
07-06-2005, 05:44 PM
I'm not at all belittling the work that game animators do. I'm just saying you need more breadth on your reel if you want to get a job at a film studio.

Oh I know you weren't belittling (how DO you spell that?). I had the opportunity to look over Coops shoulder during his time at AM and I know you arent a meanie. Maybe Oscar, but not you.

Anyway, I only wanted to point out that animating at a game studio has leveled me up tremendously because you spend all day with the fundamentals, day after day, move after move. Weight, posing, timing, overlap. All day. So then, I recently did another acting piece and MAN did it show. It's kinda like even though lifting weights doesnt necessarily make you a better basketball player, having strong legs certainly is essential. -And game animation is one of the best workout regimens I've ever been through.

jeandenis
07-06-2005, 07:06 PM
Hey, thanks a lot for taking time to answer all those questions! Much appreciated!

My questions would be about eyes:

Do you plan out the broad eye movements/directions on paper and use reference for more detailed moments? Or do use reference for everything and then simplify as you refine the animation? Or are you experienced enough to not use reference at all?

Thanks!

Cheers
Jean-Denis

t░mmi
07-06-2005, 07:35 PM
hi victor,

first of all thanks a lot for taking the time to do this, it's really inspiring and also very motivating that you are interested in helping the younger folks on their way and share a bit of you hard earned knowledge.

i'd be interested in the following:

- what kind of reference footage do you find most useful for your animation? do you use more live action movies (like chaplin for body language) or do you watch lots of other animation (old disney stuff, warner cartoons,...). do you still use muybridge or the survival kit as most students do or do know it inside out already?
(i know this depends on the kind of shot or animation style, but maybe there is a tendency. i heard of some animators who generally don't look at other animation at all for reference.)

- do pixar animators videotape each other / act scenes out on a regular basis or is this rather rare because everybody is concerned with his/her own shots? maybe mostly in the development/research phase?

- don't know if you can talk about this, but do you have like a movie library or dvd collection available at work, where for example the animators can look for reference and inspiration? or do the animators take care of their own footage...

- where do you get any reference for a movie like cars (maybe herbie ;) )?


ok, keep up the good and inspirational work and i wish you lots of fun on future projects. i'm much looking forward to enjoying cars, i'm sure this is gonna rock!

thx and thumbs up from germany... :thumbsup:
thomas

supergrover
07-06-2005, 08:50 PM
Hi Victor,
What's your favourite Looney Tune and why?
Matt

vnavone
07-06-2005, 09:11 PM
1- Can you improvise when animating at pixar?

2- Have you ever tried some crazy experiments in 3D like doing a Tex Avery-like animation? if yes, what did you get?

3- Few top notch professionals are popular or even present in internet forums. Why is that so?
Hi Daniel,
1 - I don't understand what you mean by "improvise" in this context. I come up with my own performances, if that's what you mean.
2 - The closest I've done to that would be a shot of Mike getting repeatedly injured by his car in "Mike's New Car". That was pretty fun!
3 - I guess they have better things to do with their lives.

vnavone
07-06-2005, 09:18 PM
1) You've gotten the question already about having free time and you say you do ( not crazy hours), but are you really the exception or the norm. Kind of wondering about maybe the tool and effects guys. I can imagine they put in some long hours?

2) Also this was bothering me I was watching the indredibles this weekend for the God knows what time, but one of my friends asked me something and I was like ummmmm. So is mirage a super? It alludes to it but I can't find anything anywhere... just bothered me cause I never thought it. Oh well.Hi Christopher,
1) Sure, other departments have it harder. I think lighting has to work some crazy hours because they're always waiting on renders. Editorial has it by far the worst. They're involved in the show from the very beginning to the very end, and they're always crunching!
2) Mirage is not a Super, unless you count her power to be really sexy; she's more of a Super-Groupie. There were various subplots with her early on that got thrown out, and they settled for just the implication that she and Syndrome were romantically involved. Her motivation for turning against Syndrome was problematic for a long time.

tevih
07-06-2005, 09:45 PM
I thought it was cool that notmuch was told about Mirage. As her name suggested, it seemed like there was more than meets the eye...

Vogeler
07-06-2005, 09:57 PM
Hi Victor!

A couple of questions for you:

1) Do you think animation has changed much since you started?
2) What's the average salary at Pixar?
3) How important do you think it is to know people already in the job in order to break through?

-Michael Vogeler

vnavone
07-06-2005, 10:20 PM
1 - What is general office life like at pixar? Do you practically give up your life while working on a production, or do you get plenty of time to focus on your shots and get them looking good at your own pace?

2 - Is the general office as 'cool' as it seems? The featurettes on DVDs show the office to be a spectacular place to work, with numerous recreational areas, 'themed' rooms, bars, and other non-officey things - you even have an office monkey! Is it like this really? Are the 'true' studios held in an underground bunker in a shabby, windowless factory where workers are chained to the desks and fed moldy bread and dirty water?I've already spokine about my hours. The environment at Pixar really is fun. The DVDs are pretty accurate there. We don't actually have a monkey, though. And we work really hard (I don't think they show much of that part). As long as we get the job done they let us run wild.

vnavone
07-06-2005, 10:24 PM
can you elaborate more on this? can you provide any insight as to what kind of controls the proprietary software you use at Pixar for facial animation usually provides? too bad posting screenshots are probably forbidden but damn i'd love to get a look at how the app looks like 8]I don't think I'm allowed to elaborate much more on this. Suffice to say there are probably about 100 controls in the mouth alone to move different regions in different ways. Lip curls, snears, pulls, up&downs, etc. There is a standard set of controls that the riggers build into all our character models so that we know what to expect when we animate them.

vnavone
07-06-2005, 11:02 PM
Do you plan out the broad eye movements/directions on paper and use reference for more detailed moments? Or do use reference for everything and then simplify as you refine the animation? Or are you experienced enough to not use reference at all?I approach the eyes the same way I approach the rest of the shot, using whatever reference and planning I need. The eye directions are built into the poses and I rough in blinks to add texture and beats to the phrasing of the shot.

vnavone
07-07-2005, 12:40 AM
- what kind of reference footage do you find most useful for your animation? do you use more live action movies (like chaplin for body language) or do you watch lots of other animation (old disney stuff, warner cartoons,...). do you still use muybridge or the survival kit as most students do or do know it inside out already?
(i know this depends on the kind of shot or animation style, but maybe there is a tendency. i heard of some animators who generally don't look at other animation at all for reference.)

- do pixar animators videotape each other / act scenes out on a regular basis or is this rather rare because everybody is concerned with his/her own shots? maybe mostly in the development/research phase?

- don't know if you can talk about this, but do you have like a movie library or dvd collection available at work, where for example the animators can look for reference and inspiration? or do the animators take care of their own footage...

- where do you get any reference for a movie like cars (maybe herbie ;) )?Hi Thomas,
1 - Usually live action footage, either of actors or regular poeple. I get inspiration from other animated shots sometimes, but we try not to use that too much as we don't want our animation to become "inbred". I still use Muybridge and Williams and Illusion of Life.
2- Sometimes we tape eachother. I had a friend sliding around in his socks on the wood floor of Pixar's atrium when I needed reference of Dash running and turning on water. Usually I just film myself when possible.
3 - We have a movie archive, and if they don't have something you want chances are someone else in the studio will. For Cars there are plenty of movies with cars in them for physics reference. For the acting portion we just look at human performances for reference.

ReaperXVIII
07-07-2005, 01:01 AM
1. When you animate, do you animate part by part, like completing the body movement first then move on to the facial animation?

2. 100 controls in the mouth alone?! Now I'm beginning to understand why this takes so long. Do you use them all? Or do you use some more than others? I'm not sure how much you can elaborate.

KLThomas
07-07-2005, 01:23 AM
Hi Victor!

I gotta ask. Did you ever find out if indeed that was you in Mad Magazine?

vnavone
07-07-2005, 01:27 AM
1. When you animate, do you animate part by part, like completing the body movement first then move on to the facial animation?

2. 100 controls in the mouth alone?! Now I'm beginning to understand why this takes so long. Do you use them all? Or do you use some more than others? I'm not sure how much you can elaborate.1. I tend to block in the rough facial expressions with the rest of the poses. Not all of my coworkers do this, but I like to see complete poses.
2. I use exactly as many as I need to! I probably only use about 30% of them on average, but it's good to have the others there for more complex mouth shapes or cheats to camera.

vnavone
07-07-2005, 01:29 AM
I gotta ask. Did you ever find out if indeed that was you in Mad Magazine?The artist contacted me and confirmed that, yes, it's me. Yeah!

rawskull
07-07-2005, 01:29 AM
hi Victor !


i had been expecting with a lot of hope to see your reply to my questions !

but for some reason i think it got lost in the sea of other excellent questions !

i will be really happy if you can find some time and take a re look at my post its simple and may be it comes across as silly but it really will make me happy if i get a chance to read my reply on my post

thank you for the attention !

http://www.cgtalk.com/showpost.php?p=2439464&postcount=246

warm regards

VINDO

pearson
07-07-2005, 01:57 AM
Hi Victor! It's hard not to gush, but suffice it to say that you rock! I couldn't believe the fluidity in the "tests" you did with the alien (the blaster kick-back one in particular) way back when. :bowdown:

My questions are:
1. With 60 animators, you must not sit through dailies for everyone, so how do the dailies work? Do you only go to dailies once in a while, or do you show up just for your part, or do the leads go and then email you feedback?

2. At what point does a shot start to show up in dailies? After it's blocked out? What if you're animating straight ahead but you're only half done?

Thanks a bunch!

webhead
07-07-2005, 02:32 AM
Hi, Victor.
Thanks for giving us this opportunity!
How do you deal with staying focused on the same scene or project while working on it for such long periods of time?
I remember one Disney animator complaining that the Prince in Sleeping Beauty was boring to animate. Ever have a boring character assigned to you and how did you deal with the assignment?
What is your favorite type of characters to animate?
What kind of friendly rivalries (or maybe not so friendly) rivalries go on amongst the animators?

mweyna
07-07-2005, 02:40 AM
Hey Victor! Good to see ya doing this. I rememeber seeing your animation as a product demo for A:M at some computer fair a few years back.

As a starting animator what are your feeling on demo reels? What makes a good demo reel to you?

Also, any thoughts on the big studio vs small studio given your own history? Pixar has the employee size but from the DVD's always seemed like more of the small studio family atmosphere rather then the EA's, Disney's or other corporate giants? Which do you prefer and why?

How did you hone your animation skills in the beginning? Looking at Alien Song its fantastic, what came before that though to allow you to reach that point?

Thanks,

rongen
07-07-2005, 03:13 AM
Hi Victor,

You are really a great inspiration for all of us. Enough said.
Everyone loves Incredibles and other works by Pixars...

Would you mind telling us what/who is the next character for animation movie you are currently doing? (any great shots to show?) - Just curious.

PS: AnimationMentor.com doesn't work well in Netscape. or maybe its just on my PC :(.. but it works well on Firefox.. Nice site, cool school! - nice price too !!!

Ron

patconnole
07-07-2005, 03:47 AM
Yo!

Thanks for answering all these questions! It's really informative!

avmani
07-07-2005, 04:54 AM
Hi Navone!

here i'm asking the same question again, if u feel free reply me. i would be happy.( shall i know y u didn't replied me yesterday?),

HI Navone!

I'm glad to have this opportunity to be with u here .

u and Carlos Baena are my all time favorite and inspiration artists in this industry.

Right now i'm working as texturing & matte painting artist.If i have to work in company like pixar what they would expect in my show reel and how many years i should have as experiance? because i don't know anything about animation and all.So can u explain me about how my show reel has to be? and how should i prepare to get in to?

thanks for u and CGtalk for this nice opportunity.

Benman
07-07-2005, 06:04 AM
Hey Vic!

Its been my dream to do your job since i was 10 years old, im currently 15 and wondering what advice would you give me to be a good animator like your self and get a job in a top studio.

Cheers mate.

vnavone
07-07-2005, 06:29 AM
what do u think of " Howl's moving Castel "

LAST QUESTION : what compositing software do they use in PIXAR [ is it APPLE SHAKE ? ] or do they use some other method to finish the film
Hi Vindo,
Normally I love Miyazaki's films, but I was disappointed with Howl's Moving Castle. I thought the story was unclear and poorly resolved, and it felt like he was reusing ideas from his previous films.
I don't know what compositing software Pixar uses.

vnavone
07-07-2005, 06:35 AM
Hi Victor! It's hard not to gush, but suffice it to say that you rock! I couldn't believe the fluidity in the "tests" you did with the alien (the blaster kick-back one in particular) way back when. :bowdown: You are too kind!
1. With 60 animators, you must not sit through dailies for everyone, so how do the dailies work? Do you only go to dailies once in a while, or do you show up just for your part, or do the leads go and then email you feedback?

2. At what point does a shot start to show up in dailies? After it's blocked out? What if you're animating straight ahead but you're only half done?1. Every animator doesn't show during every dailies. We show our work voluntarily when it's ready for critique. That may be between 1 and 3 times a week, depending on how complex the shot is. We are supposed to attend dailies every day whether we are showing or not. They usually last between 1 and 1.5 hours. We sometimes have additional reviews called "walkthrus" in the afternoon where the director and sup's will come to your office.
2. We show in dailies as soon as the shot is blocked. No one works straight ahead from beginning to end, and it's important to get the shot in front of the director early so that you don't work too much on an idea that's not what he wants.

vnavone
07-07-2005, 06:41 AM
How do you deal with staying focused on the same scene or project while working on it for such long periods of time?
I remember one Disney animator complaining that the Prince in Sleeping Beauty was boring to animate. Ever have a boring character assigned to you and how did you deal with the assignment?
What is your favorite type of characters to animate?
What kind of friendly rivalries (or maybe not so friendly) rivalries go on amongst the animators?It's easy to lose faith in your original ideas when working on a shot for so long, so it's important to get feedback often from the director and other animators. It's great when you can take a break from a shot, too, but that doesn't happen often. The only boring characters I've had to work with have been background characters that I have to do "keepalive" for. Usually I can find something interesting for any character to do, but sometimes they just want subtle motion to keep characters moving. That gets boring fast. I enjoy animating a variety of characters, but I guess the broad, cartoony ones are the most fun. I wouldn't say there are rivalries but there are definitely plenty of practical jokes going on. One animator returned to his office after vacation only to find a giant pink phallus painted on his wall. We also enjoy hazing interns.

vnavone
07-07-2005, 06:43 AM
Would you mind telling us what/who is the next character for animation movie you are currently doing? (any great shots to show?) - Just curious.

PS: AnimationMentor.com doesn't work well in Netscape. or maybe its just on my PC :(.. but it works well on Firefox.. Nice site, cool school! - nice price too !!!Hi Ron, I can't talk about Cars until it comes out next June. As for Animation Mentor, you should be running that in Internet Explorer, not Netscape.

vnavone
07-07-2005, 06:45 AM
Right now i'm working as texturing & matte painting artist.If i have to work in company like pixar what they would expect in my show reel and how many years i should have as experiance? because i don't know anything about animation and all.So can u explain me about how my show reel has to be? and how should i prepare to get in to?I don't know anything about getting a job as a texture artist. I am an animator.

Lorenzo
07-07-2005, 09:19 AM
I remember the time I whas living in Montreal Canada and I whas sending you a mail, for how the great whas your alien song animation with the soundtrack of Aretha Franklin, one of my favorite soul singer's, with Bettye Swann, not so famous, but a GREAT VOICE to... lloll,
If you need help for making specials effects, in California, her I am...:deal:

All the best your future...

I hope you will stay many years doing those greats faces expressions, and comic body moving...:bounce:

Cheers

Lorenzo

Tree D artist... Switzerland... (hum... yes whe have 3D in this country) lloll :wise:

mfraiche@yahoo.fr

rawskull
07-07-2005, 09:37 AM
THANKS A LOT FOR THE REPLY Mr Victor :bounce:


Best of luck in whatever you do !

andy_maxman
07-07-2005, 11:32 AM
a few more questions, Victor -

1. do animators have their own private workplace or is it shared by others?
2. i saw a picture of an animator who does not use a chair? does all the work standing. is that true?
3. like anyother artform artists tend to warmup their mind and body before they begin a new work/day. What do you do to warmup when you get on to a new animation project?
4. an advice on 'balancing' it all? work/life/hobbies/family
5. ever plan to pen a book?
6. man i love you and this forum for making this happen :bowdown::bowdown::bowdown:

jjjazzz
07-07-2005, 02:54 PM
Hi Victor,

Not original but as usual, I want first to congratulate you, your jobs are awesome !
I've few questions for the moment, I hope they are not even posted, because I've not finished reading all this thread !

1-Happy birthday to your daughter, first year... Great, My son will have his first birthday too this sunday... I propose you a deal, we can organize a Date between them ? The middle distance between us is right in the Atlantic Ocean, we will be near cara´be in his little plastic swimming pool when you want ;-)))

2-More seriously, I'm lead animator in a french 3D company (near Bordeaux where you've studied, isn't it ? ) and I want to know if the duration of a scene is definitive before you begin to animate or if you have some liberty to ajust it with the action needed in the scene ?

3-About demo reel for a big company (as Pixar is), what support is better : VHS (secam, PAL, NTSC...) or is DVD good ?
For the duration, I think 3 min is very long for animation and may be boring for the person who watch it. But do you think it's better to put finished works (I mean rendering, FX compositing...) or captures or a mix of what you have ?
Is it good too to put 2D rough, artwork and other artistical but non animation works (in less proportion, sure ! ) in a demo reel ?

Thanx for being aware of our messages and keep on going !

Thibaut (rponouced "teebo")

NB : good luck for your guitar learning session, I think music is a very good hobbie for an animator (beat, tempo, timming, earing...).
A last thing, could you congratulate the rest of the Pixar staff for making me dream and especially Mr Baena who have a funny good spanish ("spaniard" as you write ??? ) accent on AM demo video...

vnavone
07-07-2005, 08:07 PM
1. do animators have their own private workplace or is it shared by others?
2. i saw a picture of an animator who does not use a chair? does all the work standing. is that true?
3. like anyother artform artists tend to warmup their mind and body before they begin a new work/day. What do you do to warmup when you get on to a new animation project?
4. an advice on 'balancing' it all? work/life/hobbies/family
5. ever plan to pen a book?1. We all have our own offices, though some of us share. In lieu of cubicles some of us have wooden shacks.
2. Some people like to stand while they work. Many of us have special desks that can raise or lower depending on how we want to work. I'm standing as I type this.
3. I don't have any special routine other than getting breakfast, going to dailies, checking mail, then starting work.
4. No advice. That's something you'll have to prioritize for yourself. Having kids is a quick way to put your life's priorities in perspective.
5. I've thought about it, but I'll never have time.

vnavone
07-07-2005, 08:13 PM
1-Happy birthday to your daughter, first year...

2-More seriously, I'm lead animator in a french 3D company (near Bordeaux where you've studied, isn't it ? ) and I want to know if the duration of a scene is definitive before you begin to animate or if you have some liberty to ajust it with the action needed in the scene ?

3-About demo reel for a big company (as Pixar is), what support is better : VHS (secam, PAL, NTSC...) or is DVD good ?
For the duration, I think 3 min is very long for animation and may be boring for the person who watch it. But do you think it's better to put finished works (I mean rendering, FX compositing...) or captures or a mix of what you have ?
Is it good too to put 2D rough, artwork and other artistical but non animation works (in less proportion, sure ! ) in a demo reel ?Hi Thibaut,
1. Thanks!
2. Usually we are allowed to alter shot lengths slightly as the action requires, unless there is a lot of dialog or the sequence is timed to music.
3. NTSC DVD or VHS would be the way to go. Any work that you think is your best should go on the reel, no matter what state it's in. Variety is good.

Tughan
07-07-2005, 08:57 PM
Believe me, I haven't met any hot chicks because of my "celebrity".
Oh man, all inspiration is gone now. :)

By the way, another question that I'd like to ask; You said that many of animators have special desks that can raise or lower depending on how they want to work. Is there any handicaped animators in Pixar? Working with special desks, wheelchairs, etc. Is Pixar got comfortable environment for people with special needs?

reddynamite
07-07-2005, 09:20 PM
Hey, it's Mr. Silly Man again...

Seriously though, you mentioned Milt Kahl as being your fave animator, or one of your favorite animators.What about his work inspires you? What shots of his would you recommend to me (or anyone else for that matter) to study in order to improve as an animator?

Word- -N

Marcellis
07-07-2005, 11:39 PM
Hey, Mr. Navone! Just one question:

Is there any possibility of Pixar producing a traditional 2-D film?

vnavone
07-07-2005, 11:55 PM
By the way, another question that I'd like to ask; You said that many of animators have special desks that can raise or lower depending on how they want to work. Is there any handicaped animators in Pixar? Working with special desks, wheelchairs, etc. Is Pixar got comfortable environment for people with special needs?We don't have any handicapped employees that I know of, but I'm sure we could acommodate them just fine.

vnavone
07-07-2005, 11:59 PM
Seriously though, you mentioned Milt Kahl as being your fave animator, or one of your favorite animators.What about his work inspires you? What shots of his would you recommend to me (or anyone else for that matter) to study in order to improve as an animator?Milt was an incredible draftsman and a great actor (at least on paper). He helped improve on designs of classic Disney characters as well as churning out some of the most memorable scenes. My favorite is his work on Shere Kahn in Jungle Book. Check out the scene where he's questioning Kaa about Mowgli. Kahl was a cocky, beligerant bastard. I think he once said that he could animate anything, and I believe it.

vnavone
07-08-2005, 12:09 AM
Is there any possibility of Pixar producing a traditional 2-D film?Actually yes. We are in development on "Toy Story .5" in 2D. It's a prequel, and we couldn't do it under the contract with Disney because of a non-competition clause with their 2D films. Expect to start seeing a teaser trailer this September. You heard it here first!

Tut
07-08-2005, 12:22 AM
Heya Victor,
wow, what a read! takes a while to get through hah but very interesting, Thanks for spending the time to answer, very cool. I always get so inspired reading through these Q&A's.
I was always sketched out about having to have a strong traditional animation background to be considered for Pixar, its just something I keep reading about.. but you said you're basically self taught and on the computer! which is great to know :)
You've answered many questions of what I was going to ask but just a quick couple more.

1) When you animate, do you have a main group controller than you translate around and then match the feet to the ground or do you key the pelvis, feet independantly around the scene.

2) How easy is it for someone say .. from New Zealand to get a job at Pixar, assuming the content on the reel is freken amazing! is it possible to get the job and then fly over and start working :)

3) You said you did clean up for other animators curves, if some ppl prefer to key in 1's and 2's... are u expected to clean that up? Sounds horrible, and is it the traditional animators that are messey with they're curves..

Thanks again, I might thank you in person one day (...depending on Q2 answer) catch ya.

Tagi
07-08-2005, 12:42 AM
Actually yes. We are in development on "Toy Story .5" in 2D. It's a prequel, and we couldn't do it under the contract with Disney because of a non-competition clause with their 2D films. Expect to start seeing a teaser trailer this September. You heard it here first!

WHAT THE?!? is this for real???

ok ok you got me for a bit there... dang and my nipples were all hard too.

Malekoko
07-08-2005, 01:01 AM
WHAT THE?!? is this for real???

I'm amazed too! Another Toy Story? I thought that you Pixar guys don't like sequels?
Long time ago, I also read about another 2D Pixar project, named "Ray gun" or something. Can you confirm this one too?

(Nearly forgot to say: Hi, Victor, I admire your work:)

Marcellis
07-08-2005, 01:20 AM
Actually yes. We are in development on "Toy Story .5" in 2D.
WOOHOO! YEAH! :bounce:

Oh yeah, thanks for replying so quickly!

ClaireyFairy
07-08-2005, 02:07 AM
Originally Posted by vnavone
Believe me, I haven't met any hot chicks because of my "celebrity".

thats only cause you havn't met me yet ;) :buttrock: oh yeh!

ok, i'm a student studying 3d animation in scotland. what would you say my chances are of being hired by a company such as pixar, even though i am not living in your fab country.

Would it be especially difficult to be hired? or are pixar and such quite "open" about their recruitment policies.. the reason i ask is because i have always been led to believe i would actually have to move first, set up home and then go about trying for the job however, thats very risky especially being that i'm a mom too!

so whats my chances...?

...of being stolen from scotland for a fab career @ pixar i mean... he he he :deal:

MM_Ghost_3D
07-08-2005, 02:21 AM
Is it possible for me to apply for an internship at Pixar? If so .. how old must I be, and how does one go about doing so?

Thanks for your time and bringing to life those characters.

reddynamite
07-08-2005, 05:22 AM
Milt was an incredible draftsman and a great actor (at least on paper). He helped improve on designs of classic Disney characters as well as churning out some of the most memorable scenes. My favorite is his work on Shere Kahn in Jungle Book. Check out the scene where he's questioning Kaa about Mowgli. Kahl was a cocky, beligerant bastard. I think he once said that he could animate anything, and I believe it.

Thanks dude, I'll have to go out and get me a copy of Jungle Book. Go figure, I have 3 kids, but no Jungle Book...hmmm...weird....yes, it must be done- for the good of all humanity!....well...no...more for my kids, and my animation pleasure..
:applause:

By the way, I loved the stuff that Kahl did in Sword and The Stone also...cocky or not, the guy was animation genius, and I'm sure that perspective will only solidify even more when I revisit Jungle Book. Thx again.....

Oh, and Happy Bday to the little Navone!

word- -N

Jaa
07-08-2005, 06:53 AM
Hi Victor!

I was given a copy of 'Alien Song' a few years back by a friend who just thought it was funny enough to share it. At the time, I was studying C, Java, networking and databases -- blech!. I'm now doing a Bachelor of Design in Multimedia, with 3D as my main focus. Who would've thought I'd have the opportunity to ask you questions when at the time of seeing your animation, I didn't even know what a spline was? http://cgtalk.com/images/smilies/grin.gif

I only have one question for you and it relates to how you personally deal with those moments of despair. I've read all your previous posts on how you battle animators block and how you source other animators views/opinions or just step away from it if you can. But I'm wondering if you've ever had any moments of despair when it seemed that no matter what you tried, who you talked it out with, you still felt as though nothing was working the way you want it. How did you deal with such events? Does it make you feel nervous? Is it as simple as, 'Well, I've exhausted all avenues for relief -- I'll just have to deal with it as it is.'

I recall hearing the commentary on 'The Incredibles' (or possibly another Pixar feature) where the producer/director would just head out on a long drive and talk things out when things weren't working, and that some of their better ideas came out while doing this. But being an animator and part of a team of 50+ animators, I'd imagine that there aren't as many opportunities, if any, to strike out on your own to gather your thoughts.

I know there are no sure fire methods of getting through it; if there were, then this situation would never be an issue. I know this is more of a personal question than a question of your methods and life at Pixar, so I'll understand if you don't wish to answer it. I'm just curious how a person with your experience and your career status deals with this sort of problem. Does it make it easier having other animators and other like-minded individuals at Pixar around you, or is there more pressure because of this?

Thank you for your time reading this and even if you don't reply to my post, thank you for all your wonderfully inspiring comments so far. It's a rare treat to be able to hear from people in the professional CG industry and rarer still to hear from those you most admire.

Take care and I look forward to seeing your work in 'Cars' and future projects.

- Brenden Tamraz

vnavone
07-08-2005, 07:00 AM
Check out this Q&A with Ed Catmull, Andrew Stanton and Brad Bird as they discuss the history of Pixar and the state of filmmaking and animation. Some interesting facts, perspectives and rants:

2 hour wmv movie (http://archive.computerhistory.org/lectures/PIXAR_A%20HUMAN%20STORY%20OF%20COMPUTER%20ANIMATION.wmv)

Hopefully this will answer some questions that I don't get to in this thread!

rongen
07-08-2005, 07:36 AM
Hi Ron, I can't talk about Cars until it comes out next June. As for Animation Mentor, you should be running that in Internet Explorer, not Netscape.

Cool!!! I really appreciate your reply, i feel good and can tell to my friends, "Hey, i spoke with that Incredible Guy :) - He's soo amazing. "

Your work is my inspiration. Keep simple Dude, so everyone can easily reach you.

Cheers,

Ron

andy_maxman
07-08-2005, 07:47 AM
donwloading the movie before it gets hammered for bw issues ....thanks a ton, Victor!!!

i really do hope you dont mind me popping up a few more questions - :)

1. while animating what is your viewport layout like? please do specify the placements too in your viewport.

2. though its software specific - what shortcut keys do you use to toggle the playback controls? the keys you use to move around in your timeline?

3. how tech-savvy are you?

4. could you please tell us who did that shot in M Inc. of Mike when he says to Sully -

' i dont believe it....i was on.......T.V.....ahh! did you see me...? what can i say...i looked so natural... '

or something like that.....that was pure performance....i love that shot like crazy...

cheers!
-andy

dines
07-08-2005, 11:15 AM
Hi Victor,

I love the Pixar style. The characters, colors and stories.:thumbsup:

How much influence would have the seperation of Disney and Pixar arcorrding the next upcoming movies? I mean how big was Disney's influence in Pixars work and how had it changed since the cooperation was splited (in your opinion).

How do you improve your animation skills? Is there any research time? Do you have to do it in sparetime? Do you develop your on techniques and riggs (in connection with the rigging department).

Thanks ... so long

dines

jjjazzz
07-08-2005, 01:10 PM
Hi Victor,

Just a word to say that I've just met Bolhem (one of your french coworker on The Incredibles) and he has talked about the way you worked like a master class (accellerated) in our company. I've finally understood what means "block animation".
He's a cool guy as I'm sure you are.
I've one question about the lots of scenes the director give you to do : how do you do if you don't feel one ? If you try and try and finally you don't achieve to do what you want ? Is this scene go to another person or do you abandon it for a moment ?

Thanx a lot

Tibo

boxcrash
07-08-2005, 01:44 PM
Hey Victor, its me Nolan.

1.Congrats on the daughter being 1. Our son Nate is 8 months now and yeah, things sure do change with kids. Its such a joy to see them take shape as they grow and create there own little personalities.

2.How have you managed to juggle work, family and everything else then find time for personal projects?
Or have you?
Of course you work with it everyday at work so worry of going rusty is not something I would think you deal with..

I know with the fam and the 10 hour works days for me and it being 100% Computer Technical, if I fire up any of the boxes at home I wind down playing games and thats probably only 30mins-1hr at the most.

aj_maceachern
07-08-2005, 02:44 PM
Hi Victor,
Its great that you bother to do these kind of things and i've really enjoyed following this thread..so thankyou. Just the one question came to me as i was watching that 'Pixar a human story' (which is a really great wee movie , cheers for the link) Have you any aspirations of becoming a director at pixar? Working your way up the ladder like Andrew Stanton.
Sorry another question just came to mind...What do you think the benefits are of making the short films like Boudin etc...you seem to be one of the few companies that actually do this with presumably very little commercial payback at the end

Cheers...man you must be a fast typer...

bunter
07-08-2005, 02:58 PM
Hi Victor,

What do you think if motion capture? Can you always spot mocap? Would you or do you ever use it? Will it ever become a threat to traditional animators? Personally I prefer hand animation to motion capture, which always has a weird quality I can't quite define, a lack of exaggeration perhaps?

thanks

William card

nitin_pai
07-08-2005, 03:31 PM
Hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii,

Hey Victor, i am lost for words to compliment you on your efforts, you are indeed an inspiration for animators round the globe, i am new to this world of 3D art and have my mind filled with anormous questions...but i think i better get the knowledge of the terms before asking. So no questions about how do u do this and that. Just a hi from my side and a basic question i.e while doing the characters and different scenes in the movies u have done uptill now how do u prepare yourself for making them if the director has left the freedom of choosing anything by yourself.

caulfield
07-08-2005, 03:56 PM
Hi Victor -


well done for working at Pixar. Pinacle of human achievement.

question-

making character move realistically is one ting. I worked at disney in sydney on jungle book II and lion king 1.5

now I have my own short film - who do I turn to to for real help with the story?

t░mmi
07-08-2005, 04:21 PM
Check out this Q&A with Ed Catmull, Andrew Stanton and Brad Bird as they discuss the history of Pixar and the state of filmmaking and animation. Some interesting facts, perspectives and rants:

2 hour wmv movie (http://archive.computerhistory.org/lectures/PIXAR_A%20HUMAN%20STORY%20OF%20COMPUTER%20ANIMATION.wmv)

Hopefully this will answer some questions that I don't get to in this thread!
hey victor,

thanks a lot for that gem! especially watching brad bird is always fun and entertaining, and of course very profound. i can imagine from what i've seen of him that you had a pretty intense time working with him ;)

did you learn anything special from him, something you could've only learned from him?

thanks again for answering all those questions, it's really appreciated...

cheers,
thomas
:thumbsup:

jedijrmax
07-08-2005, 05:28 PM
Hey Victor, I have just one question.


On the Finding Nemo "Making Of" feature on the DVD, John Lassetter says something like, "Research is so important. I went to everybody and said 'YOU MUST GO TO THE CORAL REEF' and get certified in Scuba lessons. You can NOT make this film without first experiencing it."

Now, maybe this is a silly question, but what if you had asthma, or some other physical condition that prohibited you from participating in this important form of research. Would you not be allowed to animate on the film? Or was John just kind of exaggerating when he said "you HAVE" to go?

Thanks!

~Jeff

pearson
07-08-2005, 05:48 PM
Hey Victor, I have just one question.


On the Finding Nemo "Making Of" feature on the DVD, John Lassetter says something like, "Research is so important. I went to everybody and said 'YOU MUST GO TO THE CORAL REEF' and get certified in Scuba lessons. You can NOT make this film without first experiencing it."

Now, maybe this is a silly question, but what if you had asthma, or some other physical condition that prohibited you from participating in this important form of research. Would you not be allowed to animate on the film? Or was John just kind of exaggerating when he said "you HAVE" to go?


Actually, Victor already covered this earlier. Lasseter was exagerating when he said "everyone". By "everyone" he meant "only the supervisors; not the little people", which is terribly normal for corporate management... :(

jedijrmax
07-08-2005, 06:16 PM
Oh, I'm sorry I didn't realize he had mentioned it; I didn't have time to read through all of the pages, but thank you for pointing that out to me. I'm surprised that someone else asked that, seems like a very particular question, but that's cool. I apologize about the double question, so you can just move on and answer everyone else's. Thanks for the response.


~Jeff

vnavone
07-09-2005, 02:12 AM
I only have one question for you and it relates to how you personally deal with those moments of despair. I've read all your previous posts on how you battle animators block and how you source other animators views/opinions or just step away from it if you can. But I'm wondering if you've ever had any moments of despair when it seemed that no matter what you tried, who you talked it out with, you still felt as though nothing was working the way you want it. How did you deal with such events? Does it make you feel nervous? Is it as simple as, 'Well, I've exhausted all avenues for relief -- I'll just have to deal with it as it is.'Hi Brendan, every artist encounters moments of frustration and creative block, and I've had my share in recent months. I've never run into a situation where I couldn't find a solution and I have a shot taken away from me, though. Usually with enough revisions and the support of my fellow animators I'm able to soldier through it. I may not be thrilled with the end result, but at least the solution was "passing" and enough for me to move onto the next thing. Sometimes I will be able to return to the shot later and fix it with the benefit of hindsight. It's rare that an animator will have his shot taken over by another animator, but once and a while we have shots that are quietly slated for "CBB" fixes (Could Be Better) and are redone on the sly.

vnavone
07-09-2005, 02:15 AM
1. while animating what is your viewport layout like? please do specify the placements too in your viewport.

2. though its software specific - what shortcut keys do you use to toggle the playback controls? the keys you use to move around in your timeline?

3. how tech-savvy are you?

4. could you please tell us who did that shot in M Inc. of Mike when he says to Sully Hi Andy, I'm not going to discuss software stuff here, but I think that I'm pretty tech-savvy. I understand the basic principles of modeling, rigging, surfacing, etc., though I don't have a lot of experience with them. I tend to learn software very quickly. I don't recall who did that shot in Monsters that you refer to.

vnavone
07-09-2005, 02:17 AM
How much influence would have the seperation of Disney and Pixar arcorrding the next upcoming movies? I mean how big was Disney's influence in Pixars work and how had it changed since the cooperation was splited (in your opinion).

How do you improve your animation skills? Is there any research time? Do you have to do it in sparetime? Do you develop your on techniques and riggs (in connection with the rigging department).Hi Dines, Disney had very little influence on our films. Occasionally they would have story notes, but for the most part I think they just let us do our work and collected the money.
The best way to improve you animation skill is practice. I animate every day, so naturally I've gotten better! Good feedback is also important, and I'm lucky to be surrounded by some of the best animators in the world.

vnavone
07-09-2005, 02:19 AM
1.Congrats on the daughter being 1. Our son Nate is 8 months now and yeah, things sure do change with kids. Its such a joy to see them take shape as they grow and create there own little personalities.

2.How have you managed to juggle work, family and everything else then find time for personal projects?
Or have you?
Of course you work with it everyday at work so worry of going rusty is not something I would think you deal with..Hi Nolan,
1. Thanks!
2. See previous posts.

vnavone
07-09-2005, 02:22 AM
Just the one question came to me as i was watching that 'Pixar a human story' (which is a really great wee movie , cheers for the link) Have you any aspirations of becoming a director at pixar? Working your way up the ladder like Andrew Stanton.
Sorry another question just came to mind...What do you think the benefits are of making the short films like Boudin etc...you seem to be one of the few companies that actually do this with presumably very little commercial payback at the endHi Alan, I discussed my feelings on directing in earlier posts. With regard to shorts: though we don't see a lot of monetary gain from our short films they do have their function. First off they give Pixar a lot of prestige by earning us Academy Awards. Second, we own them completely, unlike the features which Disney co-owns. Third, they are a proving ground for new directors, new technologies, and new ideas. Fourth, they're fun!

vnavone
07-09-2005, 02:25 AM
What do you think if motion capture? Can you always spot mocap? Would you or do you ever use it? Will it ever become a threat to traditional animators? Personally I prefer hand animation to motion capture, which always has a weird quality I can't quite define, a lack of exaggeration perhaps?Hi William, I think that mocap has its place, and that place is digital stunt doubles and background characters in live action films. Mocap is too unappealing for use on "hero" characters in animated films and requires enough manual cleanup as to make the cost comparable with keyframe animation. Here is an interesting article editorial on the subject:

http://wardomatic.blogspot.com/2004/12/polar-express-virtual-train-wreck_18.html

vnavone
07-09-2005, 02:31 AM
thanks a lot for that gem! especially watching brad bird is always fun and entertaining, and of course very profound. i can imagine from what i've seen of him that you had a pretty intense time working with him ;)

did you learn anything special from him, something you could've only learned from him?Hi Thomas, we all learned a lot from working with Brad. The things that particularly affected me as an animator were learning to really design my poses and learning to see spacing. Brad can look at an animation loop once or twice and immediately tell you what's wrong with it in very specific terms. He taught us to see every frame of 24 fps and really refine our arcs and spacing. He would draw on still frames of our animation to show us how to push poses to make them more graphic and clear. It was like animation boot camp and we all improved greatly as a result.

Pherbis
07-09-2005, 03:17 AM
Just curious would you agree or disagree to the fact that basically the main way to get a job now and days in the industry is to know someone. I mean there's always that saying, "it's not about what you know, it's about who you know."

And continuing on that- are most jobs filled at pixar because of reccomendations by other employees, or would that at least get you to the interview stage. For instance has there be an open position at pixar and you knew someone for the job and recommended them, and they got the job, even though they might have been slighty less talented then someone who had an awesome demo reel but wasn't known.

vnavone
07-09-2005, 06:37 AM
Just curious would you agree or disagree to the fact that basically the main way to get a job now and days in the industry is to know someone. I mean there's always that saying, "it's not about what you know, it's about who you know."I can't think of any instance where an animator was hired because of who he or she knew. And I've tried to get one or two animators hired. The only potential exception would be when we hire interns, who we come to know as they work with us.

DerPapa
07-09-2005, 06:42 AM
I was very impressed by the incredibles animatic, shown on the DVD. To me, it has almost the quality of a 2D movie itself. It even contains Motionblur (flash running gh the forest) or volume effects (under the water, after planecrash)

1. Is this really the result done in Preproduction, or has it been polished for the DVD afterwards?

2. How become the shots assigned to the animators? Is there a list you can choose a new one from, when a shot is done? Can you disclaim a shot, or pick a more favorite one?

3. What toys are standing beside YOUR monitor? ;)

cheers
Michael

todesco
07-09-2005, 07:38 AM
Hi Victor

you are a god of CG animation, don't need to say more... :buttrock:

1- how you do the facial animations, lypsinc, etc, it's between the body animation? or you do first more simple animations, and refine later?

2- in a walk, it's better to animate the character walking by the scene or use loops?

3- who are your favorite animators in 3D (and 2D)?

thanks for the response

cheers

JulianHo
07-09-2005, 09:06 AM
Hi Victor

I was wondering that given your already hectic schedules and family life, do you ever get the time to work on your own personal projects? :)

Just really amazed on how you managed to juggle everything.

- Julian

PS - Is the rumor about the Pixar Comic Book company true?

Tughan
07-09-2005, 11:12 AM
Hello again. A few more "special" questions for you my friend;

Apart from working, what aspects of your daily life changed after you decided to become an Animator? I mean, it used to be boring to be waiting in a bus station for example, but after I got into animation everything suddenly become very interesting! Watching how people walks, how they move chairs, how that fat lady runs, how that bird flaps it's wings. Now, everytime, everywhere feels like animation referance, and watching "world" is actually very fun! Do you feel the same way? Or do you try to forget about animation stuff when not working to clear your mind.
Do you watch any of the series on TV? X-Files, 24, Alias, Buffy, Angel, Lost, Fastlane, etc. What is or was your favorite show?
Do you have a dream to make your own movie in the future? Do write any scripts/stories in your free times?
This is kind of a software specific question. We know that Pixar uses it's own software for animation.(Marionette) I wonder, is there any "layer" feature? You know, unlike fixing main keyframes, create a new layer on top of it and animate over it. (just like Character Studio in 3D Studio Max) To tweak base animation. (like cycles)
Thanks in advance. :D

rafaelrubio
07-09-2005, 07:19 PM
Hi victor, regards again from spain. Some question more.

1. when you are planning a shot, drawing principal poses, you draw too the "face pose", or planning only the body pose, this is, draw "face pose" too, or when you are animating the principal poses then develope the face expressions looking at yourself in a mirror o in a videocamera?

2. When one person is "starting" in animation ,when do you believe that is the moment to practise acting, i hear to many animators, that before start to animate scenes with acting, is better a solid base in all other parts of animation, bouncing balls, cycle walks, principles of animation...

3. i'm going to buy the book "The Illusion of Life". Is so good as people says? Explains, or talk a lot about the Principles of Animation. The Animation survival kit is amazing!

4. Crush, the turtle in "Finding Nemo" rules! Is one of best animated character i've never seen. I love him. Dory, as you say, is a lovely character too.


5. Victor, thanks again foy dedicate your time in reply to our question, is very very interesting, i am amazed with posibility to talk to you. Congratulate for your work and you are invited when you want to spain and spanish food friend! Stay so Coooooooooooooool! :buttrock:

ReaperXVIII
07-09-2005, 07:32 PM
Hi, it's me again.

First of all I would like to thank you for pointing me towards The Animator's Survival Kit. I feel my head is going to explode with all of the things I'm learning! I'm really looking forward to trying some of this stuff out. :)

Just one question for right now. I am currently reading about animating walks, and I was wondering if you "break" joints when animating. I know it works with 2D animation, but does it look weird with 3D animation?

vnavone
07-09-2005, 08:22 PM
1. Is this really the result done in Preproduction, or has it been polished for the DVD afterwards?

2. How become the shots assigned to the animators? Is there a list you can choose a new one from, when a shot is done? Can you disclaim a shot, or pick a more favorite one?Hi Michael,
1. Yes, those are the actual animatics from prepro
2. The Directing and Supervising Animators assign the shots based on the animators' availability, skills and director's desire. We can also request specific shots if we wish.

vnavone
07-09-2005, 08:28 PM
I'm going on vacation for a week so I wont be able to answer any more questions. Sorry if I didn't get to you. Thanks for making this thread so popular!

DerPapa
07-09-2005, 08:45 PM
So many thanks. Have a nice vacation.

Michael

Tughan
07-09-2005, 08:51 PM
Have fun and nice vacation Victor. Also thanks for this awesome Q&A session man. :applause:

(if you happen to travel overseas, consider to visit Bodrum (http://www.bodrumlife.com) for a great summer holiday) :)

ReaperXVIII
07-09-2005, 10:07 PM
Thank you so much for taking time out to answer my questions. I've learned a lot from this thread. Have a great vacation. You've certainly earned it. :)

Spin99
07-09-2005, 10:34 PM
Hi Victor,

I s'ppose I missed my chance and won't get to hear from you.
In any case I'll have to say thank you for the hard work it must have been
for you to post all this.

I found this thread very informative and have to quote you
We let the old people continue to work as long as they want.
Unless they break a leg, in which case we have to shoot them.
Thanks for a continuing laugh and some great inspiration :)

You're part of Internet history!
I really think Pixar is pioneering 3D animation and technology into this new century.
I'm personally utterly fascinated by Animation and Cartoons as they evolve.

I started doodling when I could hold a pencil and have teenage flipbooks
I can still laugh at. I've also done Fine Arts studies.
My animations are now imminent but I'm still looking forward to some intense reading.

Hope you still get to this post, and I hereby leave a promise that I will have shorts someday.
No I don't mean the Bermuda type.

Cheers,
--JC

leigh
07-09-2005, 10:45 PM
Okay everyone, it's time for this session to end! Victor has been a great sport at answering so many questions for everyone!

Thanks to everyone and especially to Victor for participating.

:thumbsup: